6 Replies Latest reply on Jan 6, 2015 1:56 PM by Mark Kaiser

    Solidworks 2005 question

    Stuart Freeman

      I know most of you have later versions, but I'm a self taught "newbie" and I can't afford to upgrade. Anyway. I've been Using Solidworks to create Celtic Knotwork and I've run into some problems with some of the more complex designs. Most notable is this one...

       

      073_c.bmp

       

      Using WinTopo Freeware, I've created a DXF file and imported to solidworks. When I attempt to extrude to sketch, only one or two sections actually extrude. I've run into this a few times now and I cant figure out what's wrong. In some cases I've been able to create a new sketch over the top of the imported DXF, but that doesn't always fix the problem. It seems to occur most often when there are a large number of separate elements such as the sketch above. Any input on this problem would be greatly appreciated.

        • Re: Solidworks 2005 question
          Mark Kaiser

          Extrudes are meant to be created from one closed sketch, usually.  You have a large sketch with mulitple closed sections.  If you need to extrude this, depending on the shape you're extruding it onto, I would extrude one piece of it, then use a feature pattern to create/copy the rest of the extrudes.

           

          If you're creating the pattern just for graphics/picture, SW features may not be the best approach, unless you can apply it as a texture.

          • Re: Solidworks 2005 question
            Jamil Snead

            The problem may be that when the dxf is imported a lot of the lines don't actually connect at the corners, maybe there are tiny gaps. But I think Mark has the best suggestion using a pattern. I'd just try to extrude the left 5 sections and the right 2 sections. Then linear pattern the 3 repeating bodies. For the initial extrude you could try to use the imported sketch and just select the contours to extrude, but I think I would make a new sketch and convert entities of the contours you want, then extend the line segments if needed to close any tiny gaps.

            • Re: Solidworks 2005 question
              Stuart Freeman

              Thank you for the compliment. I actually started to get into manufacturing about 10 years ago now. It's where I was first introduced to Solidworks. Unfortunately, life has a way of screwing up plans, and now I'm really too old to try and pursue a new career. Instead, I'm teaching myself for my own pleasure. It's just me and my cat here, so I can "play" just about as much as I want. Besides, it keeps my brain busy, instead of drooling like an idiot, staring at the TV. (What my mother always referred to as being a "vidiot")