13 Replies Latest reply on Dec 4, 2014 6:54 PM by Jared Conway

    "SolidWorks Simulation Standard" vs "SolidWorks Premium"?

    John Willett

      There is a new promotion package (1) being offered including "SolidWorks Standard" + "SolidWorks Simulation Standard" (apparently a relatively new addition to the lineup) + 1 year subscription.  The price is essentially the same as another promotion package (2) for "SolidWorks Premium" (actually "SolidWorks Professional" with an immediate upgrade to "SolidWorks Premium") + 1 year subscription.

       

      I'm interested almost exclusively in modeling relatively simple 3-D assemblies comprising several solid parts made of different materials and, especially, in performing linear static FEM analyses on these assemblies subject to external constraints (fixtures) and gravity.  I don't anticipate any need for non-linear-, dynamic-, or thermal-analysis, drop tests, etc.

       

      The linear static FEM in "SolidWorks Simulation Standard" **appears** to offer more control than the similar capability of "SolidWorks Premium,"  but it's rather difficult to tell because the comparison matrix for the latter does not get very specific in terms of "FEM" controls, "Contacts and Connectors," or "Linear Static Simulation for Assembly."  Is there really any difference?  If so, this would suggest that new combo (1) is the way for me to go.  On the other hand quite a bit is cut out of the 3-D CAD capabilities of  "SolidWorks Premium" when 'downgrading' to "SolidWorks Standard," suggesting that (2) might be the better choice, although it's not clear that I would miss any of the fancy stuff.

       

      Can anyone help clarify the key differences between these two promotion packages and advise me which way to go for my intended application? -- John Willett

        • Re: "SolidWorks Simulation Standard" vs "SolidWorks Premium"?
          Alessandro Tornincasa

          John,

          SolidWorks Premium will give you linear static analysis and motion. It will add also more CAD add-ins lke SolidWorks routing, scan to 3d, Toolbox,  rendering (see the product Matrix for more details :3D CAD Matrix | SOLIDWORKS ).

          SOLIDWORKS Simulation standard will give you linear static,  motion,  trend tracker, and fatigue.

           

          Another difference: SolidWorks Premium is a license where CAD and analysis go together, you can't therefore transfer only the simulation functionality to another solidworks license (supposing you have two or three solidworks Cad licenses).

           

          SolidWorks Simulation standard is a standalone analysis license with its own serial which you can float or transfer between your solidworks licenses.

           

          Alex

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            • Re: "SolidWorks Simulation Standard" vs "SolidWorks Premium"?
              John Willett

              >>SolidWorks Premium will give you linear static analysis and motion. It will add also more CAD add-ins lke SolidWorks routing, scan to 3d, Toolbox,  rendering...

              SOLIDWORKS Simulation standard will give you linear static,  motion,  trend tracker, and fatigue.<<

               

               

              Alessandro -- Thanks.  My reseller referred me to the matrix comparisons for the two products, hence some of my puzzlement. Some detailed follow-up questions if I may:

               

              1) Most importantly, are the linear static analysis capabilities actually identical between the two packages?

                   a) I see a lot more details in the matrix for SolidWorks Simulation Standard (some of which, like "Mesh control capabilities" and "h and p adaptive element type," sound important) than for "SolidWorks Premium" (apparently all under "Structural Part and Assembly Analysis" in that case).

                   b) I also see a lot of specific "Contacts and Connectors" that sound useful and a "Customizable Material Library" under the former but not the latter.  (One thing I know I will want to do is modify existing materials and save them with new names to use in certain parts made of special materials.)

                   c) I've heard that there's a "Large Displacement Mode" that provides an automated sequence of solutions to approximate non-linear problems within linear analysis, but I don't see anything about that anywhere.

                   d) Finally, I will need to export selected numerical results in the form of arrays of nodes, displacements, etc., for external computations (see thread at "forum.solidworks.com/thread/63028" for more details.).  Can I expect to do that as easily with either package, or might that feature work better in "SolidWorks Simulation Standard?"

               

              2) I should clarify that I'm an individual retired scientist who will be working primarily on my own in a "hobbyist" mode.  I'm new to both CAD and FEA, having only worked on one analysis project remotely with a friend who has a SolidWorks Premium license.  The most collaboration I'm likely to do is to exchange models with my friend.  Obviously I'm not in an industrial environment, so at most I would send drawings out to a machine shop for single-unit fabrication.  I don't really understand what "SolidWorks routing, scan to 3d, Toolbox, rendering" or "trend tracker" are, nor how I might use them.  (I guess I have more homework to do...)  Are there any enhancements from "SolidWorks Standard" to "SolidWorks Premium" that I would be likely to need?

