2 Replies Latest reply on Jul 11, 2011 10:25 PM by Chris Partee

    Thermomechanical Properties of Integrated Circuit Components

    Chris Partee

      Hello,

       

      I am modeling an assembly that I wish to do thermal analysis on the PCB(s) and its components.   My problem is that I don't have a good source for determining the thermomechanical properties (i.e. specific heat, CTE, and thermal conductivity) for the circuit board components.    Does anyone know of a good resource?

       

      Thanks,

      -Chris

        • Re: Thermomechanical Properties of Integrated Circuit Components
          Ron Reiners

          Chris,

           

          You have a couple of options. 1. Solidworks Flow already has some information loaded in the database for pc boards, although I don't think it is very correct but it is a good starting point. Look in the Flow Simulation | Tools | Engineering Database under Materials | solids | Pre-Defined | Non-isotropic and you will find 3 PCB configurations.

           

          The other method which takes a lot longer is to start calling the local representative for the manufacturer of the raw material that will be used in your pc board. This is not the vendor of the pc board but the manufacturer of the glass resin fiberglass material. You will have to explain what you need the information for as a lot of times they want this information to remain proprietary

           

          As for the add on components, I use Alumina 96% Al2O3 for ceramic chip components like resistors and capacitors. For IC's I use a combination of Epoxy, unfilled die encapsulate for the plastic body  and copper for the leads and surface mount pads.

           

          Also remember whenever possible try to test you model against a known result.

           

          I also attached a spreadsheet with the numbers that I use. You can use these at your own risk as I cannot guarantee if they are 100% accurate.

           

          Also, my other main source is www.matweb.com

           

          Hope this gets you started.

           

          Regards,

           

          Ron