13 Replies Latest reply on Nov 29, 2015 5:10 PM by Robert Weller

    Make Drawing Component "Transparent"?

    Aaron Moncur

      Hi,

       

      I am creating a drawing to be used in a patent, so it is line drawing format, no color or shading.  However, I need one of the components in the assembly to be see-through in order to visualize the parts behind it.  Is there a way to change the display style of only a single component in the assembly from "hidden lines removed" to "hidden lines visible" so that the part becomes see-through?  Better yet, is there a way to change the "material" properties of the component in a drawing so that it is clear and I can then visualize what is behind it in the assembly?

        • Re: Make Drawing Component "Transparent"?
          John Stoltzfus

          Good afternoon Aaron,

           

          One way is to change your part material to glass and you can apply color and change the transparancy, then show shaded, instead of lines, or you can right click on the part in the assembly and check the transparent toggle button, 

           

           

          Aaron.JPG

           

          Later,

           

          John

            • Re: Make Drawing Component "Transparent"?
              Aaron Moncur

              Thank you, John.  This is very odd, but it appears most of this thread has been deleted somehow.  There were another 6 or 8 posts that have just vanished.  Anyway, the problem is doing what you've described in a line drawing format.  The solution turns out to be alternate views.  I wish those posts hadn't been deleted/corrupted as they would be helpful for others.  Very odd.

                • Re: Make Drawing Component "Transparent"?
                  John Stoltzfus

                  Aaron -

                   

                  When you add your views in the drawing check the Shaded view instead of the solid line or hidden view, so after you insert your assembly in the drawing, pick a view and select shaded.

                   

                  In other words you need to change your assembly files prior to dropping them in to a drawing - this picture is from an actual drawing that I just worked on

                   

                   

                   

                  AaronA.JPG

              • Re: Make Drawing Component "Transparent"?
                LE MI

                Hi Aaron,

                 

                If you don't want to show the assembly as Shaded with edges, I think the feature that may help is Show Hidden Edges under Drawing View Properties. When you drop in the views of the assembly, make sure the Display Style is Hidden Lines Removed. Then go to More Properties. Under the tab Show Hidden Edges, you may select the components which you would like to show through the obstructing objects. For example, as the images attached, you can select the slanted shaft to show its hidden edge so it looks like the big base which used to be blocking the bottom of the shaft becomes transparent now.

                Before.JPGAfter.JPG

                 

                Hope this could help too.

                 

                Regards,

                Mile

                • Re: Make Drawing Component "Transparent"?
                  Paul Sabin

                  I'm doing a design patent too and had the same issue.  I solved it by creating two views.  One is the view of all the opaque parts with the transparent part hidden.  The second view is just the transparent part.  Then put these on top of each other.  Showing one part temporarily on the transparent part will help you line up the two views exactly (then rehide that part).  It's a little extra work, but came out great for me.

                  • Re: Make Drawing Component "Transparent"?
                    Aaron Beaver

                    Step 1:  Rt Click -> Properties -> Hide /Show components -> Add any components that are in the way so that you can click on components under them.

                    Step 2:  Rt. Click parts in the drawing for which you want edges to show->Hide/Show ->Show Hidden Edges.

                    Step 3:  Unhide the original components.  (In the image I made the o-ring and bolt show thru but no other components.)

                    step1.png step2.pngStep3.png

                    step4.png

                    Hope this is useful.

                    • Re: Make Drawing Component "Transparent"?
                      VIGNESH NAGARAJAN

                      Hi Aaron ,

                       

                      Try this out .

                       

                      1. Create A Configuration in Assembly level such that , The component which is to be transparent should be in one configuration and another as default configuration. ( transparent part should be suppressed ).

                      2. Place a drawing view , and change the configuration of your view .

                      3. Right click the particular component from FMDT and choose component line font .

                      4. Uncheck the default option and select visible lines, select the line style as hidden .

                       

                      All the edges of the component will be changed as hidden style. Try this out .

                       

                      Regards ,

                      N.Vignesh

                      • Re: Make Drawing Component "Transparent"?
                        Bernie Daraz

                        This being an older post of at least one year I would be curious how the OP made out with his drawings at the Patent Office examination.

                         

                        While the Patent Office allows drawings at submission that do not have to adhere 100% to the standards, true Patent drawings to the standards will be required before the patent goes to full examination. My concern here would be ambiguity. If the drawing does not clearly show the claimed matter the drawing or the claim will be not allowed or rejected. There is a completely different style of drawings for design patents that I am not addressing here.