10 Replies Latest reply on Oct 2, 2013 8:06 AM by Glenn Schroeder

    Solidworks Beginer

    Ben Calderon

      Looking for some help, hope this is the place to ask, if not my apoligies.

      I have this basic drawing

      my question is how can I have all the vertical lines grow together in height

      and horizontal lines lengthen together in width.

      I am building this as a sign cabinet and would like to use as my template for future drawings.

      I am trying to avoid building this everytime if the cabinet size changes in length or width.

      Thanks

        • Re: Solidworks Beginer
          J. Mather

          I would look into multi-body solids (master) modeling, configurations and possibly Weldments (even if it isn't welded).

           

          I think there are some examples in the Tutorials.

          • Re: Solidworks Beginer
            Joe Kuzich

            Hi Ben,

             

            I'm fairly new myself but I have been working on doing just what your talking about for some of our different products.  I will outline the basics of how I would do it now.  There might (& prob. is) a better to do it so maybe someone else will point that out for both of to learn from.

             

            First I would start off with a sketch in the assembly that shows pretty much everything you show in that image you attached.  Assuming that's say a wall cabinet without doors I would put the sketch on the front elevation.

             

            Second I would sketch it out on the right or top plan if the cabinet depth might change too.  It may just be a simple rectangle.  If the cabinet is not likely to change depth or if you want to make different ones that are not depth changing this step can be avoided. 

             

            Make sure your sketches are dimensioned with the smart dimensions so you can easily change the sketch.

             

            Then as I created the individual parts, I would relate the parts to the sketch in the assembly.  Lets say the top & bottom parts are the same. 

             

            I would create the part with some arbitrary dimensions and insert them into the assembly.  I would make as many of your mates associated with the assembly sketches or planes rather than with other parts if at all possible.

             

            Then I would edit the part in the assembly and link the part sketch to the second assembly sketch (if you created the second one - if not just use the correct dimensions for the depth in the actual part sketch). 

             

            Then I would continue to edit the part in the assembly and change the extrude to link to the first assembly sketch.  I think it's called extruding to a vector point.

             

            Then if you change the assembly sketches the the actual parts change too.  . 

             

            A part/assembly template might be an even better way of doing this but I am not very clear on that yet.  The big draw back of the way I describe above is in the creating of a new size.  Currently I create a pack and go to another file for that specific size.  If you don't have the pack and go add to the files names both files will have the same names.  This is not a problem unless you have one open then try opening the other.  SW gets the files confused sometimes and everything goes crazy.  So I would make the original as say 'cabinet' then have the pack and go add a prefix so the assembly is called '24hx48wx12d cabinet'.  Then all your parts would also have the '24hx48wx12d' prefix.

             

            I hope this helps.  I hope it make sense too if not I will try to clarify or give more detail.

             

            Good luck.

             

            Joe

            • Re: Solidworks Beginer
              Ben Calderon

              Thanks Guys

              heres another picture

              it is a double face cabinet with x bracing all around

                • Re: Solidworks Beginer
                  Erik Bilello

                  One word, weldments.

                  The time taken to figure out weldments and get or make the profiles you are using (if they are not already in the library) will be more than repayed in time saved down the line.  Weldments are not that hard to use and provide some real flexibility even if you are not really welding the parts together.  You can also incorporate formed sheet metal parts into a weldment.

                  • Re: Solidworks Beginer
                    Glenn Schroeder

                    Welcome to the forum.  I agree wholeheartedly with Erik.  That's what Weldments are made for.  Use that function to create this as a single multi-body part.  You can easily detail individual bodies in a drawing, but for most of the ones in your screenshot all of the information needed could be called out in a weldment cut list without needing to be detailed.  And cut lists will update to reflect design changes.

                     

                    If you need an assembly instead of a single part for some other reason, you can seperate the bodies into seperate parts and create an assembly with them after you're finished creating the part.

                      • Re: Solidworks Beginer
                        Joe Kuzich

                        Erik & Glenn,

                         

                        For the second one that becomes a bit more complicated I can totally see using the weldments, but would you still use them on the first one that looked like just a few simple rectangle blocks?  If so, why?  I'm just trying to understand when it makes sense to switch over.  To me the first one looked like it might be a simple wood/plywood cabinet.  If you used weldments there wouldn't the weldments themselves have to be changes in order to facilitate a size change?  With the second the weldments are tied directly to the sketch but as the sketch changes the weldments only lengthen making it work very nicely.  Or am I missing something with the first one?  Although now that I think about it I am making an ___ out of myself by making an assumption, since it could be all L-angle given I only see an elevation.

                         

                        Joe

                          • Re: Solidworks Beginer
                            Glenn Schroeder

                            Joe,

                             

                            Even if that's a simple cabinet frame, with 3/4" x 2-1/4" wood styles, if I was doing them all the time I believe I would use Weldments.  I think just having a cut-list that would parametrically call out the size and length for the parts would be reason enough, but it would also make it much easier to miter joints, and I'm pretty sure it would be quicker than extruding each body seperately.

                             

                            If your method works for you, that's fine, but I don't see any reason to make that an assembly.  You might want to have your doors as seperate parts in an assembly, but I would definitely have anything that doesn't need to move as a multi-body part.

                              • Re: Solidworks Beginer
                                Joe Kuzich

                                Glenn,

                                 

                                Makes sense, especially when miters are introduced.  They are not hard by any means just a little time consuming.  Times the number of miters though it can add up.  I may to give it a try both ways and time the difference it takes me.  Any little improvement is worth investigating, cause those add up too.  Thanks for your insight.

                                 

                                Joe

                                  • Re: Solidworks Beginer
                                    Glenn Schroeder

                                    Joe Kuzich wrote:

                                     

                                    Glenn,

                                     

                                    I may to give it a try both ways and time the difference it takes me.

                                     

                                     

                                    If you do please post back and let us know how it goes, or if you have any questions.  I think you'll like using Weldments;  I use them all the time and wouldn't want to have to do without.

                          • Re: Solidworks Beginer
                            Ben Calderon

                            Good Morning everyone,

                            Weldments worked perfect for what I needed. I am able to edit the sketch and lengthen the cabinet by changing horizontal dimension or shorten and heighten by changing vertical dimension. Thanks everyone