11 Replies Latest reply on Oct 10, 2018 6:46 PM by Jennifer Bahnsen

    Can I use a workflow to assign a datacard?

    Tom Strohscher

      I would like to store specifics about parts and make data cards specific to the type pf part it is.

      For example:

      If the part type is "shaft" I want a data card to show diameter and length.

      If the part type is bearing I want the data card to show ID and OD.

       

      If the parts are checked into the same folder and the file extensions are both .sldprt, how can I get PDM to look at the part type property in the file and map and display the correct properties?

        • Re: Can I use a workflow to assign a datacard?
          Nadia Shea

          I wouldn't try to do this with a workflow, I would do this with 'Control Logic' on a PDM Datacard.

          2018 SOLIDWORKS PDM Help - Adding Control Logic to a Control

           

          The most common example of this that I've implemented is :

          Part Type: Can be Purchased or Manufactured

          Variables such as Vendor Or Cost will not "show" unless the Part Type is set to purchased.

          Type= blank or Built

          Type = purchased

           

          This concept could easily be transferred over to your specific scenario.

            • Re: Can I use a workflow to assign a datacard?
              Tom Strohscher

              This crossed my mind but didn't know how complex it would get with a dozen part types.

                • Re: Can I use a workflow to assign a datacard?
                  Nadia Shea

                  It could get fairly complex but not un-doable.

                   

                  The other options is simply list all the dims for all part file types in a seperate tab (or hide them all together) and just forget control logic.

                  You can put frames around the dim to identify 'part types' but that could get really messy if there are a lot of shared ones.

                   

                  If the idea is get that data searchable, this accomplishes it. I only suggest hiding them or putting them on a separate tab on the data card for a couple of reasons. First, users don't need to see all this complicated data each time they touch a file and secondly, you won't be forced to pre-sort the part types files into separate folders.

                   

                  It's not the most elegant way of doing things but it gets the job done. The fun bit is now that you have all that data captured.. it can be easily found and if you WANT to sort those file, it'll be a piece of cake in PDM, what with moving files and not breaking references and such..

              • Re: Can I use a workflow to assign a datacard?
                Joy Garon

                Well, I would suggest the simplest first:

                Create a folder for Shafts and save a shafts specific datacard within the folder.

                Create a folder for Bearings and save a bearing specific datacard within the folder.

                 

                However, I have a few questions: what is the purpose for this? is it for searching? where is this information currently stored?

                Sometimes, a well defined part naming specification can solve the issue:

                SHAFT, DIAMETER, LENGTH

                I don't think you want to get to the point where you end up with a coding and classification system :-)

                  • Re: Can I use a workflow to assign a datacard?
                    Tom Strohscher

                    Folders is out of the question unless we can automate it.  We have a set parts that make up mold components for a product.  I thinking we would have a folder for the product.  Then to make a dozen folders to put one of each individual part in seems crazy.

                     

                    I also thought dispatch might help but didn't see any commands to define data cards.

                     

                    I need to use folders to organize our products and folders to define security, and now to define the variables assigned to a part.

                    I'm struggling with how to organize my data and how to use this tool as each step seems to be a challenge.

                    I havent even got to what the users have to do to get the files in the right place.

                     

                    Most all of our parts come from template files.  The template has a custom property that defines what the part is.  The dimensions in the parts are assigned to file custom properties.  If we can move the dimension properties to a data card and database we can search for parts based on dimension values.  This allows us to reuse similar parts.  It all fails if the user ends up putting the file in the wrong folder.

                     

                    I believe our file naming convention could work in some cases but I thought data cards were defined by the file extension.  I'll have to experiment with this.

                     

                    Thanks

                  • Re: Can I use a workflow to assign a datacard?
                    Michael Dekoning

                    Tom,

                    Another option could be to use a Tab control and let it be driven by a variable value. Add a droplist control with an entry for each part type. Add a Tab control to a card and create a tab for each part type. Select Controlled by variable in the Properties and select the variable associated with the droplist (Type in the example below). Only the controls on the tab named after the value in the droplist will appear to the user.

                    • Re: Can I use a workflow to assign a datacard?
                      Tim Webb

                      Tom,

                       

                      Just got on this morning and saw this. We just did this for a customer using a Tab control as Michael Dekoning recommended. It's a great alternative to multiple data cards, multiple folders, no automation, etc.

                       

                      HTH,

                      Tim

                      Believe in The Q!