               

              3) Thanks for the tip about the separate licenses.  I guess that means with the dual package (1) I could potentially continue my subscription for and/or upgrade one piece but not the other.  Right?

               

              I know that I should consult further with my reseller and that I'm ultimately responsible for deciding what capabilities I need; but I would really benefit by some guidance from an experienced user like yourself, taking into account my experience level, work setting, and probably applications. -- John Willett

                • Re: "SolidWorks Simulation Standard" vs "SolidWorks Premium"?
                  Alessandro Tornincasa

                  John,

                   

                  >>1) Most importantly, are the linear static analysis capabilities actually identical between the two packages?<<

                  Yes, identical capabilities including:

                  - mesh controls

                  - p and h adaptive mesh

                  - contacts

                  - customizable material library (by the way it's the same library used by CAD SolidWorks), so you can create a brand new material (isotropic or orthotropic and save it in the library)

                  - large displacement option

                  - same results export capability (probing nodes and export data to csv)

                   

                  >> 2) I should clarify that I'm an individual retired scientist...I don't really understand what "SolidWorks routing, scan to 3d, Toolbox, rendering" or "trend tracker" are, nor how I might use them.  (I guess I have more homework to do...)  Are there any enhancements from "SolidWorks Standard" to "SolidWorks Premium" that I would be likely to need?<<

                   

                  In SolidWorks Simulation standard you get 2 more features in structural analysis that you don't get with SolidWorks Premium:

                   

                  Trend Tracker: allows you to edit your model by experiments (for example change part thickness) and see how streess, displacement, and mass are changing at each change you've made. See this demo and you'll get an idea:

                  Using the Trend Tracker in SolidWorks Simulation - YouTube

                   

                  Fatigue: here's a short demo:

                  SolidWorks Simulation - Fatigue Analysis - YouTube

                   

                  In SolidWorks Premium there are some extra features for what concerns CAD (not Simulation) which can be useful to a designer:

                  SolidWorks+Premium.png

                  A short summary (maybe you should talk to your reseller to get more in depth information):

                  Toolbox: hardware library for SolidWorks

                  edrawings professional: extends the features of edrawings viewer (measure and markup)

                  utilities: lots of goodies (simmetry check, part simplifier, compare two parts to check what has changed or what's the difference, and more)

                  Task scheduler: schedule any task (for example print alla drawings in a folder, or export them to dwg)

                  Photoview 360: rendering. See what SolidWorks customer have done with it here: SolidWorks Gallery - All Images

                  Featureworks: when you import a part from another system or neutral file format (e.g. step or iges) you get no feature history, and therefore you cannot edit a part by changes its features, but you need to use direct editing. Many times it's easier to have SolidWorks recognize features and build all the features of that imported parts (e.g. extrusions, fillets). This way you can easily edit the part by editing recognized features.

                  Design Cheker: automates check tasks on parts and drawings (especially drawings). Examples: check all the drawings in a folder and report whether there are dangling dimensions, or check whether the font is Arial with 14 points size

                  Costing: very cool technology, calculate cost of sheet metal parts, machined parts, and now even weldments, injection moulded parts, 3d printed parts

                  Routing: easily draw piping (supplies a library of glanges, gaskets, tees, elbows),tubing, cabling. Get a drawing of your piping with isometric view automatically dimensioned and detailed bom (total pipe length, number of tees, elbows, and so on)

                  Scan to 3D: import in SolidWorks mesh or point cloud files (resulting from a 3D scanner), and possibily create surfaces and make it a solid

                  Tolanalyst: assembly tolerance stack up analysis

                  CircuitWorks: import ECAD files (circuits, or PCB's) and help collaboration between mechanical designers and electronics designer

                  SolidWorks Sustainability: simulation tool to help you make your design more sustainable

                   

                  >>3) Thanks for the tip about the separate licenses.  I guess that means with the dual package (1) I could potentially continue my subscription for and/or upgrade one piece but not the other.  Right?<<

                   

                  yes, but remember simulation needs a solidworks license in order to work, therefore you can't quit solidworks subscription, you can only make the other way around.

