4 Replies Latest reply on Nov 22, 2010 7:15 PM by Kevin Bouwman

    A Little Movement is a Good Thing

    Charles Reicherrt

      Hello Everybody!

      I have a simple part sketch (attached screen shot). Notice the small rectangle at the 12:00 position is not centered on the center line.  I did at one point select "something" and could manually move it over...I cant remember how I did it.  I feel confident there are many ways to do this.  How can I get SW's to move it for me so it is perfectly centered horizontally, while remaining in the same vertical position; basically move the sketch over to the left half way.

      Thanks for everybody's time!

      Charles

        • Re: A Little Movement is a Good Thing
          Hubert Carle

          Your answer is a symmetric mate.

           

          First the setup:  You need a verticle center line.  Or if you are doing a horizontal symmetric then a horizontal center line. That is it.

           

          Ctrl click select both sides of the rectangle and the centerline. The symbol looks like a square with a diagnal line through it.  If it does not show up in the quick menu look on the choices on the left.   Sometimes it doesn't show up so you have to escape out and start over again.  That mate will keep the rectangle centered on the centerline no matter where you move it vertically.

              • Re: A Little Movement is a Good Thing
                Ryan Laplante

                Long version...

                Here is how I would do it, delete the verticle line you have coming from your center point to the corner of your rectangle, now measure from center point of circle to the upper horizontal line on your rectangle, that will keep it horizontally contrained.

                 

                Now using a construction geometry line - draw a line from the center of the circle to the mid point of your rectangle, select the construction geomtry line you just drew and constrain it to be verticle.  you might want to make the lower line tangent to the inner circle

                 

                short version - delete the verticle line you have from the center point, redraw it to the centerpoint of the lower horizontal line and make it verticle, futher constraints could be made by making the lower horizontal line angent to the inner diameter

            • Re: A Little Movement is a Good Thing
              Kevin Bouwman

              You could also right click on one of the horizontal lines of the rectangle, choose "Select Midpoint" from the context menu that pops up, Ctrl-Click on the center line, and select the coincident relation.   Or...you could Ctrl-Click on the center point of the circle instead of the center line and select the vertical relation.