11 Replies Latest reply on Dec 18, 2010 8:57 AM by Matthew Perez

    My latest stump...

    Rich Bolduc

      So i'm slowly becoming more comfortable with surfacing but just got stumped again at work.  Working on a cover for a gooseneck that has a patternt in it.  What would be the best way to add this pattern?

       

      Attached is a png with the cut's i'm trying to figure out how to do and also the model they'll be going in.

       

      Any advice would be a huge help because as usualy, they told me 3 days to get something done that they needed for 2 weeks ago....  *sigh*

       

       

        Thanks in advance... and I'll buy who ever can help me out drinks in San Antonio in a month

        • Re: My latest stump...
          Charles Culp

          Just looking at the .png, I will say it can't be done easily. Not with surfacing, at least. In theory you can create the pattern on something flat. Then you can use the deform tool to deform it to the shape you need.

           

          A better solution is to use the sheet metal tools and actually bend it to the shape you need.

           

          This is a problem, though, if you have curvature in two directions (aka, it is not a cylinder/cone/etc). So if it can't be done with sheet metal, it can't be done with SolidWorks (easily).

           

          The best solution is to just use a reference, and not actually create the pattern. You can use an image file as a texture for the solidmodel, and a hatch pattern for the drawing. Is this good enough, or do you need the actual geometry in the model? If you do need the geometry in the model, how is it going to be manufactured?

          • Re: My latest stump...
            Cory Derico

            As you have the shape could you use a mesh of lines and the split line tool to represent it?

             

            Depending on the pattern you could free draw, radial pattern or linear pattern the lines to represnt the designs.

              I did not have but a minute to play with it, but this is with a horizontal and vertical mesh and split line...

            • Re: My latest stump...
              Matthew Perez

              Looking at your file i see a few things i would probably avoid.

               

              First your part is symmetric.  It might be easier for you to model half of it then mirror.  Especially when we start dealing with the pattern.

               

              Sketch1 has sketch fillets in it.  Sketch2 is an ellipse so the transition between the two produces some unwanted geometry.  For a visual representation this probably isnt a problem but for a production part it certainly will be.  See the curvature image i uploaded.

               

               

              Curvature.jpg

               

               

              Your loft has a lot of 3d sketches used for guide rails.  I would avoid using 3d sketches whenever possible.

               

               

               

               

              Can you get rid of the fillet on the first sketch or is that a neccessary evil?

                • Re: My latest stump...
                  Rich Bolduc

                  Unfortunatly it's a neccesay evil... Our Product Managers were given a 2d drawing, showed a customer before I could even give inpuut on whats possible and already sold 25k of them...  And expect the item to look just like the 2D drawing they showed

                   

                   

                   

                  • Re: My latest stump...
                    Matthew Perez

                    Curvature4.jpgCurvature3.jpgThis is by no means the right or efficient way to do this but i was curious.  I split the body(part of it) and did some free form tweaks on individual sections.  I think the deform option or even a fill surface(after the split) with a constraint curve would work much better.  I also redid some of your guides.  Take a look at how i made Curve1 inside the boundary surface and how i modified sketch1 to get rid of the fillet.  Probably best to turn on the curvature combs to see the transitions.

                     

                    Curvature2.JPG

                  • Re: My latest stump...
                    Rich Bolduc

                    This is where it's sitting now