6 Replies Latest reply on May 12, 2016 6:49 PM by Alin Vargatu

    Hidden line mode, in assemblies, is pretty much useless

    Randy Palmer

      Since day 1 (for me that was 2002), SolidWorks has been inferior in the arena of hidden line mode.  At the time I transitioned, I had used ProE v. 12 to v. 20.  I haven't used ProE since switching to SW (save for perhaps a few times I needed to access some legacy models), but at the time I switched I remember thinking how hard it was to view things like interferences and to mate parts together in SW... all because SW does not automatically assign unique hidden line colors to each part like ProE does (or did).  In ProE, if you had a red part and a green part, the red part's hidden lines would be a suitably distinguishable shade of red, and the green part's hidden lines would be a suitably distinguishable shade of green.

       

      Not so in SW.  By default, each part gets one color (and it's the same color for all parts).  Each part gets (depending upon what you define)... say black visible lines and grey hidden lines.

       

      Now, I fully understand that it is possible to go into each part and set unique color to it, and also to set a unique hidden line color, but what a pain, especially when you have to try and figure out "does this look like a hidden version of the main color".  And what's more, if you happen to change the color of your part, you get to go through that process once again.

       

      I assume this is some gargantuan programming task for the SW developers because they've not figured out how to program it since 2002.  Funny that it was, seemingly, such an easy implementation in ProE that it was standard from day 1... or at least v12.  Maybe now that we're coming up on my 13th anniversary working with SW, they can figure it out?  I'm not hopeful.