8 Replies Latest reply on May 26, 2015 2:25 PM by Jeremy Feist

    automatic snap mate in assembly

    Kyle Ng

      Hi, I have a question on mating. I notice that some people mate their models by dragging the models in an assembly then everything snaps in place without using any types of mating at all. How can we determine the parts stay in their place correctly?

        • Re: automatic snap mate in assembly
          Deepak Gupta

          They use Mate References in the model using which you can predefined mate(s) in your model and when you drop them in, they get mated.

           

          For example toolbox parts.

          • Re: automatic snap mate in assembly
            John Stoltzfus

            The parts will also snap to the point of origin if you drop and drag close enough to the point of origin.

            • Re: automatic snap mate in assembly
              Kyle Ng

              Thanks for your quick replies. But what is I need to make a new part to add to this whole assembly where they use mate references. How do I know which plane to start on my new model so that it will be in place with their assembly?  I have tried one model and when I brought into the assembly, my part is way off in space if I use mate references  like theirs.

              I also notice that most of the parts they use, the model's planes floating way apart in space and not and not locked in right where the model is. Is this because these are imports from another program?

                • Re: automatic snap mate in assembly
                  Glenn Schroeder

                  Welcome to the forum.  Mate references are simply pre-defined mates in the part.  For example, it's common to use the edge of a bolt, where the shaft joins the head, to create a Mate reference in the Part (see screenshot).  Then when inserting the bolt into an assembly, if you're cursor is close to the hole where the bolt goes you'll get a preview of the bolt in place.  When it's where you want it you release your mouse and there is a coincident and a concentric mate applied to hold the bolt in place.

                   

                  It sounds like you might be talking about activating the Insert Component feature, selecting the Part, and clicking on the green check mark to fix the part with it's three primary planes aligned with those of the assembly (see #10 here: Frequently Asked Forum Questions )

                   

                • Re: automatic snap mate in assembly
                  Kyle Ng

                  "It sounds like you might be talking about activating the Insert Component feature, selecting the Part, and clicking on the green check mark to fix the part with it's three primary planes aligned with those of the assembly"

                  Yes Glenn exactly that. I will look at the link you added. But my confusion is when I create my own model based on my original top, front and right planes my model floats somewhere in space and way off their assembly if I click on the green check mark to fix the part with it's three primary planes aligned with those of the assembly. Is there a way to determine what to do it right from my single model so that when I bring it in it will not float somewhere in space?

                  • Re: automatic snap mate in assembly
                    Kyle Ng

                    what I do is when I insert the new part in the assembly I first hover the cursor over the graphic area to make sure the part shows.  then I click on the green check mark without clicking on the graphic area. My part is now way apart from the whole assembly.

                    If I use their parts to insert into the assembly by doing the same way I mention above then they are all in their places correctly. So I think I must have done something wrong by not using the same plane or reference they use?