11 Replies Latest reply on Sep 4, 2009 6:39 PM by David Paulson

    Cyclone separator

      Hello everybody,

      i wanted to know if solidworks flow simulation is capable of simulating cyclone separators,  i'm looking for a way to simulate a cyclone process to classify mineral powders according to density.

       

      Thank You.

        • Re: Cyclone separator
          Joe Galliera
          Yes, you can do a cyclone separator in Flow Simulation.  Run to get the flow field results, and then in a post-processing step, setup and run the Particle Trajectories.  There is information about how to do this in the Help, Tutorials and Training.
          • Re: Cyclone separator
            Charles Culp
            Cyclone Seperator? I belive that is the Nebraska offensive line.
            • Re: Cyclone separator

              Thnaks Joe. i will give solidworks flow simulation a try.

              i found out that wide angle or 'water only' cyclones are used to sort particles according to density. does anyone know any design guidelines for this type of cyclones?

              Thanks.

              • Re: Cyclone separator

                Another question,

                does flow simulation support RSM; Reynolds Stress Model (turbulance model) ?

                i've seen papers which prove, RSM is the most appropriate model for this type of problem.

                 

                Thank you.

                • Re: Cyclone separator
                  Stefan Wozniak
                  I'v spoken to Flow support and this is not the best tool for cyclone separators. You need to run study on higest resolution level and you still could have a problem with particle study.
                    • Re: Cyclone separator
                      Joe Galliera

                      We have a customer in Italy, Modutech, who does cyclone separators and Alessandro wrote to me after I inquired about his experience.  He says, "in my opinion the K-e model works perfectly and the behavior in Cyclone I sent you last  year is very accurate."

                       

                      You can see some pictures of his results at the following link: Modutech

                       


                    • Re: Cyclone separator
                      David Paulson

                      I have used Flow Simulation 2009 to evaluate the flow in a helical (very similar to a cyclone) separator that separates oil from refrigerant vapor in a refrigeration system.  With the understanding that Flow does not compute flow patterns of two phase substances, I used a particle study to understand the separation of the oil from the refrigerant vapor.  The results are credible, but I do not have the capability to validate that claim because field temperature measurements of the vessel wall are the most readilly available parameter to validate the study.  Unfortunately, Flow does not compute the thermal transfer properties of the particles.  If Flow were able to further compute the thermal effect of the injected particles it would be much more useful as a design tool that can help interpret results of actual simulations.  The thermal effects of particles provide the most useful method of measuring the efficiency of this kind of separator in an actual field test.

                       

                      Flow needs to provide the capability of calculating the thermal effect of particles as a third stage computation so that evaluation can be made of actual field tests of this type of separator, as well as many other types of devices.  And this also suggests that Flow should be able to be "calibrated" to make the computer model match the test model.  This way the results of design changes to the separator can more accurately be predicted.

                       

                      While the flow patterns predicted by Flow are believable, the particle behavior is believable, the program does not provide the utility to validate field  measured results.  I think this essential to consider Flow a true design tool.

                        • Re: Cyclone separator
                          Joe Galliera
                          You can define a temperature for the particles different from the fluid in the calculation.  Then by showing the temperature change of the particles, could you not compute the thermal transfer properties of the particles?
                            • Re: Cyclone separator
                              David Paulson
                              I did define the temperature of the particles.  But they are the same as the temperature of the fluid, approximately 205 degrees F.entering the separator.  What I am trying to determine is if the refrigerant gas entering the actual, not the model, separator is two phase flow.  The shell of the separator looses heat to an ambient airstream.  If the Flow Simulation prediction of the temperature gradients on the shell is consistent with actual measured results, then we can deduce that the refrigerant flow is only gas and the temperature gradient is due solely to ambient air.  But the temperature impact of the particle flow, which is not unsubstantial on a mass flow basis, is not reflected in the temperature gradient of the shell.  And to do that, the temperature effect of the particles needs to be added to the analysis.