8 Replies Latest reply on Nov 4, 2018 12:20 PM by Deepak Gupta

    Figuring out different ortho views - P4-101

    John Pena

      Recently given an assignment in which we were given two different ortho views (assuming third angle projection) but we were not told which view (front, top, right) it was nor were we given a 3D reference model. We were told to draw the two views that were given in addition to the one that was not. Lastly, we were instructed to prepare a three-dimensional sketch of the object. However, I'm having trouble figuring out which ortho view I am looking at. He just introduced ortho views this week and it can be a mind-f*ck even when you have all three traditional views in front of you along with the 3D reference model. Could you offer help or hints in reference to my thoughts down below. I'll be making a different post for each of the four ortho pairings so as to not bog down anyone with a really long post.

       

      Figure P4-101

       

      Leftmost Ortho View

       

      My initial thoughts of the leftmost ortho view was that it was the front especially since its bottom seems to aligned with the bottom of the right most ortho view. Additionally, the chapter did emphasize placement of ortho views and i had a hard time imagining the left most ortho view as the right-sided or top-sided ortho view.

       

      Rightmost Ortho View

       

      Believed it's the right ortho view based on its placement in relation to the other ortho view but also because the line that corresponds with the .75 dimensional height seems to align with the hidden feature line on the leftmost ortho view. Also, the fact that the width of the two different views shown don't align leads me to believe that neither of them is the top view.

       

      Edited for missing words/readability

       

        • Re: Figuring out different ortho views - P4-101
          Richard Ahlgrim

          Hello John,

          I would say your assumptions are correct.

          Once you have something drawn up, post an image here if you have more questions.

          • Re: Figuring out different ortho views - P4-101
            Kevin Chandler

            Hello,

             

            To help practice your views, grab a familiar, but small, object you have at hand, like a pencil.

            Take a moment to rotate it about in your hand and really examine it.

            Then pick an orientation and rough draw that view on a piece of paper. An outline with enough detail to distinguish the view is okay.

            With that view established, pick the next view (say it aloud) and then orient the object in your hand to that stated view.

            Draw this stated view on the paper in the correct relation to the first view. Just as it should be if this were on CAD.

             

            Mutter loud the view names as you go to help the lesson sink in.

             

            Grab other object and repeat this. Keep going. It's a matter of practice.

             

            This is what the "Ancients", such as myself, did "back in the day".

             

            When I started my machinist apprenticeship, for the print reading/drafting class, each person was given a Lucite rectangular block that had a slot, a through hole, a countersink and a counterbore. Being clear, you could readily see hidden edges, etc. as you held it in hand.

            I don't have it anymore, though I wish I did.

             

            Find (or make) yourself an object like this on which you can mark the view names and whatever else helps you learn the concepts.

             

            I thinks it helps to hold something tangible (in this intangible world).

             

            Be patient. But persistent.

             

            Good luck,

             

            Kevin

            • Re: Figuring out different ortho views - P4-101
              Melissa Newby

              Also, to go along with what Kevin said - Think about placing that object at the bottom of a bowl. Whatever side is facing up is your front view. Slide the object up the right side of the bowl (until it is 90° off), that is your right view. Slide it up the back of the bowl, that is your top view. Same with the bottom and left sides of the bowl. Having a tangible item in your hand helps as you picture sliding it up the sides of the bowl.

               

              Does that help with understanding ortho views?

              • Re: Figuring out different ortho views - P4-101
                Solid Air

                John,

                 

                What you are going to find is there are different opinions; and mine no different.  There are six "standard" views: front, back, top, bottom, left and right.  An object can be orientated so that one time you are looking at the front view, the next it may be the top view.  So what am I getting at: assume one view to be the front view and go from there; do not get hung up on view names (it's just not that important unless your instructor is ____ about those kind of things).

                 

                If your having trouble envisioning what a front, right, etc. view is.  Stand in front of a house, assume this is front view.  Move to your right and look at the right side of the house, this is right view.  Back in front of the house, move to left and look at left side of the house, this is left view.  You should be able to figure out the rest yourself.

                 

                Now I could complicate things by telling you this is what is called third angle projection.  The views could also be first angle projection which means the view names would be reversed for left and right, top and bottom.  However looking at you png, they look like third angle projections to me.

                 

                In order to make your third view, pay particular attention to the hidden lines.  Having grown up in a 2D world (25 years of designing in 2D), your assignment looks pretty simple to me but I can relate to your dilemma.  Our parent company has bought several businesses and we are often required to decipher their old 2D drawings (thing about the 2D world it was very easy to omit geometry especially when it would have required descriptive geometry to draw correctly).  It can be very difficult to figure out what is being depicted when you are not familiar with the equipment.

                 

                Hope this helps...

                • Re: Figuring out different ortho views - P4-101
                  J. Mather

                  John Pena wrote:

                   

                  1. ...but we were not told which view (front, top, right) 

                  2. ...I'm having trouble figuring out which ortho view I am looking at.

                  3. ... Could you offer help or hints in reference to my thoughts down below.

                   

                  1. Doesn't matter - all relative.

                  2. Doesn't matter - all relative.

                  3. Model one of the views as boundary of what is there (Extrude or Revolve).  Switch around to another given view and cut away what isn't there (just like out on the shop floor or on the beach in the sand next to the water (but not too close)).

                  • Re: Figuring out different ortho views - P4-101
                    Solid Air

                    Back in the old days when all we had was a drafting board, T-Square, 30-60 & 45 triangles, tracing paper and masking tape we were taught how to make the third view by drawing a 45 degree line above one of the views (red line), then project lines up to it (green) and then project lines, using the intersection point, over above the other view (blue horz lines).  You then project lines up from the other view (blue vert lines).  Now connect the intersections.  I suppose it's not taught this way today?

                     

                      • Re: Figuring out different ortho views - P4-101
                        Deepak Gupta

                        Solid Air wrote:

                         

                        Back in the old days when all we had was a drafting board, T-Square, 30-60 & 45 triangles, tracing paper and masking tape we were taught how to make the third view by drawing a 45 degree line above one of the views (red line), then project lines up to it (green) and then project lines, using the intersection point, over above the other view (blue horz lines). You then project lines up from the other view (blue vert lines). Now connect the intersections. I suppose it's not taught this way today?

                        I have been taught same way around 22 years back