3 Replies Latest reply on Oct 14, 2011 3:07 PM by Robert Stupplebeen

    Lofting a Canoe need help!!

    Michael Laz

      I am working on a model of a Canoe for one of my friends school projects and I am running into an issue. I haven't played around with lofts too much and I am unsure why this is not working. I have several planes with section profiles and I am trying to loft them all together. This model will be going to a mold shop and the shop will be making a MALE mold of this, so the only thing that matters is the outside dimensions, not the inside. Also the front and back of the canoe need to be radiused like a normal canoe would be like. Any suggestions on how to get this to work would be appreciated. Attached is some jpegs of what i am dealing with.Canoe_Hull_Gunwale_.25_Offset.JPGCanoe_Hull_Gunwale_.25_Offset_2.JPGCanoe_Hull_Gunwale_.25_Offset_5.JPGCanoe_Hull_Gunwale_.25_Offset_6.JPG

        • Re: Lofting a Canoe need help!!
          Jerry Steiger

          Michael,

           

          A few things to add to Ben's tutorial that Kelvin showed you.It's a good idea to minimize the number of profiles. You might even be able to get away with less than Ben used. More profiles tend to lead to kinky surfaces. Similarly, minimize the number of spline points. More points tend to lead to kinky splines. Ben didn't discuss tangencies, but you need to make the splines perpendicular to the center plane unless you want a kink at the center of the canoe. Similarly, the Loft (or Boundary Surface) needs to be perpendicular to the end profile at the middle of the canoe, assuming that you mirror it as Ben did.

           

          You may want to use a Boundary Surface instead of a Loft. They tend to be more stable and well controlled. You might also want to Loft only to the last section before the end, then use a Fill Surface for the End.

           

          You might want to use Guide Curves for a Loft, or curves running lengthwise for a Boundary Surface. You don't need to, but it might make more sense depending on what part of the shape you most want to control.

           

          Jerry Steiger

          • Re: Lofting a Canoe need help!!
            Robert Stupplebeen

            Just to add a little.  Use symmetry werever possible.  It makes for less work and assures that the part is symmetric.  Using a boundary surface skipping the first and last profiles looks to be fairly clean already.  Nice job.  I hope this helps.

            Rob Stupplebeen

            Canoe_Hull_Gunwale_RStupplebeen.jpg