6 Replies Latest reply on Mar 12, 2013 4:06 PM by Jerry Steiger

    Recommended books on FEA

    Jason Richardson

      Jumping the gap between obtaining a degree in mech.engineering and actually becoming an engineer has certainly hit home during my first month of employment since my graduation.

       

      As my experience with FEA increases, it seems my confidence in its results, and in my self, has been on the decline. Ideally I'd have an experienced colleague around to give me some guidance and show me the ropes, but this is unfortunately not the case and leaves me in somewhat of a rut.

       

      I think a general FEA book with no emphasis on particular CAD packages would be most benefitial, while also keeping practical and not delving too deep into the underlying mathematics. The problem is, there are dozens of these available and I have absolutely no idea which would be the most worthwhile place to start.

       

      Peterson's concentration factors has been a great help with regards to hand calculations, and I'm really looking for the equivelant in FEA terms. Advice and suggestions from anyone, particularly those who been in my position would be fantastic.

        • Re: Recommended books on FEA
          Kevin De Smet

          I would be equally interested, i find lots of traditional books on FEA to be too heavy on the mathematics and seems to have been written for code developers rather than software users! but i'd like to chip in what I can, do a Google search for "the cosmos companion" which was a small series of articles on various topics regarding simulation in SolidWorks.

           

          Cosmos was the old name for SolidWorks Simulation so you should be able to follow along really well even though it's a few years old. There was also Cosmos/M but that's not discussed so (since that product is dead, or pretty much dead) that's a good thing!

          • Re: Recommended books on FEA
            Jerry Steiger

            Jason,

             

            I remember a number of years ago that someone I trusted suggested a book by Vince Adams. A Google search turned up Building Better Products with Finite Element Analysis, puslished in 1998, which seems about right. It gets pretty good reviews on Amazon. The bad news in one sense is that it isn't cheap, at over $100 for a used book. The good news is that it's probably a pretty good book if people are willing to pay that much for it.

             

            Jerry Steiger

            • Re: Recommended books on FEA
              Dave Laban

              I have recently acquired a copy of the NAFEMS Finite Element Primer book - I have only had a quick skim of it so far but it does appear to be an excellent resource for providing more info on FE methods without drowning you in maths.

               

              http://nafems.org/publications/browse_buy/linear/fep/

               

              Hope that helps!

              • Re: Recommended books on FEA
                Roland Schwarz

                As my experience with FEA increases, it seems my confidence in its results, and in my self, has been on the decline.

                This is actually very healthy.  Always be skeptical of results, until you have experience correlating results to physical tests and examples.

                Ideally I'd have an experienced colleague around to give me some guidance and show me the ropes, but this is unfortunately not the case and leaves me in somewhat of a rut.

                Vince Adams was a big proponent of this.  Analysts typically work in a vacuum.  It's very difficult to find experienced FEA mentors within a workplace, because they are so few and far between.  If you must (and you must), look outside the workplace to find someone.

                 

                Remember that results are as valid as the assumptions in the model.

                • Re: Recommended books on FEA
                  Keith Frankie

                  http://www.clear.rice.edu/mech517/FEAC_final.pdf also on google books and for sale on Amazon

                   

                  Finite Element Analysis Concepts via SolidWorks by J. Ed Akin

                   

                  SW is just a tool; if you know SW already why not read a FEA book that uses the tool you know?

                    • Re: Recommended books on FEA
                      Jerry Steiger

                      Keith,

                       

                      Thanks for the link. Also very nice of the professor to make the text available. I found the following on page 7:

                       

                      "An FEA always involves a number of uncertainties that impact the accuracy or

                      reliability of each stage of an FEA and its results. The book, Building Better Products with Finite Element Analysis by Adams and Askenazi [1] gives an outstanding detailed description of most of the real-world uncertainties associated with solid mechanics FEA. All engineers conducting stress studies should read it. That book also points out how poor solid modeling skills can adversely affect the ability to construct meshes for any type of FEA."

                       

                      Later, on page 25, he says:

                       

                      "In the author’s opinion, the book by Adams and Askenazi [1] is one of the best practical overviews of the interaction of modern solid modeling (SM) software and general finite element software (such as SW Simulation), and the many pitfalls that will plague many beginners. It points out that almost all FE studies involve assumptions and approximations and the user of such tools should be conscious of them and address them in any analysis or design report. You are encouraged to read it."

                       

                      You can't get an endorsement much better than that, but the Adams and Askenazi paperback will still set you back from $125 to $1300 on Amazon. I think that Akin does a pretty good job of pointing out the pitfalls. At $55 for a harback on Amazon or free for the download from Rice, his book is a bargain.

                       

                      Jerry S.