25 Replies Latest reply on Apr 29, 2015 10:15 AM by Jeff Mirisola

    Part Configuration in Title Block

    Nathan Cassou

      I would like to know how to label a part configuration in a title block. So lets say that the drawing itself has it's own revisions i.e. from adding notes, or tables, or any "document change", but the part itself has a new configuration but it's the same part number. How do I explain in the drawing that the part is a different configuration? I don't want to add revision letters to different configurations of the same part. That would get confusing if say the part is a REV B and the drawing itself is a REV C.

       

      Any thoughts?

       

      Nate

        • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
          Jeff Mirisola

          One, I firmly believe that the part revision and the drawing revision should always be the same, regardless of where the change was made. Otherwise it leads to confusion (as evidenced by your question).

          Two, by 'configuration, in this case, do you mean that you've made some change to the part?

            • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
              Nathan Cassou

              Jeff,

               

              1) My company insists on making a revision to a drawing if any nomenclature changed such as a new tolerance or flagnote. I would appreciate any better ideas on that as well. Otherwise the part "revision" does not always coincide with the drawing "revision" because of that fact.

              2) Yes this means I'm making a changes to the model. Typically geometry changes are logged in a revision block and the old drawing revisions are archived for reference.

                • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                  Jeff Mirisola

                  Nathan,

                  How your company handles revisions on drawings makes sense, however you have to keep the part revision the same IMO. It's from the part that the revision info (rev level, rev description) should come via the custom properties. When all is said and done, all you care about is that your machine shop/vendor/whoever has the latest version of the drawing to produce the part needed. By keeping the part and the drawing at the same rev level, you take away a level of possible confusion.

                  So you're not actually creating configurations, you're actually changing the model. I mean, it would be crazy to keep every old iteration as a configuration...

                • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                  Dwight Livingston

                  We find our vendors dislike receiving a new model file when nothing in the model has changed, or rather when we claim that nothing has changed. In many cases they will have to redo translations into their own fabrication software - much work for nothing, more chance for errors.

                   

                  We do not send out native files. Our drawings go out as PDFs, with a revision in the file name. If the drawing references a model, then a model version is specified in the notes. Our models go out in STEP format. The version letter goes in the file name of the model.

                   

                  Dwight

                    • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                      Jeff Mirisola

                      Going on the assumption that they receive a drawing, as well as the model, I don't see the issue. If you bump the Revision because of a note change to the drawing, then no need for them to update their model.

                       

                      Do you put the revision in the file name just for the PDFs and STEP files, or is that how you do it for all files?

                        • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                          Jamil Snead

                          We send out pdf drawings and IGES models. The pdf doesn't include the rev in the file name but the IGES file does, because as far as I know that is the only way for them to know they are using the correct file. So if I make a change to a note on the drawing and bump the rev then I would have a new cad model which is identical to the previous one, and I would send the new file to the vendor just so they have one whose name matches the current rev. So I can see what Dwight is talking about. I guess the vendor just needs to trust me if I tell them the model hasn't changed. They can have added peace of mind because our change detail on the drawing would say something like "Revised note such and such" so they would know the geometry didn't change. Also their CAD software might have a compare tool so they could compare the two models and confirm they are identical.

                          • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                            Nathan Cassou

                            Jeff

                             

                            The drawing number which is the same as the part number is what gets the letter revisions. The model gets changed but stays the same part number. We look at the history of the changes of a part based on the drawing revision letter and what engineering change number (document) it's associated with.

                            • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                              Dwight Livingston

                              I think they should worry a lot about keeping track whether the model has changed or not. A guy at the CNC machine, who wonders what file is valid, doesn't want to take somebody's word that nothing changed though the file name is new? Or do you specify it in the general notes?

                               

                              1. MODEL FILE 111-C.SLDPRT IS IDENTICAL TO MODEL FILE 111-B.SLDPRT, MODEL FILE 111-B.SLDPRT IS IDENTICAL TO MODEL FILE 111-A.SLDPRT.

                               

                              I guess also I see no advantage in keeping the revision levels the same.

                               

                              We put the revision just in the PDF and the version just in the STEP.

                               

                              Dwight

                        • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                          Jamil Snead

                          I agree with Jeff that the drawing and part should just share the same revision. Even if the change is just to fix a typo on the drawing or something you can just say the part is a new revision too. If you send out CAD models then the models for different revision might be identical, but the benefit is that you avoid confusion.

                           

                          If you made a new version of a part but you are still using the old version somewhere, then I'd suggest assigning a new part number. I'd advise against trying to order different revisions of the same part number. A vendor might see an order and just  make the latest revision. If the different versions of the part are very similar you could opt to use dash numbers to distinguish the configurations.

                          • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                            Terry Daggett

                            We used to handle parts and drawing like you do. When we did a revision all configs had to be revised together. We just put a description in the revision block (this config not effected by this revision) on the configs that didn't change. Since going with the EPDM we quit using configs for anything that requires a separate drawing.

                            • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                              Bruce Perry

                              If you want to keep track of part configuration revisions I would create a separate table on the side and use use the custom properties to capture the configuration, or you could still use custom properties to capture the configuration in the title block (revision too but the model and the drawing revision should be separate)

                              • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                                Kevin Chandler

                                Hello,

                                 

                                Drawings (and specifications) are legal documents, so any contract to buy or build by them is bound by the content of these documents,

                                 

                                In this context, the SW drawing is not separable from the SW model.

                                All annotations, as well as all views developed from the model data, are one entity: the "drawing" (and not the SW dwg file).

