9 Replies Latest reply on Aug 25, 2014 10:35 AM by Mark Biasotti

    Surfacing challenge.

    Ari Arponen

      Im quite new to surface modelling, but I want to give it a shot. My goal is to make cover panel for this wall unit (it needs to be fully covered):

      Wall.png

       

      As you can see there are many complex shapes. Now what I'm asking in this thread is:

       

      1. What do I need to notice before I start? Any hints?

      2. Where should I start (easiest surface, from the front end.. ?)

      3. The cover panel should be about 3mm offset from the original surface

       

      I hapily receive any question, free discussion etc.. about this topic.

        • Re: Surfacing challenge.
          J. Mather

          Ari Arponen wrote:

           

          2. Where should I start ...

          Search Google for Ed Eaton Curvy Stuff Tutorials DiMonte Group.

          Search Tom Wilson SolidWorks.  (err, maybe that should be Mike Wilson.  Been a while.  SolidWorks One Surface Wonders is a good search term.)

          Search Matt Lombard SolidWorks Surfaces.

          • Re: Surfacing challenge.
            Roland Schwarz

            Before you start "surfacing", take time to analyze the part.  Break it down to its basic shapes and how the intersect and connect.  Once you do that, many of the solutions will present themselves.

             

            Don't be afraid to make a few "scratch" models to experiment with different methods.

            • Re: Surfacing challenge.
              Eric Irwin

              That is a pretty big challenge for your first surfacing project.  I am guessing that you don't have access to original CAD data for this door frame you are trying to build your skin to?  Generally speaking, the door frame would be driven by the door skin, which would be driven by the overall vehicle form.  Maybe whoever gave you this door frame CAD can also send you some surfaces for the door skin?

               

              If you don't have access to the original CAD (native to SolidWorks), then at least keep the above philosophy in mind.  The frame was built using the skin to determine at least the outermost profile.  You may be able to make a copy of the surfaces that touch the door skin (use the Offset tool and set the value to zero) and use the Untrim tool to at least give you a better idea of what the skin will look like.  You can always offset this surface later to give you the 3mm clearance you mentioned.  Once you create the surface copy, you can hide the original surface body to make it easier to see what you are doing.  The Untrim tool has an option to extend the edges which may help too.

               

              I hope that this helps to at least get you started.

              • Re: Surfacing challenge.
                Ari Arponen

                Thanks guys for the answers. I will read those tutorials what J.Mather said, actually have read littlebit already. Always up to good tutorials . I have done some surface modeling, but not as complex as this. I made a decisision to start with more simple part, just to try and learn different solutions, Im sure there will be lots of "sketch"-parts before im finished with this one .

                 

                I got a .step file from that part, it opened as many imported surfaces. I am going to start making the surface in top of that.

                • Re: Surfacing challenge.
                  Ari Arponen

                  Ok, I started sketching a simpler part first. This is the front of the wheelarch, Looked simple enough. Firstly I was wondering that where should I start, as this was my firsts run. I decided to start at the floor level and put planes upwards from there (100mm spacing). And drew sketches into them and used surface loft. Here's the results:

                   

                  SurfaceModeling1.jpg

                   

                  Here's some sketching images:

                  SurfaceModeling_sketch.jpg

                  SurfaceModeling_sketch2.jpg

                  Does it look anything like it should? And sit the best way to model this kind of things make it from bottom to top? Or should I try some different approach?

                    • Re: Surfacing challenge.
                      Eric Irwin

                      Ari,

                       

                      Just a note on overall surfacing technique.  You should resist the urge to do something like put a plane every 100mm and start drawing sections from there.  To make a really good robust surface, you need to break down the surface into it's components.  It is very similar to the thought process of solid modeling.  The technique of placing planes/sketches every 100mm, will just lead to headaches.  What you have done so far appears to be reasonable, but if you continue that way, you will end up with a surface that just isn't very stable.  You can see from the imported surface the basic structure that you should attempt to follow.  This is a good way to think about surfacing technique, in that you are breaking down the problem into smaller bits.  The other thing I always tell people is to use the simplest surface you can to achieve the result you want.  In other words, if the portion of the part you are working on can be created with an extrude or sweep or fillet, then that is how it should be done.  If something looks flat, revolved, or swept then you should use those surface tools to make it.  Relying too much on Loft or Boundary will only lead to trouble in the end.

                       

                      Eric

                        • Re: Surfacing challenge.
                          Ari Arponen

                          Thank you for the tips. I think I will try again from skratch, and keep an eye on things you suggested. I try to use features you meantioned. It is just a real pain because the original part have slim and none "flat" surfaces. 99% of the surfaces are curving into some direction. But I was thinking of raising my 3mm offset into 10-15mm since it does not have actual meaning in practice. So the part I'am designing can be 3mm in some areas and 15mm in other. Then I can use much larger flat surfaces in some points, which should make things little easier.

                           

                          But are you also saying that if I start my part from bottom and go up from there as I made in my first sketch. I should use sharp edges in sketches and use the fillet to round them up?

                            • Re: Surfacing challenge.
                              Eric Irwin

                              Ari,

                               

                              No, I am not saying that your sketches should use sharp edges.  What I am saying is that the little bit that you had completed looked like it consisted of a large main surface, two gusset features, an edge feature, a lip, and then a series of fillets (possibly some draft features too).  Basically, just be careful what you try to combine into 1 feature.  Just because you are doing things in surfacing, does not mean everything should be 1 big surface.  You still need to think logically about how you build your model, just as you do when modeling in solids.

                               

                              Eric

                              • Re: Surfacing challenge.
                                Mark Biasotti

                                before trying to recreate the surface and if you are simply creating an offset "skin" I would first try to get back to the original surface that you can offset by using the Untrim, Delete and Replace face command and close up as many holes on the import body as possible; If it is a well created surface you should be able to.  Then you might discover that you have something you can offset and work with.

                                 

                                Mark