6 Replies Latest reply on Jul 12, 2014 2:38 PM by Jerry Steiger

    Optimum running conditions for solidworks?

    Daniel Pratt

      I am looking at buying a PC whos primary use will be to run solidworks.  I am attempting to make an animated video currently with an assembly with aprox 1500 components.  The rendered video comes out very rough. It jumps and does NOT include all the components in the assembly (smaller components).  I do not want to skimp out on a pc as this is what is limiting me in my solidworks models.  Could anyone please shoot me some advice as to what i should be looking at so i am not restricted by the pc?  looking at a price range of $2000 give or take (not including monitor).

       

      Also as a side note does solidworks normaly have any trouble with large animated assemblies or is it solely my pc that is the issue? 

       

      Thanks for the advice!

        • Re: Optimum running conditions for solidworks?
          Jeff Holliday

          It may help to have more info regarding the specs on the computer you are currently using.

           

          When you get a new one, be surre to get a workstation-class machine with an approved graphics card (nvidia quadro or AMD Firepro). Animating large assemblies will certainly require a mid-level card at least but it will also depend on what type of parts comprise the assembly. If they are fairly basic geometry it will run easier than with swoopy-surfaced parts. Also, I suggest grouping parts in subassemblies where possible to keep the number of individual entities to a minimum.

            • Re: Optimum running conditions for solidworks?
              Daniel Pratt

              Thanks for the advice Jeff. I will definatly be creating sun assemblies as currently ally components are created in the one assembly. I am only running on a fairly stock 2nd hand pc. Wouldn't have a clue what's inside. The biggest issue I'm currently having is creating rendered animations. It's taking me 8 hours to render a 16second animation with about 45 simple components. Granted each component is moving during the assembly but this is still WAY to long.   What is it directly that affects the render speed in regards to hardware? 

                • Re: Optimum running conditions for solidworks?
                  Chris Michalski

                  I read through the March 2014 computer spec thread.  There is a lot of good information in there about current hardware performance for building a new machine.  I'm not sure if there is anything specifically about rendering capacity or not.

                  Also perhaps the PhotoWorks section of the forum (instead of general) might get more feedback from those who render on a regular basis.

                  • Re: Optimum running conditions for solidworks?
                    Jerry Steiger

                    Daniel,

                     

                    Rendering uses multiple cores, whereas SolidWorks typically only uses one, except in a few special circumstances. So for SolidWorks you want to go with the fastest processor you can afford with a minimum number of cores. For rendering, a slower processor with more cores is probably the way to go for a given price. If you spend most of your time doing SolidWorks and only a little time doing rendering, then it probably makes sense to go for the faster processor with less cores.

                     

                    To see what your existing computer has, click on the Windows button in the lower left corner of the screen, then right click on Computer and pick Properties. That will tell you what your operating system, processor and memory are. To find out about your graphics card, you might try searching in the Windows button/Control Panel. Windows moves stuff around so it's hard to say where to go without knowing what your operating system is.

                     

                    Jerry S.

                    • Re: Optimum running conditions for solidworks?
                      Jeff Holliday

                      In addition to Jerry's good advice, another place to get good info on your system is by running the diagnostic section of SolidWorks Rx which is included as part of SW