                                 

                                The revision shown on the drawing is neither the SW drawing's revision nor is it the SW model's revision.

                                It's the part's revision (the "thing") as outlined in the drawing and specs (however these docs were accomplished),

                                 

                                For my company, we roll the revision on any change to the part that alters the drawing.

                                Our SW drawing templates don't contain their own revision property and actually only have two properties of their own: Drawn by and Drawn date (both accessible via tab builder) because these properties are all that apply to the SW drawing.

                                 

                                The revision shown on our drawings actually references the SW model's revision property (located on the sheet format to keep it safer from inadvertent oops).

                                 

                                The model's revision is rolled even if it's "only" an annotation edit, such as a tolerance change (we don't store these in the model data and it doesn't sound like you do either) because it's a change to the part (by "part" I mean the actual "thing", not the SW thing) as defined by the drawing.

                                 

                                This method keeps the SW model file in sync with the appropriate revision (via tab builder) and since it's one edit, there's no other properties to synchronize or forget about in other SW files. Then open the SW drawing file and edit accordingly.

                                 

                                Well, that's my two cents. FWIW.

                                 

                                Cheers,

                                 

                                Kevin

                                  • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                                    Nathan Cassou

                                    Kevin,

                                     

                                    So it's common practice with your company to only roll the revision of the drawing if the model itself has changed? I am particularly talking about machined parts in this case but I guess it wouldn't matter. Nevertheless, our parts are always keep the same part number and we don't include a "-REV XX" after a change is done to the SW part file. We only add that suffix to drawing numbers (which match the part number). I should also mention that our part numbering system is the most screwed up thing I've ever encountered and we do not use ASME standards for it. Would it also be common practice to name the SW part file a different rev letter? For instance if I changed a through hole to a tapped hole the part file name is now the next available rev letter.

                                     

                                    Nate

                                      • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                                        Bruce Perry

                                        Just a quick note here; if you change the part name for example add suffix revision, then you need to re associate that new part to the old drawing, My Advice don't do it.

                                        • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                                          Kevin Chandler

                                          Hello,

                                           

                                          1) As mentioned elsewhere, I wouldn't recommended a file name change (at the operating system level). To maintain your external references, you'd be doing pack and go's for even the small of revisions.

                                           

                                          2) I mentioned ASME as an aid to see what is "standard". I don't think this ASME standard isn't legally binding (unlike their pressure vessel codes) so you can use their methodology and adapt as required for your company's requirements.

                                          Probably few companies have identical revision processes, but I'd wager most are highly similar with exceptions/deviations as necessary to their business needs.

                                           

                                          3) As mentioned elsewhere, other data files (flat pattern DXFs, SW pack n go's, PDF drawings, etc.) can travel outside your company (or inside: in or out doesn't matter really) and if all of the data don't jive, then resources (time chasing questions, paying for old parts, etc.) can be wasted.

                                          If your rev process isn't stable and mismatch revs can happen "frequently", then you may also end up with higher quotes or even no quotes.

                                           

                                          4) The basis for every drawing is to contain the data to produce/buy the part without interpretation or assumption. Because the revision is for the "thing", wherever the revision is indicated (usually on the drawing, but also on P.O.'s and inside model data) the revision must jive.

                                           

                                          That my advice (in the form of opinion, not fact).

                                           

                                          You don't have to get to 100% now, but iron this issue now for the "long term".

                                          You can modify it later, but try to get most of the process down now so you can save resources and potential embarrassment later on.

                                           

                                          Cheers,

                                           

                                          Kevin

                                      • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                                        Jeff Holliday

                                        The choice of whether the rev is the same for both the part and drawing can be handled either way. I would agree that it may be more "stable" to have them the same, we handle it by simply putting a note under the title block stating "the model used for this drawing is "XXXXXX Rev yy". The number and the rev level both come from the model custom props. There are times that a part has the part number and rev level stamped on, stamped in or molded in it. If there is a typo / added explanatory note or something else non-functional it will cost extra for the part tooling to be revised.

                                        • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                                          Jeff Wierengo

                                          Regardless of whether the drawing revision and part revision are the same, you can get the configuration name to show up in the title block by adding the following text to your drawing. We include the part model name first since we do not use the same name for parts and drawings.

                                           

                                          MODEL NAME: $PRPSHEET:"SW-File Name(File Name)" CONFIG: $PRPSHEET:"SW-Configuration Name(Configuration Name)"

                                          • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                                            Daen Hendrickson

                                            Another revision scheme used by some uses the primary / secondary method.

                                             

                                            The part file and the drawing file both always share the same primary revision. If the part revision increments then the drawing revision increments as well. However, if a notational change only is made to the drawing (secondary or minor revision) then the secondary revision is incremented on the drawing only.

                                             

                                            As an example:

                                             

                                            Part Rev               Drawing Rev

                                            A                              A

                                            A                              A1 (Change tolerance)

                                            A                              A2 (Add note)

                                            B                              B

                                            B                              B1

                                            C                              C

                                            • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                                              Kevin Chandler

                                              I forgot to mention this in my previous post, but ASME (www.asme.org) has a standard for revisions:
                                              ASME Y14.35-2014 Revision of Engineering Drawings and Associated Documents

                                               

                                              Perhaps this will add some insight into your situation.

                                               

                                              Cheers,

                                               

                                              Kevin

                                              • Re: Part Configuration in Title Block
                                                Aaron Godwin

                                                Maybe I missed this in the posts there somewhere, so forgive me, but how do you know what model file goes to what drawing? If somebody asks for rev C of your part do you give them the model rev C or the drawing rev C?