4 Replies Latest reply on Mar 5, 2013 9:17 PM by Jared Conway

    I have problem ,assembly

    Minduks Liortabukas

      I am begginer user, i am trying to simulate conical fittings to nut, i have problems with mesh and contact set. First i can't find any contact, (see picture), and i can't to create mesh.( see picture). Where is problem, thanks.

       

      pav.1.PNG

      picture2.PNG

        • Re: I have problem ,assembly
          Irfan Zardadkhan

          Hi Minduks,

          As the message suggests, you have interfering bodies, you may need to recheck the mates/ redo an interference check before you can perform the simulation. What type of contact condition do you need between the bodies?

            • Re: I have problem ,assembly
              Minduks Liortabukas

              Hello Irfan, thanks of post, but i am begginer , that was mate problem, i corrected, but now solidworks is writing :may not have adequate restraints? where is problem siusti2.PNG

                • Re: I have problem ,assembly
                  Irfan Zardadkhan

                  Try to add a manual bonded contact between the 2 bodies. It seems the 2 bodies are not touching now. If there is some clearance between the two bodeis, the global contact will not work.

                    • Re: I have problem ,assembly
                      Jared Conway

                      Irfan is right on here. Run the interference detection tool with the "include multibodies" option enabled. Make sure none of the parts are interfering. Otherwise you're going to upset the solver. (The only time that interferences should exist is if you're going to use a shrink fit) Once you're good there, run the same interference detection and choose "treat coincidence as interference". All of your parts should be touching somewhere for the global bonded contact to work. If they aren't, they either need to be bonded together with a bonded contact set pair or with a connector of some sort. Remember that if you use a bonded contact set, they need to be relatively close together. Probably on the order of 1 element size. Also, be aware that this might stiffen things up a bit.