12 Replies Latest reply on Jul 20, 2015 10:04 AM by John Stoltzfus

    Painting (Appearence), Material and BOM

    Lasse Nielsen

      Hello SW forum, I need a little help with a problem i'm currently facing.

       

      I work with two external companies.

      - A metal-factory, who laser-cut and bends my steel parts.

      - An industrial painter, who paint be parts.

      - Myself, who renders images of the product assembies

       

      For this reason, my parts needs to contain the following informations: Material info, paint info and appearence.

       

      So far i worked around this by duplicating the same material and just added a RAL code and an appearence. My material libray thus look like this

       

      AISI 304

      AISI 304 - RAL9005

      AISI 304 - RAL3024

      AISI 304 - RAL7035

      S 235

      S 235 - RAL 9005

      S 235 - RAL 3024

      S 235 - RAL 7035

      etc

       

      When i create a BOM for both of them, the material field thus holds both informations - the color code and the material. The problem is, that the metal factory finds it very annoying with all these different names for the same material. They only care about the material and not the color. The same goes for the painter, who is annoyed by all the material info. He only cares about color code.

       

      Is there a smart way to add material, paint info and apperance in one move like above, but with one custom proberty for material and another for color. Or do I have to add the information manually with the risk of mixing up the colorcode and the apperance?

        • Re: Painting (Appearence), Material and BOM
          Greg Fowler

          I think it's a bad idea to create many duplicate versions of the same physical material only to differentiate the finish coating.  This can lead to severe headaches involving redundancy and I don't even know what else (no to mention simulation which relies on the physical properties dictated by the chosen material).

           

          Custom Properties are your answer.

           

          The "material" property/field should only contain the actual base material (e.g. AISI 304, 1018, Grade IV Ti, etc...).  Have a "finish" or "paint" or whatever-you-wanna-call-it custom property that is used to contain the paint spec.

           

          On a drawing, you can have a column to display the finish spec independent of the material spec, and you can choose when/where to display the relevant info...

           

          Again, custom props are one of the more powerful features of this software...

          • Re: Painting (Appearence), Material and BOM
            Jamil Snead

            I agree with what Greg said. Look into the property tab builder, it might make assigning the custom properties easier and reduce chances of mixing up the fields.

            • Re: Painting (Appearence), Material and BOM
              Lasse Nielsen

              I have thought of that, but that only fixes 2/3 of the problem.

               

              I could easily make a property that contains the material and another where i put in my color-code, but that leaves out the appearance, so I can make render images of the product..

               

              If I do it as you suggest, the metal will still have a grey-ish metal color in solidworks  and not the color corrosponding to the code I assigned in my ProbertyBuilder. I have to manualle add the correct appearance. Since it's manually done, the risk of a mix-up is there. I need a way for SW to add an appearance based on the color-code i put in the ProbertyBuilder.

                • Re: Painting (Appearence), Material and BOM
                  Paul Marsman

                  To help with the remaining 1/3 of your problem I would use Display States

                  • Re: Painting (Appearence), Material and BOM
                    Jamil Snead

                    I imagine that a macro could be written to use in place of the property builder that asks for all that info, and then assigns an appearance based on the color code. I'm not the right person to write such a macro, but maybe with some digging around you could figure it out. Or a little bit easier would be to use the property builder to assign the custom properties, then use a macro to simply read the finish property and assign an appearance based on that.

                    • Re: Painting (Appearence), Material and BOM
                      Greg Fowler

                      That last 3rd seems rather trivial to just manually add an appearance to the part.  Assuming you have to model/dimension the parts manually like we all do for almost all parts, this last step is no different than choosing the material you want to assign.  There's always a factor for human error, where somebody selects the wrong color for the wron RAL code, but this seems like a very minor "error" as opposed to an incorrect dimension or material selection...

                       

                      However, if you want to complicate it unnecessarily complicate it by having the display state reflect the "paint" property, I believe Jamil is correct in that a macro could be developed, but you'd have to run it manually as well - that is; if the paint property ever changed, the color wouldn't automatically update until you re-ran the macro, which seems like it wouldn't save you much effort...

                    • Re: Painting (Appearence), Material and BOM
                      Lasse Nielsen

                      Hi Paul,

                       

                      It looks interesting, but can you make the display state inherit its name after the appearence file or otherwise create a link between the name of the dispay state and the applied appearance? Also can you have the display state shown as part of a BOM or a titel block?

                      • Re: Painting (Appearence), Material and BOM
                        Lasse Nielsen

                        I think I just have to add the apearance manually then. I think I might have made the problem bigger in my head than it actually is. At the moment I started this discussion it just seemed like a step backwards doing more manual work was more "correct" than having duplicate materials.

                         

                        PS. would you guys suggest creating configuration if one part is available in more than one colour or how would you deal with that situation?

                          • Re: Painting (Appearence), Material and BOM
                            Jamil Snead

                            If different colors of the part are used in different assemblies, then I would use configurations so that the correct part number (which I assume is color-specific) will show up in each assembly BOM. However if there is only one assembly with various color options, there isn't really a need to make a configuration for every color. I would use a table on the part drawing to identify different dash numbers or whatever for various colors, and in the assembly I would just have one BOM and then a table that indicated which part number to use with each assembly dash number. Then all you need is one generic configuration of each. If you need to do renderings of various colors then display states can be used, and this could be done either on the part level or simply on the assembly level.

                          • Re: Painting (Appearence), Material and BOM
                            John Stoltzfus

                            Another point I would like to mention, might be trivial but.....

                             

                            Since you mention that you render the assemblies/components, did you realize that to truly copy the render colors and have them reproducible you need to color calibrate your monitor and also the computer where you send any of the renderings to....

                             

                            It is nice to have all kinds of bells and whistles but............   There is a way they can get you in a bind, supposing you send a rendering that the customer approves, but the final shading is different than your screen shot, then what....

                             

                            Greg, Paul, and Jamil answered your question correctly - if you take their advice you'll do just fine..