3 Replies Latest reply on Oct 1, 2013 4:47 PM by Jerry Steiger

    Multiple Users Slowing Down Progress

    Chris Buckley

      We have 4 to 5 PC's running solidworks. All drawings being created are connected to the 1 general arrangement drawing (GA). As the GA increases in size everyones PC's are getting slower, the system being used is big enough to handle the load with each PC using 12GB, connected to its own designated main drive. All the work is being edited and saved on the main drive. Should we be working from our personal PC's or does the system need some sort of updating or rebooting at the end of every day?

        • Re: Multiple Users Slowing Down Progress
          Jerry Steiger

          Chris,

           

          When you say that all the drawings are connected to the GA drawing, what, exactly, does that mean? Does everybody have to have the main assembly open to work on their drawings?

           

          Working off of a network drive does seem to cause problems. I have never done it, so have no experiences to relate, but I read here about other people having trouble. It's hard to say without knowing how your company works to say if you would be better off working locally or not. Personally, I think every company with more than one employee working on SolidWorks should have PDM, where you work on a local copy and check into a vault. In fact, if I were working by myself, I would use PDM to make revision change history easier.

           

          If you are working on large assemblies or complex parts, I think it is a good idea to reboot your computer daily. There have been times, back in the 32 bit days when I was working on some particularly hard stuff, when I had to reboot several times a day to keep SW happy.

           

          SolidWorks drawings of large assemblies seem to be an area that causes people more trouble than most. It seems to be best to keep drawings as simple as possible. Putting all of the drawings for a large assembly in one multi-sheet drawing seems to be inviting trouble.

           

          Jerry S.

            • Re: Multiple Users Slowing Down Progress
              Chris Buckley

              Jerry,

               

              Thank you for your response it is a great help. To answer your question; each draugthsman creates an assembly of whats required, wether it be platform, walkway, stairway, pipe work etc., and then inserts the item into the Building Site G.A. (General arrangement drawing) which is the bases of which all drawings are developed from. We each have to seperately gain full access to the G.A. (which is really a very large assembly) after our individual assemblies are complete and insert them as this is then the finished product.

               

              We have realised that we should all be working locally on our own PC's and not on a network drive. It slows down regenerating and  when saving all parts and assemblies. A lesson which will be hard learned by the time the job is finished but at this late stage we just have to persevere.

               

              The PDM you mentioned, does this require a single license for all users or multiple licenses for all users?

               

              Why is it inviting trouble putting all drawings for a large assembly on one multi-sheet? I'm assuming your talking about creating multiple Sheets for our G.A. with sectional views etc., all on the one drawing? We possibly require 10 different title sheets or more to complete the job.

               

              Again, thank you for your earlier response.

                • Re: Multiple Users Slowing Down Progress
                  Jerry Steiger

                  Chris,

                   

                  PDM typically requires one license per user. The easiest way to go is to upgrade from SolidWorks Standard to SolidWorks Professional, which gives you a license for Workgroup PDM, along with a number of other features that you may or may not be interested in. You can also go with other PDM systems, such as dbWorks or Activault or a number of others. (I mention those two only because I happen to remember their names.)

                   

                  SolidWorks doesn't handle large drawings very well and the more sheets you add to a drawing, the more trouble you have. As you add sheets, drawing seem to slow down in an exponential fashion. So, rather than put all of your drawings into one giant drawing with a multitude of sheets, you would be much better off to have drawings for subassemblies, keeping each drawing to just a few sheets. Put only the information that you can't put into a subassembly drawing on the main assembly drawing.

                   

                  One particular hazard is the possibility that a drawing file can be corrupted. The larger the drawing file is, the more likely that it will eventually be corrupted and the more you lose and have to redraw when it happens.

                   

                  Jerry S.