7 Replies Latest reply on May 7, 2013 3:44 PM by Jared Conway

    Split a flow into two streams

    Matthew Schladt

      All,

       

      Thank you for taking the time.  I would like to do something in solidworks flow simulation that is easier said than done.  Essentially, I would like to have one gas inlet that is forced to split into two directions.  I would like to manipulate the percentage of the flow that goes one way or the other.  I've been looking for 3-way valves, or manual valves, but have had no success.

       

      I have been doing the initial work by inputting the two flows as two different inlets, but the problem is that I am trying to find the generated pressure thru this one side of the system and having a defined inlet forces me to specify a pressure.

       

      I hope I'm not being too vague and I would appreciate some feedback,

       

      Thanks,

      Matt

        • Re: Split a flow into two streams
          Jared Conway

          If a valve controls the flow in the physical situation, you need a valve in flow to control it. There is no cable element or similar that you can drop in to virtualized it. It sounds like an interesting idea though.

           

          What is the long term plan for you analysis? That night help us come up with an alternative. A diagram would be helpful.

            • Re: Split a flow into two streams
              Matthew Schladt

              I'm sorry, I'm a little hesitant to drop my project in or pictures due to proprietary info.  To your question on the long-term plan... one path has a unique injector style and I am manipulating the geometry of this injector to improve mixing and reduce heat loss.  Like I said in the original post, I am trying to find out the pressure drop in this injector as it will run in the actual system and specifying a pressure as a separate variable is not so great.

               

              Is there a web-site that you can recommend that I can find a 3-way valve?  My solidworks skills aren't so great to make a valve myself.

               

              Thank you,

              Matt

                • Re: Split a flow into two streams
                  Jared Conway

                  you can try 3d content central or grabcad.

                   

                  regarding the proprietary nature of your problem, that can easily be worked around by making a general example without your geometry. a drawing would probably be enough. it might also be helpful if you show what you would use as conditions if you were going to do a hand calculation.

                    • Re: Split a flow into two streams
                      Matthew Schladt

                      Here's the diagram of the general flow path I am trying to replicate.  I have 100slpm at around 20psi that enters the valve that splits the flow.  The one path leads to the injector in which I am trying to modify the design.  I am extremely interested in the pressure drop in this injector especially when the flow thru this is high.  I am also interested in the mixing if the split is low to the injector.

                       

                      Who knew that the injection design would be the easy part?  I can't believe I'm getting so hung up on the valve.

                       

                      I appreciate your advice on the 3d content central, I will spend some time this morning going thru those web-sites to see if I can find something useful for this.Split Flow.png

                        • Re: Split a flow into two streams
                          Jared Conway

                          What is the big blue box? Do you care about what happens in it? Or is that where you are interested in the mixing?

                           

                          It seems like you might be over thinking things. If the injector is the part you're trying to improve, run different pressure drops/flows through it. Adding the valve means having to analyze it as we'll adding to the analysis overhead. It seems like there should be data that tells you what the outputs are at each setting. That being said, having the valve is interesting because it may affect the flow pattern into the injector depending on the length of tubing in between the parts. But to make everything realistic, you need the exact valve geometry.