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Ranking SW command importance by its "age"?

Question asked by Qi Lu on Sep 17, 2012
Latest reply on Sep 18, 2012 by Qi Lu

Hi,

 

I seem to have found a good way to learn solidworks.

 

Matt Lombard in Introduction of Solidworks 2010 Bible:
 

SolidWorks is such an immense soft-ware program that trying to cover all its functions is an extremely ambitious undertak-ing, which has resulted me leaving a few out.

And meremly under "features" there are 41 different and several of them have not be included in the ribbon by default.

1.jpg

Matt's book is indeed a good reference in that it covers most of the features Solidworks includes (excepts for add-ins), but just as he said in

Introduction of Solidworks 2010 Bible:
  

This book has been written as a desk reference for beginning and intermediate SolidWorks users.

I have found it is very inefficient to learn each of the topics, even if I skip lots of chapters. For example,

deform

flex

indent

 

are all listed in chapter 7 which is qutie among the front part of the book and for such a reason I deem them as important. However, these features are not included in the "Feature" ribbon by default and I have found them more difficult to grasp than other functions. There are many topics in the book like this and I found that it might be better if I have a criterion to judge certain function's importance.

 

In reply to Functionality expansion history of Solidworks Alin Vargatu referred me to the "What's New Guides" collection which listed the software's user guide and what's new manual from version 95 to 2012. I downloaded and combined 22 files into a single PDF. And when I later see a topic in Matt's book and want's to judge if a function needs to be prioritized for study, I simply search the combined PDF. For example:

 

 

First come in

In default ribbon?

deform

2004

No

flex

2005

No

indent

2005

No

scale

99

No

 

Because Deform, Flex and Indent are added very late, I infer that they might not be the very essential functions, and the fact that they are not listed in default ribbon provides some additional support for that; for "Scale" however, although it not in the ribbon by default, it comes pretty (version 99), so I infer that it might be of moderate importance.

 

So far this method works for me, and I just rank the topics within each of Matt's book chapter I am reading and tries to sort out a priority list first. It is something just like many textbooks would give difficulty indication of problems in the form of number of stars "", "","","","", and the only difference here is that ranking is done partly by the year when the functionality is added, or just its "age".

 

I actually wish if Matt had alredy already done such a "importance ranking" in his book which would kindly provide a better readers a quicker and mroe efficient path to follow; as a generalization, I also believe the method can be expanded to the learning of other software, especially for those whose size and functionality are on the same scale as Solidworks.

 

I wish to hear anyone's comments on this idea.

 

 

Qi

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