5 Replies Latest reply on Sep 1, 2015 4:14 AM by Bjorn Hulman

    Can we apply different light intensity on different parts of an assembly

    Peter Cohen

      Hello, I adjusted the lighting so that the color matches the one shown on the fight of the screen. However, when I applied different color to different subassembly/part, I need to change the lighting to get the color I want. Doing so makes the color of the first part different from what I wanted originally.  What suggestions do you have?

        • Re: Can we apply different light intensity on different parts of an assembly
          Jamil Snead

          I would suggest altering the appearance properties of the individual parts to get them to show up how you want rather than altering the lighting. Edit the appearance for each part and click the "Advanced" option at the top and play around with the settings for Color/Image and Illumination. Also back in the assembly make sure your lights are white. If you have red light for example then a green part won't show up correctly.

          • Re: Can we apply different light intensity on different parts of an assembly
            John Stoltzfus

            Peter - I see you have a lot of questions concerning the lighting/appearance and color.  It can be a tough process to get everything you want, it also depends on your ultimate goal on the output of these files. 

             

            • Will you be planning to render the final assembly?
            • If you are then the lighting that you are using will not be the same.
            • To get a true color from your screen, the screen needs to be digitally scanned and set according to the test results.
            • Lighting is a huge thing in screen appearance, however the lighting can be turned off in SolidWorks, but on in Rendering and vice versa
            • Once you have a lighting scenario that you like then change all your templates to those changes
            • Lighting direction, gamma, ambient, brightness, transparency and color are all a huge factor in the end result
            • Then throw in the different appearances and mapping, there are more options than I can fathom
            • One of the biggest problems when you want to render something is the fact that you need to almost go through the entire Rendering process before you can see how your color and lighting scenarios will end up being.  If it's not just right now you have to go back and take a guess then tweak it some more