7 Replies Latest reply on Mar 28, 2015 4:04 AM by Paul Cullen

    Printing 6ft wide drawing on 2ft paper

    Kalem Fetters

      hey all, I'm looking to print the base of my tube frame car on our schools plotter. The drawing is 6ft wide, our plotter goes up to 42in, but my instructor is letting me use as much 2ft paper as I please. My plan was to print three sections and tape them together on my frame table, but I have no idea where to start as this is my first time printing a large project. Thanks.

        • Re: Printing 6ft wide drawing on 2ft paper
          Alex Holt

          Is this squared or reeled paper? And how tall is the drawing? May be a stupid suggestion but if it's less than 2ft then just print it sideways?

           

          Otherwise, I would just ensure you have overlapping sections to ensure good lining up when taping together, and just print sections of the correct size as required.

          • Re: Printing 6ft wide drawing on 2ft paper
            John Stoltzfus

            I would save the file as a dxf and use DraftSight or AutoCAD to open up the dxf - then do print select window - set your paper size and you should be good

             

            DraftSight is a free download

              • Re: Printing 6ft wide drawing on 2ft paper
                Alex Holt

                That's what I was getting at - I wasn't sure if you could print a section in SolidWorks. Shame that you can't, it's a feature I use a lot in DraftSight.

                 

                Why save as a DXF though? I'd only ever use a DXF for a CNC application, and a DWG for a drawing. I guess for this though it doesn't matter.

                 

                The downside with this method however is if OP has any shaded views on the drawing.

                  • Re: Printing 6ft wide drawing on 2ft paper
                    John Stoltzfus

                    Well both came in at the same time lol

                     

                    Kalem - I did forget to mention that I also grid my paper, for what you're doing maybe every 6" or so would be good, this is to cut and tape.

                     

                    One important thing is you do need to adjust your scale and/or print percentage, as the printer is not going to accurately print 100% 1:1 scale - there was a post just last week on this subject, I'll look it up 

                    • Re: Printing 6ft wide drawing on 2ft paper
                      Kalem Fetters

                      The part of the frame im printing measures 60" by 72", i planned on printing long ways, and the extra is allowance for print margins.
                      Its just a weldment im going to print top down so i have a template to go by as well as measurements when welding.

                      • Re: Printing 6ft wide drawing on 2ft paper
                        Paul Cullen

                        You can print a part of a view in SW. When I do some Lofted sheet metal developments I print out the development full size so as to make it easier to mark the fold lines onto the sheet metal part. I have an A3 printer and if I need a part that is bigger than this in size I just set my view scale to 1:1 and allow the view to be larger than the drawing sheet, depending on the complexity of the view I might draw some guide horizontal and vertical lines (in a different colour) to help with alignment.

                         

                        Then I print my first sheet and I get the first section of my part then I move the view on the drawing sheet and do a second print to get the next section and so on. I have a large windows in my office and I then tape the first sheet to the windows and then overlap the next sheet on the first and so on until I have my full size flat pattern. I tape it to the windows as it makes it very easy to see the lines on the bottom sheet on through sheet that you are putting on top of it.

                         

                        If you want to save you drawing for use again later just create your first sheet with any guide lines you want then copy and past this sheet into the drawing so as to get the required number of sheets. Then lock the view position on the first sheet, go to the second sheet and move your view to the segment that you want to print then lock that view position, continue to do this on all other sheets then you will be able to recreate your template in the future by just opening your drawing and printing all the sheets.

                         

                        Paul