2 Replies Latest reply on Aug 10, 2018 4:58 PM by Rick Becker

    what the best way to do a good Drawing 2d?, so that someone else can model it

    Victor Orrego

      Hi I'm from Colombia I apologize for my bad English

      I would like to ask for some help, about how to generate a good drawing 2d for such forms , that they are more complicated

      and that someone can do it again with good precision.

       

      What is the best way to generate 2d drawings, so that someone can read and can make a good replica of this piece?

      Sin título.png

       

       

      tapa.JPG

      I thank them very much for this great space to learn from the best.

        • Re: what the best way to do a good Drawing 2d?, so that someone else can model it
          Alex Burnett

          In my opinion, it is very difficult to dimension a contoured part like this once it gets past a certain degree of complexity. I would recommend starting with views/cross-sections that actually mimic how it was drawn it CAD.

           

          For example, if the long sections are a sweep then you could do a cross section of one of them and dimension the swept profile. (I haven't had time to open it and look at how it's been created.)

           

          However, if you've gotten into lofts or boundary features then it gets more difficult to dimension on a 2D print. And then, if you've added draft to some sections then you're in for a LOT of section views or notes calling out draft and direction.

           

          In these more difficult situations, we have a note we add to the print stating that the 3D solid data is to be used to create the tool for the part and the drawing will call out inspection dimensions and other critical data like texture and material. I know this doesn't really apply to your question but I thought it may help to see how the industry handles complex parts.

          • Re: what the best way to do a good Drawing 2d?, so that someone else can model it
            Rick Becker

            Victor Orrego wrote:

            ...What is the best way to generate 2d drawings, so that someone can read and can make a good replica of this piece?

             

            Luckily in the modern world it isn't really necessary. Give your solid/surface model (the one you are making the 2D print from) to whoever needs it. Send an exported STEP, Parasolid, IGS or other format.

             

            But to answer your question do a Google image search on airfoil or wing blueprint.

            The world was making very complex airfoils long before 3D solid modeling. It was done using a series of equally spaced cross sections. Sometimes in 2 different directions. It was up to the manufacturers to fill in the space between the sections. Think French Curve.