21 Replies Latest reply on Jan 9, 2019 10:21 AM by Kyle Fredericks

    how can you place inserted components at origin

    Kyle Fredericks

      Hello,

       

      Every time i model a complex assembly with all unique parts i do it from one part and when it's finished i split the part into bodies and import into a new assembly.
      I'm curious if there's a way to speed up the process of snapping to origin, instead of right clicking each front face and the origin front face and making coincident and then the right faces and then the top faces etc for every part.   it adds 20 minutes just for mating all these parts and is crazy tedious.

       

      Is there a way of inserting a part into assembly and snapping to origin? mating all top planes to top planes and front to front and right to right etc..

       

      trying to avoid all the tedious things in solidworks.

       

      Thanks!

        • Re: how can you place inserted components at origin
          Richard Bremmer

          Place/click on the (visible/shown) origin, or use insert components and immediately press the green checkmark (don't click in the document window).

          • Re: how can you place inserted components at origin
            Britt Kessler

            Yes, you can just hit the green check mark and it will insert the part at the origin of the new assembly, but it does so as a fixed part with (f) next to your part in the assembly part tree. Unfortunately, this does not mate the part to the Front, Top, Right planes. It just fixes in place, and if some ding-dong comes along later and removes the fixed status of the part by right clicking and selecting "Float", that unlocks your base part in the assembly and everything can move freely out of position.

             

            Since I've been on this forum, I have always read that best practice is to mate your first part in the assembly to the Front, Top, Right planes, thus insuring that your base part is fixed, and cannot be moved from its set position.

              • Re: how can you place inserted components at origin
                Brian Brazeau

                You can also just drag and drop parts on the feature tree itself as opposed to the graphics window then "Fix" part(s)(You can Shift select them all at once and apply the fixed constraint), but as Britt said your open to ding-dongs. Fortunately, I've been lucky enough not to have to collaborate with ding-dongs too much.

                • Re: how can you place inserted components at origin
                  Jim Sculley

                  Britt Kessler wrote:

                   

                  Since I've been on this forum, I have always read that best practice is to mate your first part in the assembly to the Front, Top, Right planes, thus insuring that your base part is fixed, and cannot be moved from its set position.

                  I fail to see how this is any more 'fixed' than making it, well, fixed.  I can delete mates just as easily (more easily actually) than I can change a part from Fixed to Floating.  Replacing 3 mates with zero mates is an improvement.

                    • Re: how can you place inserted components at origin
                      Dan Pihlaja

                      Jim Sculley wrote:

                       

                      Britt Kessler wrote:

                       

                      Since I've been on this forum, I have always read that best practice is to mate your first part in the assembly to the Front, Top, Right planes, thus insuring that your base part is fixed, and cannot be moved from its set position.

                      I fail to see how this is any more 'fixed' than making it, well, fixed. I can delete mates just as easily (more easily actually) than I can change a part from Fixed to Floating. Replacing 3 mates with zero mates is an improvement.

                      Plus, on top of that......a fix mate never "flips".  Not saying that coincident mates flip all the time....just saying that it is "more possible" (possibler?) to flip than a fix mate would be.

                    • Re: how can you place inserted components at origin
                      Kyle Fredericks

                      does mating origins to workarea origin prevent flipping ? if something were to suppress that origin mate and it were to symmetrically flipped somehow due to a overconfident conflicting mate and then the origin mate unsuppressed could it still satisfy that original mate?

                    • Re: how can you place inserted components at origin
                      John Stoltzfus

                      Kyle Fredericks

                       

                      Below is a small sub-assembly - everything is fixed but a few parts 007 & 009 are another instance of a previous part and 42748 is a fluted pin, which 3 are mated and the others are mirrored... .

                       

                      The other parts are dropped onto the Origin in the Assembly.  This allows for the assembly components to move with the design parametrically.  If you model the parts separately and then drop them into the sub-assembly, mate it and then delete those mates, what's gonna happen when things need to change, not a big deal if you're dealing with small assemblies, but still a huge waste of time and resources. 

                       

                      • Re: how can you place inserted components at origin
                        Matt Lombard

                        Kyle,

                        It sounds like you're building all parts as a single multibody part. If you are doing that, let me tell you why I think this is a bad idea. And then I'll tell you how to do what you are asking very easily. You think you're saving time by doing this all in one, and you might as long as you do everything perfect, and don't deviate from a really basic way of working. If you have to make changes, you might find that you wish you had done things differently.

                         

                        1) if you ever have to trouble shoot features, you've got all of your features in a single part. Good luck. What a night mare (rebuild times - long history trees, possibly jumbled features)

                        2) if you want to reuse or make copies of parts, you've got a mess

                        3) drawings with part dimensions? good luck.

                        4) file size

                        5) single very corruptible part

                        6) unless you're very careful, your features for each body/part are going to get jumbled.

                        7) if you make the mistake of making a single feature effect multiple bodies, and want to delete one of them, you've got an awful mess

                        8) dividing all the bodies into individual parts with features is tough

                         

                        But, for some type of work, what you are doing is actually the way to go, so there is an easy way to take the multibody part, use Insert=>Features=>Save Bodies (or Split), and you can save the bodies to parts, then bring the parts back together as an assembly using the common origin from the part. It all works from the Save Bodies PropertyManager. Save Bodies is actually half of the Split PropertyManager, if you have to split any bodies in the course of making your assembly.