22 Replies Latest reply on Sep 20, 2018 3:21 PM by Michael Ball

    Graphics Card

    Russell Waseem

      Hey can you guys give me some suggestions on a decent graphics card for dell tower 3620? Using RX, I was able to find drivers for Win10 SW 2017.  Anyone know which is decent for my Dell 3620 Tower?

       

        • Re: Graphics Card
          Paul Salvador

          ..imho, price/performance = "P4000"

          • Re: Graphics Card
            Jeff Mowry

            I've got an AMD FirePro W5100 and it's flawless.  Got that at $300 or so after frying an expensive Quadro card playing a game.  Actually prefer this AMD a LOT more than the Quadro.  But most of my assemblies are more complex geometry than millions of parts.

              • Re: Graphics Card
                Nadia Shea

                Offhand question.. I have noticed with the Dell/AMD cards that users HAVE to use the Dell micro adapted or HDMI to fully leverage the AMD cards. If they just used USB, applications would not use the AMD card but revert back to the Intel motherboard graphics. I was curious if this was your experience as well.

                  • Re: Graphics Card
                    Jeff Mowry

                    Not sure whether that was really intended for me?  My usage is in a desktop machine (and not a laptop), and therefore the AMD FirePro W5100 card I use is full-size (I use two Display Ports for my monitors).

                     

                    Some motherboards do indeed have onboard graphics chips, and therefore graphics ports directly from the motherboard.  So you can plug into either to obtain signal from either.  I don't know, however, whether you can obtain different signals from each graphics option concurrently---never tried that.

                • Re: Graphics Card
                  Maha Nadarasa

                  I have been using AMD FirePro W4100 2GB (CAD 239.99) for almost a year with no complaint. Because I am not prepared to pay $$ for popular brand names. 

                  • Re: Graphics Card
                    Noah Jackowitz

                    I have a GTX 1080. Supposedly that's a bad choice, but it works fine for me. I think it's just untested by the official SW team, so there's no benchmark, so nobody dares use it, so they don't bother testing it, etc.

                     

                    It's also phenomenal for gaming, just make sure your boss isn't looking over your shoulder

                    • Re: Graphics Card
                      Dan Pihlaja

                      Depends on what you are doing.  For mid-range, I would say that the NVIDIA P2000 is a good card for the money.  But for higher end, Paul Salvador's P4000 is the way to go.

                      • Re: Graphics Card
                        Maha Nadarasa

                        Problem with expensive GC is, if you change the computer it will go with the computer unless you are ready to pay for another new expensive GC. Because it is suggested that once in a every 3 years you should change your computer because it will become slow after 3 years of use, my experience as well.

                        • Re: Graphics Card
                          Russell Waseem

                          Thanks guys, these are great suggestions!

                          • Re: Graphics Card
                            Keaton Warn

                            I'm using a P2000 off-site with no issues. Previously, I was using a K2200 and didn't have any memorable issues. I have had several problems with the AMD Pro WX 4100 this summer, but that might be specific to the Dell 5820 tower I am currently using at work.

                              • Re: Graphics Card
                                Russell Waseem

                                Ok I see why you made the change from K2200 to P2000. Initially I was going to go with the K2200 but after some research, I found out that the price difference isn't much for what the P2000 is offering compared to the K2200. I'm going with P2000 because price is reasonable for what you're getting. I just hope that my Dell 3620 will be able run fine with the P2000.

                              • Re: Graphics Card
                                Michael Ball

                                I'm using mostly GTX 1050ti 4Gig cards now. We've used p4000, k2200, and a few other 'recommended' graphics cards. They seem to die rather quickly (sometimes less than a year). I've experimented with all major brands (gigabyte, MSI, ASUS, etc). The Gigabyte seem to be working best with 3D stuff. I don't have a good reason to upgrade to 1080s because it's getting the job done with significantly lower cost even with our more complicated assemblies. I did have to modify windows registry to avoid the warnings for system resources low but that was easy. Total cost for our complete PC builds with windows 10 pro installed is less than $1500. All of these machines are built using AMD 2700x processors with 500G SSD. They run circles around the Dell built PC's that cost twice as much. I'm considering 10G ethernet now or bridging connections because with using the vault, our bottleneck is our NICs. I think it will be some time before it becomes a real issue however.

                                  • Re: Graphics Card
                                    Nadia Shea

                                    I've done presentations on hardware for SOLIDWORKS World. Once a nVidia representative reached out to me to give me some added information.

