8 Replies Latest reply on Apr 21, 2015 6:42 AM by John Stoltzfus

    Is it possible to bump a revision level on individual sheets within a detail drawing?

    Matthew Hiser

      I wanted to know if it is possible to bump revision level on individual sheets within a detail drawing using Enterprise PDM. I only have experience using individual detail drawings per part and I wanted to know if there was a better way of doing this as it seems a bit cumbersome to do for every single part.

       

      Example: A detail drawing with 4 sheets in it, each sheet has a different part on it. I want to bump the revision level to REV A on Sheet #2 only, I make the change in the rev box and check the detail drawing into Enterprise PDM. When I increment the revision using Enterprise PDM, is there a way to isolate JUST sheet #2, or will I have to increment a revision on the entire detail drawing and bump it every time I need to make a revision change to one of the sheets within the detail drawing.

        • Re: Is it possible to bump a revision level on individual sheets within a detail drawing?
          Jamil Snead

          I don't use EPDM so I don't have an answer for your question, but I think you should keep individual drawings for each part. For one thing you run into the revision issue you mentioned. Also it just doesn't make sense to me to have multiple parts on a single drawing because if you want to order just one of those parts from a particular vendor you'd be sending them a packet with a bunch of parts you don't want.

          • Re: Is it possible to bump a revision level on individual sheets within a detail drawing?
            Jeremy Feist

            EPDM only controls file level version/revisions. if you want to have different revisions per sheet, you will have to forgo EPDM's revision control and do it manually.

            • Re: Is it possible to bump a revision level on individual sheets within a detail drawing?
              Jim Sculley

              Revisions are per file.  If you have four different parts on four different sheets that you want to track with independent revisions, I have to ask:  Why aren't there 4 separate drawings?

                • Re: Is it possible to bump a revision level on individual sheets within a detail drawing?
                  Matthew Hiser

                  Currently I put each individual part with an individual detail drawing (one sheet per detail drawing), like Jim said. This had been the only way I had been taught, other coworkers in my department do it the way I mentioned before, 1 detail drawing with multiple sheets, one part per sheet. I thought I would ask to see if this was a better way of going about detailing drawings as I tend to have to bump revision levels on parts on a semi-regular basis. With their method, (Less files to worry about, easier to find, sheet and detail changes easier to manage, etc.) I wanted to see if I was missing something why they are doing it that way.

                • Re: Is it possible to bump a revision level on individual sheets within a detail drawing?
                  Jim Sculley

                  Do their multi-sheet, multi-part drawings have different part numbers for each part?  What number does the drawing have?  Does each sheet on the drawing have a different part number?  If so, how do I find the details for part XYZ if it is found on sheet 5 of drawing ABC?

                   

                  To help you determine the 'right' way to do things, we would need some more details on the overall process surrounding your drawings.  In my experience, EPDM is much happier if you stick to the one part per drawing rule.  Otherwise, when you perform state changes and such, you will see all these other part files coming along for the ride.

                   

                  If (and this is a big if) you have multi-sheet drawings with one (and only one) part detailed per sheet, you can conceivably manage this by linking the revision in your title block to a property in the part model that tracks the revision for the part model file.  Since each sheet will pick up the properties of the first model added as a view, different sheets could then show different revisions and those revisions would match the part models.  The EPDM revision on the drawing file itself becomes meaningless at that  point.  You may as well not even revision the drawing file since it in nothing more than a collection of individual drawings masquerading as sheets.

                   

                  I had to break several users of this habit when we implemented EPDM because it wreaked havoc with our automated system that renames and moves models and drawings when they are 'released' from a Work In Progress state to an Approved state.

                   

                  Jim S.

                    • Re: Is it possible to bump a revision level on individual sheets within a detail drawing?
                      Matthew Hiser

                      Jim: To answer your question yes, on each sheet each individual part (one per sheet) had its own detail number so that you would be able to easily find it. There is an assembly detail on one of the sheets showing what detail goes to what sheet in a split balloon style for detail # and sheet number.

                       

                      I do like the concept of linking the revision level of the part directly to the title block, though you would still have to keep the revision table up to date with the changes made every time.

                        • Re: Is it possible to bump a revision level on individual sheets within a detail drawing?
                          Jamil Snead

                          So is it one drawing for an entire assembly, with the first couple pages showing the assembly and all subsequent pages showing the individual parts? That method sort of makes sense, but I have a couple problems with it.

                          1. If a part is used in more than one assembly, how do you know which drawing to look at to find the part details? If it is included in every assembly package then you'd have to make sure to update every assembly drawing with the same changes if the part ever changes.

                          2. For a large assembly (hundreds of parts) then you'd have a drawing with hundreds of pages, and it would be very slow and inconvenient to work with. If you just wanted to just correct a typo on the drawing for a tiny part you'd have to load the entire assembly.

                      • Re: Is it possible to bump a revision level on individual sheets within a detail drawing?
                        John Stoltzfus

                        Matthew,

                         

                        Here is what I do;

                         

                        I use multiple sheets per file, (so far the biggest is over 100 pages),  so I can open up one file and page through the entire document rather than opening each individual one.  There are interchangeable parts in some of my assemblies and if that is the case that part is not part of my drawing pack, it is on the BOM.

                        I keep track of the revisions at the part level and have created my own revision table so is more flexible than the SW revision table, plus all the change/update information is also at the part level, not just the drawing level.  We have a pretty good Engineering Request Change ECR and Engineering Change Notice ECN system and if there are any revisions then that part is changed and only that part is part of the ECR/ECN process rather than the entire drawing pack, also if the change or changes interfere with the other assemblies then we would issue a new part.

                        I have also started to use the Design Journal, so I can attach any documents to the part information.

                        Document control is a huge part of Design/Engineering and it is only as good as the person/people that are responsible, which can make or break the process efficiency.

                        Using the Custom Property Tab Builder to store all the components information is key.