20 Replies Latest reply on Dec 20, 2018 12:49 PM by Rebecca Bennett

    Internal Ids

    John Frahm

      How do I fix this?

      We have commonly used parts that are stored at a network location. I can insert the component from the network location. Everything appears fine. I use it throught my assembly. Save and close the assembly. Reopen the assembly I I get the above. It is suppressed in the feature tree. When I try to unsuppress, I get the same response.

       

      Thanks in advance!

       

      Jack

        • Re: Internal Ids
          John Frahm

          My work around was to create a new file by save as copy and open>390-10926-0002_grainger. I would like to know what caused the error in the first place to keep this from happening. PDM tool is the correct way to go, but management will not go that route quite yet. 3 users sharing data.

           

          Any shorter term solutions?

          • Re: Internal Ids
            Glenn Schroeder

            I occasionally get the same message, but I also get a dialog box asking if I want SW to use the file anyway.  Check your dismissed messages to see if you've turned that off (Tools > Options > System Options > Messages/Errors/Warnings).

            • Re: Internal Ids
              Rubén Rodolfo Balderrama

              All people using the network has mapped the Z: unit? or has different letters ones?

              • Re: Internal Ids
                Ian McLean

                Avoid having multiple files with the same names. It's a really bad idea. In this case the files were not created from the same part so have different IDs. If they were created from the same part Solidworks wouldn't even warn you.

                  • Re: Internal Ids
                    John Frahm

                    Ian,

                    Do not understand. The file is named 690-10926-0002.sldprt located in a file directory on the server. I insert that file from its location to my assembly which is located elsewhere on the server. I am not trying to having two different files named the same thing in tow different places. I am trying to reference the one file from different machines.

                     

                    We do not have a vault so we do not check files in and out like you do in PDM. We are trying to gather together a group of commonly used standard parts in one network location instead of every user having their own files on their own machine. Working towards being collaborative on projects instead of stand alone machines.

                  • Re: Internal Ids
                    Roland Schwarz

                    WAn old blog post about internal ID. It’s geared toward API but it should be helpful.

                    Tick Talk on EsoxRepublic.com » Internal ID

                     

                    Internal ID remains fixed through all save-as, pack-and-go, and operating system copy operations. If a file has a different internal ID it’s because someone created a new file from scratch.

                     

                    if two files are imported from the same source, e.g. Grainger, the likely will appear identical but they are not.

                    • Re: Internal Ids
                      Christian Chu

                      My guess is  a user might open assembly and somehow the assembly includes  a part from local drive which is the same name with the one from the server

                      when you open the assembly, it couldn't find the part from user local drive so you got that error message

                      I'm not sure if someone here has better solution but I solved it by changing the ref. when open the assembly

                      • Re: Internal Ids
                        Rebecca Bennett

                        Having this issue, but our suspicions for the problem are currently directed toward the Century Link tech that disconnected our server without notice while we were all working.  Everything is fine except one lowly flat washer that was modified just before the take-down.

                        The other offices can open files that refer to it just fine, no errors, but we get the error that this flat washer has different internal ID.

                         

                        I've tried reattaching the reference (which is just to the same file path), 'use this file anyway' (still made), having it open while I open my assembly, and replacing the part (which loses all mates in a massively used configured assembly of all diameter sizes).

                         

                        So, if the other offices can open it just fine, what happened to our office?  Why can't we read a file that everyone else can?

                          • Re: Internal Ids
                            David Nelson

                            We sometimes have that and when it does happen we have to delete the part and put it right back in.  Which solves the problem.  We use the same type of file system you use a server to host all the parts.  Each type in a different folder.  Takes a bit to get used to but now it is very easy to use.

                             

                              We had folks for a while hosting a part on their drive not the server and that can cause all sorts of problems.

                              • Re: Internal Ids
                                Rebecca Bennett

                                Thank you, David,

                                Would we want to Pack and Go, Save As, or just copy that part somewhere else?

                                  • Re: Internal Ids
                                    David Nelson

                                    Rebecca Bennett wrote:

                                     

                                    Thank you, David,

                                    Would we want to Pack and Go, Save As, or just copy that part somewhere else?

                                    I would delete the part in the assemble and then just insert the part that is now in the file that says it has a wrong ID.   I would not move the part anywhere. But make sure to talk to all your folks about file handling and replacing parts, what can happen.  That way you do not have to go thru this again.

                                • Re: Internal Ids
                                  Rebecca Bennett

                                  Apparently, many of the configurations where gone and the user just reloaded the design table.

                                  Would that have caused this?

                                • Re: Internal Ids
                                  Frederick Law

                                  Wrong Internal ID usually means someone replaced the file with another.

                                  For example, one download STEP file from supplier, convert to SW.  Save it in assembly.

                                  Another did the same thing.  Save it to server replacing the 'old' file.

                                  First one open assembly, Wrong Internal ID but part is the same.