7 Replies Latest reply on Apr 10, 2012 3:28 PM by Bill McEachern

    Which Edition for Education Use?

    John Avery

      Hello all,

       

      I'm a fairly new educator teaching advanced CAD design to High School Students.  I've been working with the idea of doing basic turbine design with the students to get an appreciation for fluid flow in CAD without having to fuss with Fluid Mechanics.  I use SolidWorks personally on a regular basis, but have never delved into FloXpress nor Flow Simulation.  To my current understanding, FloXpress is limited in that you can define inlets and outlets, and boundary conditions, but that you can do very little internally - is this correct?  I'm also under the current understanding that Flow Simulation is a completely separate module from SolidWorks (which comes with FloXpress by default), and would need to be purchased separately.  (Making sure of this in case I need to make a software pitch to the School Disctrict for an Educational License for this.)

       

      The particular design goals would be the following:

       

      1:  Design a fan using swept extrusions.

      2:  Make a simple pin joint for it to revolve around mechanically.

      3:  Given input conditions (Ambient Air Pressure, Temp, Propeerties), use SolidWorks to generate Fluid Path Motion when the Fan is placed in and around different obstacles  (IE: In an enclosure, or having multiple fans close together, having geographical features ahead or behind the fan, or open space entirely, and analyzing how this effects the flow.

      4.  Place "Heat Elements" in and around the fan to observe how that effects flow (Convection, Radiation, Conduction, etc) - IE: A Chilling Tower for a Computer Center, placing "Blocks" that generate Heat around the fans to observe heat dissipation.

       

      It is my current understanding that the above goals cannot be achieved by FloXpress because FloXpress is not capable of handling Airflow based on Dynamic Geometry (Rotating Blades), nor can you define heat generating elements.

       

      Any help would be appreciated!  Admittedly I'm rather excited to have found out about Flow Simulation - SolidWorks is by far the best 3D CAD program I've worked with, and my kids have been itching to get into some more exciting, "relevant" topics to their interests.  (I have students who'd love to do Airfoil design, others work on Turbines, a couple of kids want to design a "Marketable" computer case.  Apparently one of the students found the Ball-Valve Tutorial in the SolidWorks files and alerted me to the existence of this program.)

          • Re: Which Edition for Education Use?
            John Avery

            Wonderful!  now I just need to track down the particular IT person who holds the precious installation information to get him / her to install the complete package on the lab computers!  (Currently only 2009 SP.01 is installed on the systems, with no access to Flow Simulation)

              • Re: Which Edition for Education Use?
                Bill McEachern

                it gets better. It is already installed. You just have to turn it on - tool-.add ins-. enable flow sim or floworks depending onwhat it is called. It is near the bottom. You are too ambitious on the simulations for the student. Spinning things are complicated......check the manuals inthe installation directory. they are down deep but close where your student found the tutorial files. Ifhe found the tutorial manula you in the rght spot. There are many verification problems and the files are there as well. Pick your phenom and have them run the case.......would be my suggestion. Miriale if you can keep them in engaged in this for any length of time.....way to go for the effort.

                  • Re: Which Edition for Education Use?
                    John Avery

                    Bear in mind though that they won't be doing calculations, this is more just a qualitative look for exploration and understanding.  I haven't tried it yet, but having fiddled with FloXpress a little bit, I can't imagine there is really much complication to having it run the analysis on a rotating object?  They'll only be required to create a fan of their design choices in cad, but it has to be able to fit / mate onto my base part and within specified dimensions. 

                     

                    As it is, these students have already done motion analysis on Fourbar mechanisms.  In the end however, using one of the tutorials might be easier on my troubleshooting end.  These are fairly ambitious students in a second-year CAD program, part of the Pre-Engineering track at the High School.

                     

                    Though, I've yet to try any open-air analysis yet with this.  I've only been doing closed loops, which are easy to attach lids to / assign BCs.

                     

                    Wow.  My goodness.  These kids are going to murder me - Right there in Add-Ins.  Already installed.  They've been wanting to screw around with this for well over a week and I've been telling them that it's more than likely a separate license and it might be months / years before the budget gets room for that sort of thing.

                      • Re: Which Edition for Education Use?
                        Bill McEachern

                        the rotating frame approximation is used in Flow Sim. It adds some complications but if you go trough the tutorials you should be able to figure it out. Hint: you need to enclose the rotor in a volume of revolution that will act to define the boundary between the rotating region and the stationary frame.....\

                         

                        external analysis are simpler than the internal - no lids required.

                          • Re: Which Edition for Education Use?
                            John Avery

                            Indeed - thanks for the tips and advice.  Big "Doh!" Moment when I found that in Add-Ins like you instructed.

                             

                            I'm willing to indulge these students a bit because this is the most motivated group I've had since I began teaching, so if I have to do a bit more work, so be it.  These guys are doing CAD work of better quality than many top Engineering Undergrads I've seen.  The most humbling part is this is the first time since I began teaching where I ran into a "Kids know more than me about using software" moment.  I knew it was coming, but one is never prepared for it!