4 Replies Latest reply on Aug 14, 2009 12:26 PM by 1-YJ1IM

    Some questions on meshing

    Derek Bishop

      Question1: My understanding is that a compatible mesh is one where the nodes of mating faces or edges of adjacent bodies are aligned. Please confirm this is correct.


      Question2: My understanding is that bonding is never a problem where a compatible mesh exists. Please confirm this is correct.

       

      Question 3: My understanding is bonding may or may not be a problem with an incompatible mesh. Please confirm this is correct.

       

      Question 4: Please clarify the purpose of the 'remeshed failed parts with incompatible mesh' option. What does this do? I have found that a study will mesh and run without problem on occasions with this option unticked even though the mesh between adjacent faces is not compatible.

        • Re: Some questions on meshing
          Derek Bishop

          Don't tell me I'm the only sucker still using Simulation. Any one else out there using the software with some answers.

          • Re: Some questions on meshing

            Question1: My understanding is that a compatible mesh is one where the nodes of mating faces or edges of adjacent bodies are aligned. Please confirm this is correct.

             

            This is correct. For the mating face or edge of body there will be a node at the same location in model space as a node for mating face or edge of the other body. Note for this to happen, the mating faces or edges have to touch each other.

             

            Question2: My understanding is that bonding is never a problem where a compatible mesh exists. Please confirm this is correct.

             

            Stress results can be wrong in the bonded area if you are bonding bodies with dissimilar materials. There is an option for stress output to overcome this issue.In the defination of the stress plot, under the "Advanced Options", uncheck "Average results across boundary for parts".

             

            Question 3: My understanding is bonding may or may not be a problem with an incompatible mesh. Please confirm this is correct.


            Stress results at the bonded interface can be wrong if the size of mesh is different between the two bodies. There is a setting that will solve this issue. On the properties of the study, on the "Options" tab, check "Improve accuracy for contacting surfaces with incompatible mesh (slower)".

             

             

            Question 4: Please clarify the purpose of the 'remeshed failed parts with incompatible mesh' option. What does this do? I have found that a study will mesh and run without problem on occasions with this option unticked even though the mesh between adjacent faces is not compatible.

             

            If you have two faces touching each other that are different is size, for it to create a compatible mesh, it has to create split lines so that there is a common area to map nodes on top of nodes. This can sometimes cause meshing problems due to split lines creating "sliver" faces. Incompatible mesh does not map nodes on top of nodes, so it does not have to create these split lines.

              • Re: Some questions on meshing
                Derek Bishop
                Great stuff Wayne. Thanks for your assistance. Can I ask your sources of information. I checked my training manual and Simulation help for information of the topic and could not come up with much. Maybe I just didn't look in the right places.
                  • Re: Some questions on meshing

                    All of these questions are covered in the 2009 SolidWorks Simulation manual. I do not remember for sure about 2008 and before.

                     

                    Compatible/Incompatiible Mesh is covered in Lesson 6. Lesson10, Thermal Stress Analysis of Bimetallic Strip, covers the stress averaging issue.

                     

                    If you have taken a previous class, I suggest that you get with your VAR to see if they will sell you a 2009 Simulation manual without a class.