1 Reply Latest reply on Jun 5, 2013 12:42 PM by Laura Whittle

    Group Permissions vs. User Permissions

    Kevin Stickels

      Has anyone in the forums run into this situation?

       

      I have set up the various workflows, permissions, etc. by Group. However, when the users within the group try to change states, transitions, etc. They get the dialog indicating they do not have permissions. I open the groups (then the user) and it indicates that they have default access. But, I can only get their permissions to work correctly if I go through each user and check the boxes for each permission that is also showing as default. Also, I give Read/Rename/Delete permissions on a folder which should then propagate to the lower subfolders and files, correct? But, the permissions are not flowing downhill.

       

      We have a most stringent IT security but they assure me that nothing is in place which might cause this. I am awaiting input form the VAR also. I just wondered if anyone out there has run into this before?

       

      Thanks 

        • Re: Group Permissions vs. User Permissions
          Laura Whittle

          We also have our permissions based on groups.  I haven't had the need to give permission individually.  We are on ePDM 2013.

           

          I would check to make sure the group has permissions in the folder first, then check the transition they are trying to use, and then the state the transition is going to.

           

          I have found subfolders will inherit the parent folder's permissions, untill you change that subfolders permission specifically. Once you change it, it will not gain the parent's folder permission. ( it has been a while so I'm not 100% sure, but I believe the only way to get the subfolder to inherit again is if you change the permissions back to the parent's folder or delete all permissions for parent and sub and start over.)

          We have a pretty rigid folder structure and the only way to add a folder is via a template and can only be done in specific areas.