8 Replies Latest reply on Dec 9, 2012 3:16 PM by Scott Manktelow

    Assembly Path Mates - Roller Shutter

    Scott Manktelow

      Hi all, I have been lurking in the backround for ages reading up on the advice people are suggesting so I thought I get started & post an item I'm having difficulty with and hopfully get some advice.

       

      I have modeled up a pretty basic model of a roller shutter from one or our suppliers and was hoping to Pack & Go it each time we manufacture a different size cabinet and adjust the aperture size to suit. I have set up some equations for door height and width (aperture size) and these adjust the slat/lower locking mechanism, storage tube and flag plate/guide channel dimensions and these appear to be working well.

       

      My questions are as follows:

       

      1. I am new to using the path mate but I have have created a path in the assembly using a surface (found that suggestion on the forums, works great!) and have put a sketch in the slats to use a path mate so the slats actually roll up. Now this does work with 1 -3 slats but after 3 are mated in it will not follow the path, they also flip inside out (which may because its mated using sketch points?) and if I apply a secont path mate to each slat it errors out and becomes overdefined. Is there a setting that I can change in the mates section or a different way of doing this to achieve the desired affect?

       

      2.  The second question, I would like to have the assembly so you only have to change the apertue size dimensions and the rest updates automatically. The equations I put in work fine but how can I get it to update the number of slats and have them mated with the above path mate. I have looked and read a bit on feature patterns but not sure if this can be applied here. Mating each slat is okay but we do create some large cabinets with more than one size door so this could be rather time consuming. I may be asking too much here or it could be very simple.

       

      Please see attached assembly.

       

      Your help and suggestions would be much appreciated.

       

      Scott Manktelow

        • Re: Assembly Path Mates - Roller Shutter
          Alin Vargatu

          Nice application!

          Note: I used SW 2012 SP 4.0 for playing with this assembly.

           

          1. I added one more slat, using SW 2012 and everything works fine. It does follow the path nicely if dragging the top most slat. You can drag the other ones too, as long as you do it slowly, so SW has time to recalculate the mates as you drag. Moving too fast might flip the position (this is not flipping the mates, since both positions are geometrically correct). Maybe adding some distance limit mates might help in stopping the flipping.

           

          2. I would imagine that without using DriveWorks or a custom macro, you might want to start from an extreme example (maximum number of slats) and start suppressing them as you go to smaller sizes.

            • Re: Assembly Path Mates - Roller Shutter
              Scott Manktelow

              Thanks for your reply Alin, and yes dragging it slowly does help. I have 11 slats mated in now but as I drag the top slat just over the roller on the flag plate it won't continue any further . Do you think the chain of mates may be too long and gets to a point where it restricts itself going any further?

               

              With your answer to #2, is it possible to link the suppression state of a component to dimensions or is this where the macro or drive works would have to be introduced/

               

              Thanks,

              Scott

            • Re: Assembly Path Mates - Roller Shutter
              Alin Vargatu

              If simulating the motion dynamically via mates is not paramount for you and you need just a correct drawing and a nice cut list/BOM, then you might want to consider doing everything in a multibody part. Main advantages:

               

              1. Can use structural members

              2. Have acces to the spectacular "curve driven pattern" (it will solve the main issue)

              3. No more need for mates

              4. Much easier to automate

              5. Simplified file management

                • Re: Assembly Path Mates - Roller Shutter
                  Scott Manktelow

                  Yes this does seem like the next best option I think for practicality. You are right in saying that simulating the motion isn't paramount, it was just the main challenge I was hoping to overcome. It is a shame there's no access to the curve driven pattern in an assembly, I could have used it on a number of occasions.

                    • Re: Assembly Path Mates - Roller Shutter
                      Kalair Antarpreet

                      Hi scott,

                      I have an exact same door mechanism like yours but with smaller slats and its for use in fire trucks. I would like to ask you that how do you have your door rolling up...i mean are you using just a spiral path on the top where it rolls up or have you done something to roll it like it does in real life (one layer over the other). Just wanted my door to work like that but dont know how to start going into that direction any help would be greatly appreciated.

                      thanks

                        • Re: Assembly Path Mates - Roller Shutter
                          Scott Manktelow

                          Hi Kalair,

                           

                          Sorry for the late reply. It took a bit of nutting out at first but I ended doing the model as a top down assembly with some in context because I wanted to be able to control the size of the assembly using a sketch of the aperture size. To control the path of the shutters I did a sketch in a part and used a helix/spiral to give me the path and then did a surface sweep along the sketch. Now this is not the exact path the shutters would follow but it was enough to give me approx the correct rolled diameter and the impression of the shutter rolling up. Inside the slat models I sketch two circles at the correct pitch to give me the slat spacing and in the assembly I mated the the circles concentric from one slat to the next. In the same sketch there are some construction lines I used to mate to the surface sweep using a path mate. the easiest thing may be to download the model break it down and see if you can follow how I built it.

                           

                          If you are going to use this type of door regularly on your product I would probably advise making a simpler part model with open and closed configurations. Still make it so you can control it by aperture size so its easy and quick. I think you will end up with less errors in the long term this way.

                           

                          Scott