4 Replies Latest reply: Jun 27, 2013 8:11 AM by Derek Parks

    How to Animate Spring (like attached video)

    Derek Parks

      I am trying to figure out how this compression spring was actually completed in Composer. In the past I was told that such movement was impossible without "faking" and this does not appear to be a "fake". I have done adjusting of the scale in the past and also using separate .smg files from configurations in Solidworks to "fake" these such movements but never with any success of this quality. Adjusting scale will not give you actual compression which was achieved somehow  in this video and several .smg files fading in and out I suppose could work with a astronomical amount of different .smg files. I highly doubt that is what was done since several springs compress at once and I would think it would leave a huge file. If anyone could give me some information on how this might have been achieved I would greatly appreciate it. It may be a combo of adjusting several different properties that I just can't seem to get the right combo during my tests. This is by far the most realistic compression I have seen in Composer and it was just uploaded today so I am very curious how it was done.

       

      Thanks for everyone's help

       

      Derek

       

        • Re: How to Animate Spring (like attached video)
          Earl Hasz

          Derek,

          The springs were animated by changing the value of the axial scale property or their local axis scale.  This value can be changed during the animation to simulate the compression of a spring.  If the scale change is not too great, the flattening due to the scaling will not be apparent to the viewer.

           

          -Earl

            • Re: How to Animate Spring (like attached video)
              Derek Parks

              Earl,

               

              The way you have described is the way I have always done and been told by several Composer users that this is the only way to do it. Although I agree that the flattening of the spring may be masked by the viewer in certain locations I have to second guess this is the case in this animation.

               

              If you look very closely at any of the springs individually they are actually compressing. Unless I am missing something this can't be achieved with simple scaling of the axis ( at least I have never been able to accomplish this). When I scale the axis on my springs the space between the rings stays the same and the diameter of the wire changes to make it look like it is compressing. By looking at the larger sectioned spring at the top of the attached animation the wire diameter never changes which i don't see is possible with scaling.

               

              If you could please explain step by step how this would be done I would greatly appreciate it. I have been using Composer for over 2 years and have yet to get a spring of this quality. I can upload a few videos I have made in the past using the scaling described and it looks nothing like this even with an inch of compression and he achieved at least 3 inches in his springs. One even sectioned and no flattening of the wire is visible. Any advice would be appreciated and thanks for taking the time to help me.

               

              Derek

                • Re: How to Animate Spring (like attached video)
                  Earl Hasz

                  I have taken a closer look at this.  I believe that the "section" that you see is actually a cut model.  This will allow the individual coils of the spring to move independently.  The valve springs are a bit more challenging.  I have a couple of ideas that I would like to try before writing them down.  In the end I believe that the valve springs are equally cut and moved individually.  The key is how the assembly structure looks in Composer to help simplify the keyframes.  I'll get back with a video showing the process of setting up my solution.

                    • Re: How to Animate Spring (like attached video)
                      Derek Parks

                      Earl,

                       

                      I appreciate you researching this for me. I have been in contact with the producer of this video I attached and you are correct. I am glad that I have found an answer but I was looking forward to being able to do this kind of motion without having to "fake" it. I was able to recreate the spring video doing precisely what you and the animator of the video explained. It seems you beat me into the post this morning before I was able to let you know.  Again I really appreciate you taking the time to help me with this.

                       

                      Derek