14 Replies Latest reply on Mar 22, 2014 9:19 PM by Samuel Leith

    Setting up a closed-loop static study

    Samuel Leith

      Hello,

      this is the first time I need to set up a 'closed-loop' static study - see image attached.

       

      This is iteration one of a concept.

      The part in white is a torque wrench. It applies a torque to the red part (via a square drive which we can't see). The red part is bolted to the base plate.

      You can see there is a yellow block on the torque wrench. This is the reaction arm, which pushes against the back plate when the torque is applied.

      The back plate, base plate, and gussets are all welded.

       

      What's the proper way of setting up a study for this?

       

      I was thinking of using the 8 threaded holes in the base plate as fixtures, and apply a force where the reaction arm meets the back plate.

       

      I'd run the one study with all parts as solids, with contact 'No Penetration' for the edges that are welded.

      Then, as a second study, I'd simulate the gussets as shells and check for weld sizes.

       

      Is this how you would set this up?

       

      Thank you.

        • Re: Setting up a closed-loop static study
          Jared Conway

          what do you mean by closed loop?

           

          what do you want to learn in this analysis?

           

          is the picture the right picture? i don't see a white part?

           

          is this a commercial or educational project? it sounds like it is something relatively challenging that getting some training might help limit your frustrations and improve accuracy and efficiency.

          • Re: Setting up a closed-loop static study
            Jerry Steiger

            Samuel,

             

            Like Jared, I'm confused. By white part, do you mean the light grey part between the yellow face and the dark part in the center of the red part?

             

            I don't understand how you can apply torque if the yellow part is stopping the torque wrench from moving around the axis of the red part.

             

            Is the torque wrench an assembly of multiple parts? How do they move relative to one another?

             

            Jerry S.

            • Re: Setting up a closed-loop static study
              Samuel Leith

              It's true that at the angle shown in the screenshot, the 'white' part looks more like it's light grey.

              The torque wrench is the one that's light grey.

               

              It's a hydraulic torque wrench. Once the torque wrench is in place, you activate the hydraulic pressure. The entire wrench spins until the reaction arm hits the backplate. From there on out, torque start to build.

              • Re: Setting up a closed-loop static study
                Samuel Leith

                I realized I should have used the term 'internal forces' as opposed to 'closed loop'.

                 

                The majority of the time, when doing FEA, a part/assembly is constrainted and an external load is applied.

                 

                In this case, the loads are internal, which is what is throwing me off a little bit.

                 

                Please have a look at the picture attached, which is an image I found on google of a case similar to mine.

                The blue tool is the hydraulic wrench, which applies a torque on the fixture and also a reaction force (as indicated by the red arrows).

                calibration.jpg

                How would you go about setting up an FEA study to validate the fixture (shown by the green arrow)?

                 

                I've been thinking about this for a week+, and I'm still not sure. There are no external loads on this assembly. If I was strong enough, I could simply put this assembly in the palm of my hand and crank up the hydraulic pressure and it wouldn't go anywhere, or it wouldn't get any harder to hold.

                 

                From what I've tried so far, I know I can't set fixtures on the bottom faces that are in contact with the table because it over-contraints the system. These faces are in fact not constrained and could therefore deform (ie. lose contact with the table).

                 

                What contraints would you use?

                Thanks for your help.

                  • Re: Setting up a closed-loop static study
                    Jerry Steiger

                    Samuel,

                     

                    I'm no expert in using SolidWorks Simulation, but I would just pick a vertex at one of the corners and fix it in X, pick one at another corner and fix it in Y, and pick one at a third corner and fix it in Z. Since the corners are quite a ways away from the areas where the fixture will be stressed, the fixed points probably won't affect the stress much. Since the back corners are closer to the areas of interest, you might consider fixing one front corner in X and Y and the other in Z. Or use the back corner that is hidden in your picture, since the stresses are probably less there than in the corner closest to the reaction arm.

                     

                    Jerry S.

                    • Re: Setting up a closed-loop static study
                      Jared Conway

                      "The blue tool is the hydraulic wrench, which applies a torque on the fixture and also a reaction force (as indicated by the red arrows)."

                       

                      how are these not external forces to the fixture?

                       

                      if there aren't any loads on the fixture, why analyze it?

                    • Re: Setting up a closed-loop static study
                      Samuel Leith

                      Jerry,

                      The vertex initially sounded like a possible option, however, I noticed the displacement results were being affected. The corner points are essentially points which have the largest displacement - so fixing them in space affects the result quite a bit.

                       

                       

                      Jared,

                      By this I meant that the loads are internal to the system. Yes there are loads on the fixture, but all of these loads are applied by the torque wrench: the torque + the reaction force.

                      For example, standing inside a box and pushing on one of its walls versus standing in front of it and pushing on one of its walls are two different situations.

                       

                      Since these loads are internal to the system, there is no constraints to hold the system in place (like bolts for example).

                      Knowing the torque of the torque wrench, the reaction force can easily be calculated.

                      Now in simulation, when setting these two loads (the torque & force), the simulation will not work because there is no constraints.

                       

                      Essentially, I was wondering how to apply constraints without over-contraining.

                      At the end of the day, this L ange fixture can deform in every possible plane because nothing is holding it down.

                       

                      I am not an FEA expert either. I just like to solve problems.

                      • Re: Setting up a closed-loop static study
                        Samuel Leith

                        Sorry for the delay in replying to my own thread :s

                        With your feedback, there are a few test studies I would like to run. I plan on getting to the bottom of this, but I'm doing this during my spare time, so it might take a little longer than usual. I will update the post with my findings.