                   

                  Alex

                    • Re: "SolidWorks Simulation Standard" vs "SolidWorks Premium"?
                      John Willett

                      >>...remember simulation needs a solidworks license in order to work, therefore you can't quit solidworks subscription, you can only make the other way around.<<

                       

                       

                      Alessandro -- Let me make sure I understand you.  If I purchase both SolidWorks Standard and SolidWorks Simulation Standard (say, in the current promotion that includes a 1-year subscription to each) but I do not extend the subscription to either, will SolidWorks Simulation Standard stop working after the first year?

                       

                      In general, one can apparently purchase any level of SolidWorks without a subscription.  I'm assuming that this is a viable option for the impoverished in that whatever purchased version will continue to work indefinitely.  Not so? -- John Willett

                        • Re: "SolidWorks Simulation Standard" vs "SolidWorks Premium"?
                          Alessandro Tornincasa

                          <<If I purchase both SolidWorks Standard and SolidWorks Simulation Standard (say, in the current promotion that includes a 1-year subscription to each) but I do not extend the subscription to either, will SolidWorks Simulation Standard stop working after the first year?>>

                           

                          SOLIDWORKS licenses are perpetual. License will continue working after maintenance has expired.

                          Let me explain the two scenarios I had in mind:

                          1) You quit Simulation Standard service subs next year but you renew solidworks maintenance.

                          You will be able to upgrade solidworks to the next release but not simulation. This means that in order to have simulation working you will need to have two different solidworks releases on your machine (2015 and 2016). You will be using simulation 2015 with solidworks 2015.

                           

                          2) You quit SOLIDWORKS and upgrade Simulation

                           

                          You simply cannot. Simulation works perfectly integrated in the SOLIDWORKS interface, therefore how would you use a simulation 2016 if you don't have SOLIDWORKS 2016 ?

                           

                          <<In general, one can apparently purchase any level of SolidWorks without a subscription.>>

                           

                          I don't really know about this, you should ask your Var. I would purchase service subs for the 1st year for two reasons:

                          1) We're currently in Sp0. I would never keep a sp0 as a perpetual version to use. I would rather purchase 1 year maintenance in order to receive all service pack (SolidWorks 2015 will end its developement cycle at SP5, which is usually released late november).

                           

                          2) Tech support is very useful, especially the first year you're using the software. I see many of our customers improve their simulation skills when I give them support pn their real world analysis cases.

                          Dassault Systèmes asks application engineers to get certified every year. I can assure Simulation Certification is tough because it doesn't measure whether you know where's the button to push, but it measures whether you can solve a real analysis problem with the software, plus it measures how often you use the software, because you really have to be quick (there are many analysis problems to solve and a very limited amount of time).

                           

                          Your VAR will have a certified simulation application engineer, and that will be your man.

                           

                          Alex

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                        • Re: "SolidWorks Simulation Standard" vs "SolidWorks Premium"?
                          John Willett

                          >>>>1) Most importantly, are the linear static analysis capabilities actually identical between the two packages?<<

                          Yes, identical capabilities including:

                          - mesh controls

                          - p and h adaptive mesh

                           

                          - contacts

                          ...<<

                           

                           

                          Alessandro -- Sorry to keep badgering you with follow-up questions:

                          I notice now that the SolidWorks Simulation matrix (all versions) lists several functions under "Post Processing," including

                           

                          Contour, Iso-Surface, Surface, Section Result Plot

                          Probe tool

                          Design Insight

                          etc.

                           

                          I assume that these apply the the results of linear static simulation studies.  Do all of these functions also exist in SolidWorks Premium? -- John Willett

                    • Re: "SolidWorks Simulation Standard" vs "SolidWorks Premium"?
                      Jared Conway

                      solidworks standard > static, trend tracker, fatigue and for sp1.0, some access to materiality (extended material library)

                      solidworks prem > static, motion and a whack of CAD tools

                       

                      if you're doing static, its a tough choice, personal opinion is that swx prem is the better deal if you can find use for a few of the cad tools. fatigue is nice but you need to want to check fatigue and at that point, why not move up to sim pro and check buckling or use optimization and almost everyone can use thermal. trend tracker is nice if you use it!

                       

                      I didn't go through your thread on exports but both should be the same

                      the license split for swx and sim standard I don't think is a huge selling point, for them to work together they need to be same version and service pack anyways so they will both need to be on subs (maintenance)

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