3 Replies Latest reply on May 18, 2018 1:15 AM by Vinoth Kumar N.

    Form New SubAssembly Here and In Context References

    Dennis King

      Is it possible to add a part which contains in context references to a new subassembly and maintain any existing in context references in the part?

      For example, say I have an assembly made up of Part A, Part B, and Part C.  Part B has in context references to Part A.  If I then select Part B and Part C and choose "Form new sub assembly here" Solidworks will form the new sub assembly without giving me any warnings.  When I open the main assembly later the in context references in Part B are now all shown as out of context. 

        • Re: Form New SubAssembly Here and In Context References
          Jamil Snead

          I am running into the same issue now, except I do get a warning. When I try to form a new subassembly I get the following warning:

          cpontext.PNG

          Does anyone know of a way to keep the in context references? In my case I have main assembly M1, then subassembly S1 which contains subassembly S2 which contains my part RD0337. RD0377 has features defined in context of M1. I want to form a new subassembly from RD0337 within S2, but it wants to break all of the in context references for it.

           

          Does anyone have a solution or workaround? Are we really supposed to psychically know every subassembly that will be used in the final design before ever creating any in-context relations?

            • Re: Form New SubAssembly Here and In Context References
              John Stoltzfus

              Once you hit move your done - just cut the umbilical cord of your part and assembly...

               

              Does anyone have a solution or workaround? Are we really supposed to psychically know every subassembly that will be used in the final design before ever creating any in-context relations?

               

              I don't have a workaround and the broken relations have been a serious issue for me and..........   That is why I have changed the way I approach all new designs, I haven't used that feature in years and you couldn't pay me to use it ever again.  If you use a skeleton part as the top part in every sub-assembly and main assembly those issues are gone.  All the parts are built off and related to the skeleton sketch therefore you can actually make that part in an extra sub-assembly that is only used to design that part and then you can drag and drop the part into any sub-assembly and it will snap into place.

               

              In the course of a new design there are a lot of parts that get thrown away or modified so much they don't even look like the same part, so it's like you said, "Are we really........" in a way yes, some where you are given the mental picture of the design or sometimes it is a building block system, where you can't see beyond the wall..

               

              The key is to model a mock up solid and figure out most, (not all, but most) of the design detail highlights, from there you can easily establish your sub-assemblies, which I try to follow the manufacturing approach and in some cases the manufacturing technique is a no show, so no sub-assemblies...

               

              Just my 2 cents,

               

               

                • Re: Form New SubAssembly Here and In Context References
                  Vinoth Kumar N.

                  Hello Sir!

                  I heard of regarding the "Skeleton Sketch Part" from you through your PDF presentation and also from this forum. My consent is, would you please write a book related to the Skeleton Sketch Part in Top Down Assembly approach. I'm really eager to learn the that SSP skill and that to be applied in my job. If possible, please at least update a sample work used with SSP with minimum 10 sub-assemblies.