6 Replies Latest reply on Nov 22, 2010 9:57 AM by Ahmed ashal

    Q: Product design development ?

    Ahmed ashal

      hello everybody

      my name is Ahmed , and I'm a mechanical design engineer who is interested sometimes in product design.

      when i was young i was interested in drawing cars. then i learned 3DS MAX which is a very powerful poly modeling tool for artists and visualization.

      my love of designing cars increases, and i decide to learn some specialized tools for car designing ; so i came to use Aliasstudio,  in the same time i had to

      choose a package for mechanical design as it is my career.....

      i found that Solidworks is awesome package for mechanical design , but when we talk about product design , although the major enhancement of surface modeling tools in recent versions ,  i think there is some question and exclamation marks which i need to find answers for them ;

       

      first of all and the most important to me:

      • when SW user will find a G2,3,4 curves like these in alias instead of the weak spline tool which is very very easy to loose its continuity if u made small tweaks in 3D  ?
      • when will we see the lattice method for part modeling ? (for those who don't know)  it's a reshaping method where the program create a lattice of a specified shape     and number of vertices around the the part through which u can control the shape of the part after designing it.. also known as (total modeling).
      • when will we see some ART designing tools like picture imposing or deposing on a surface?

       

      isn't SW is only a CAD (also maybe CAE) package like Dassault  want ? why so Dassault don't improve these critical points in it !!!?

       

      please i need a real and direct answer to these questions specially the first one (when will we see the G2,3,4 curve in SW ?) is it possible or not ?

      as it will be a turn-point in my life.

      Thanks for your time, thanks for your reading , and thanks for your answers.

      Ahmed el_ash3al

      el_ash3al@yahoo.com

        • Re: Q: Product design development ?
          Scott McFadden

          Ahmed,

          I have no clue as to the answers to those questions, but here is a thread that works on the

          same type thing you are looking and wanting to do.  So maybe you will find a solution there.

           

           

          https://forum.solidworks.com/message/182218#182218

            • Re: Q: Product design development ?
              Ahmed ashal

              many thanks Scott McFadden

              i moved the topic from sketching section to surfacing section to be more effective.

              but i still don't know if Dassault will develop the G2,3,4 curves or it will be a matter of fancy!

              i also thanks Nurkholish who send me a link to a great and simple tool for creating G2 curves

              www.moi3d.com

              really cool and simple software.

              i hope we will see this kind of curves in SW shortly.

            • Re: Q: Product design development ?
              Kevin De Smet

              Solidworks offers a G2 sketch constraint and the surfacing tools practically all have a G2 boundary condition. The things that are harder to do in Solidworks in my opinion, is working low span and to higher continuity levels, but you must understand that the importance of both of these are... debated.

               

              What I mean by that is that it's very hard for most products to be able to tell the difference between G2 and higher levels of continuity and the usage of many spans is not really that problematic most of the time. Only becomes a problem when you want to do direct modeling, I don't even think CAM or Simulation programs have any beef with a surface that has 60 spans, as long as a software algorithm generated it to some set tolerance, it'll probably be smooth enough without much of any anomalies.

               

              So the real question is perhaps: should Solidworks include direct modeling? Well there's the Freeform tool already and it's a step in that direction but currently no it does not. Solidworks' foundation are the parametric modeling approach that is inherently different from direct modeling workflows. So desiring this might be unrealistic?

               

              Lattice is a good idea I think, maybe include that in the Freeform tool? But lattices on nurbs geometry (which Solidworks also uses) is very tricky and isn't so easy as a poly modeler including a lattice modifier. I know Alias has the transformer rig but I don't know the success rate of that tool at all.

               

              Displacement mapping sounds like a good idea too. Maybe maybe?

                • Re: Q: Product design development ?
                  Ahmed ashal

                  thanks Kevin De Smet

                  what i intended to say is why solidworks doesn't introduce a new curve sketch tool that basically support continuity in its real form like those in alias or rhino

                  or even moi ?

                  i know that SW support G2 continouty for surfaces  in all its tools , i didn't talk about that.

                  i wnat to talk about wireframe modeling, that u'll find the spline tool  is hard and not convince for the job.

                  i know that u can do some nice curves with this tool but it still isn't the optimum method of doing things.

                • Re: Q: Product design development ?
                  Roland Schwarz

                  Since you are so interested in product design, take a look at SW as a product itself.  It is a product driven by parameters determined by a marketing organisation.  Marketing has determined the price point and features they wish to sell to the CAD market.

                   

                  Yes, SW can be improved, but SW just hasn't decided to do it.  There are things UG and Pro/E have been doing for over ten years that SW hasn't even begun to catch up with.  They would be simple to implement but they simply have decided it is not important to them.