                                     

                                    The 'gaming' cards have a 1 year manufacturer warranty and multiple manufacturing facilities.

                                    The 'workstation class' cards have a 3 year manufacturer warranty and one manufacturing facility.

                                     

                                    I think what I'm getting at is... I'm sorry you've not had great luck with those cards, but when they died within a year, did you return them to NVidia? They should replace them.

                                    NVIDIA's Manufacturer's Warranty|NVIDIA

                                      • Re: Graphics Card
                                        Michael Ball

                                        Chevy trucks are manufactured in more than one place (three different countries actually). Are you suggesting that they are not as good as their competitors?

                                         

                                        No, those cards came already installed in our Dell computers. Those only came with a 1 year warranty. We've had horrible experience with Dell's customer service. You have to spend hours on the phone only to send the machine in for repair. We cannot have that kind of down time.The oldest card I've installed is well over a year old and is a quarter of the price of the Quadro cards. I can get a new one from Amazon next day or I can go to local computer store to get a replacement if absolutely necessary. But either way, for the price and downtime, even if I lost a card every two years (which I doubt will happen) it's still cheaper than the Quadro cards. I think it's an issue with the air flow on the quadro cards. They have a tiny 55mm fan on most of them and completely enclosed housing. The 1050ti's mostly have copper piped cooling, much bigger fans, and less enclosed than the quadro. Most of them do not require much more power than the Quadro and most of the time less power. I can't be certain about the manufacturing facilities nor am I concerned about it. I feel like if NVIDIA felt that strongly about the gaming cards, they shouldn't have put their name on the cards I'm buying. I feel the same way about Dell computers. Dell will say that they have 'tested' their machines for compatibility etc... The way new gaming PCs are manufactured, most components (except the graphics card), come with 3 and 5 year warranties out of the box. Dell charges a lot for the extended warranty and you still have to deal with their customer service. With the PCs I build, I can have parts in two days with free shipping through Amazon Prime. Plus if you use the same processor socket, all of the parts are interchangeable. It just makes so much sense than paying four times that for a machine that's not even as capable as the machines I'm building.

                                          • Re: Graphics Card
                                            Jeff Mowry

                                            It's exactly for the reasons you cited above that I began to learn more and more about how to build and maintain my own workstations---I cannot possibly afford the down-time and foot-dragging that inevitably become part of "service" or "warranty" processes.  I've got alternative (older) hard drives, graphics cards, monitors, etc. on hand in case something melts down, which will give me time to jump online hand have new parts delivered in a couple of days (I'm about two hours' drive from the nearest good-sized city, which makes hunting for specialized parts "in the now" quite difficult).

                                             

                                            Through this process, I've also found that what is often touted as the best/finest is often drifting on the fumes of reputation more than present performance.  Expensive Quadro cards are one example (as I've mentioned before).  I always dig up online reviews for specific components before placing them into any of my builds---simply because I've found reputation-based recommendations to be typically out of date, expensive, and generally disappointing.

                                             

                                            Many people absolutely need the mobility of a laptop-based workstation.  But for those who really don't have to use a laptop, my experience has been about 400% value of price/performance for the equivalent in desktop workstations.  Plus, you can use multiple large monitors (and other peripherals) which simply enhances your performance ratio.  And if you do a lot of renderings, you can also use the thing as an auxiliary space heater.

                                              • Re: Graphics Card
                                                Michael Ball

                                                Agreed Jeff. I have about 200 PCs. A small percentage of them are laptops and until they come out with form factor standards, I'm stuck with whatever is on the market. I will tell you I've had great luck with Razor laptops for Solidworks. I've been phasing out the Dells for a couple years now and my boss couldn't be happier. We've had less downtime, less initial cost, and better performing machines (not to mention better looking aesthetically).

                                                • Re: Graphics Card
                                                  Michael Ball

                                                  And you're spot on with the 400%. That's literally the exact same figure we came up with.

                                          • Re: Graphics Card
                                            Dan Pihlaja

                                            This is the one that I use.

                                             

                                            Although, I will say that the 377.11 driver has given me nothing but problems.   On the recommendation of one of the Solidworks Graphics guru's I am using the latest driver (391.25), and I switched my 3D Global Preset to "Workstation App - Dynamic Streaming" and I haven't had any issues so far (about a week now since I made the switch), and no crashes at all (fingers crossed).

                                             

                                             

                                            Except for that one thing, it has worked great!  Before the switch, I was having at least one crash a day.