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Oddities - Sheet Metal Edition

Question asked by Gerald Davis on Oct 19, 2012
Latest reply on Dec 4, 2012 by Andy Gordon

I was recently sitting at the elbow of a CNC programmer staring at a UI when a part arrived via the Internet.  The intent was to create a flat layout for fabrication.  The imported solid was in need of ripping before SW could add sheet metal functionality to it.  Here is a link to my magazine article that describes some of the resulting fluff and bother.

http://www.thefabricator.com/article/forengineers/3-d-cad-handling-imported-data-during-sheet-metal-design

 

Looking forward to peer review on that one!  In a way, it is an enhancement request for easier ways to get ripped.

 

I am very interested in learning from you.  I need better (automatic) techniques for accomplishing the chore of massaging ingénue imports into well behaved production models. 

 

CAD models are routinely sent to the cloud for fabrication.  Many are native to low end OtherCAD and violate all rules of sheet metal.  Converting such CAD approximations into manufacturable items can require an artful use of skill.  Hybrid modeling techniques (ala Matt Lombard) help - e.g. sometimes it is easier to convert a surface into sheet metal than it is to sort out all of the wall thickness inconsistencies in the original CAD blob. 

 

Delete Face is often my best friend.

 

Is (are) there new sheet metal functionality(s) that I'm missing?  Please help an old dog learn new tricks.

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