6 Replies Latest reply on Jul 25, 2018 9:12 AM by David Matula

    CAM plug in for Biesse Router

    Chad Huleatt

      My company recently purchased a 5 axis Biesse router.

       

      We are a sign company, and we use the router primarily for cutting out panels from 3mm aluminium, but also for more complex machining of 3d sign components (i.e. letters, logos)

       

      We're currently looking for a good plug in or stand alone program to program the parts. Most of our parts are fairly simple, but high volume. We've tried a few (b-solid, AlphaCam, enRoute) but aren't thrilled with the results, it's still a lot of work to program very simple parts.

       

      The CAM guy tells me that most of the decent plug ins (i.e. HSMworks) are designed for milling machines/ machining centres, not flat bed routers, so they don't include post processors for Biesse routers. He also told me that the biggest market for flat bed routers is the cabinetry industry, and the cabinet industry isn't that into solidworks.

       

      John Stoltzfus, you're company must use routers, what CAM package do you use?

       

      Here's a summary of our workflow at present. I'm talking about a fabricated aluminium "monument" type sign, with approx. 20 unique sheet metal parts.

       

      1. Model the parts/ assemblies using SSP technique
      2. Export DXF's of all parts using Customtools plug in (great add in, BTW)
      3. CAM guy programs parts off DXF
      4. Cut parts on router
      5. Fold parts on brake (we don't have off line programming for the brake)

       

      We're currently using SW 2016, but we are on the cusp of updating to 2018.

       

      Any advice would be appreciated!

        • Re: CAM plug in for Biesse Router
          John Stoltzfus

          Chad Huleatt  wrote:

           

          My company recently purchased a 5 axis Biesse router.

           

          We are a sign company, and we use the router primarily for cutting out panels from 3mm aluminium, but also for more complex machining of 3d sign components (i.e. letters, logos)

           

          We're currently looking for a good plug in or stand alone program to program the parts. Most of our parts are fairly simple, but high volume. We've tried a few (b-solid, AlphaCam, enRoute) but aren't thrilled with the results, it's still a lot of work to program very simple parts.

           

          The CAM guy tells me that most of the decent plug ins (i.e. HSMworks) are designed for milling machines/ machining centres, not flat bed routers, so they don't include post processors for Biesse routers. He also told me that the biggest market for flat bed routers is the cabinetry industry, and the cabinet industry isn't that into solidworks.

           

          John Stoltzfus, you're company must use routers, what CAM package do you use?

           

          Here's a summary of our workflow at present. I'm talking about a fabricated aluminium "monument" type sign, with approx. 20 unique sheet metal parts.

           

          1. Model the parts/ assemblies using SSP technique
          2. Export DXF's of all parts using Customtools plug in (great add in, BTW)
          3. CAM guy programs parts off DXF
          4. Cut parts on router
          5. Fold parts on brake (we don't have off line programming for the brake)

           

          We're currently using SW 2016, but we are on the cusp of updating to 2018.

           

          Any advice would be appreciated!

           

          Here we use AlphaCAM for our 3 Axis and 5 Axis machines, however for the 5 Axis we need to run to machining through TCAS to setup up the machining.

           

          If you have the latest and greatest AlphaCAM package you can pull parts right from the SW folder, but here we have an older version of AlphaCAM so then I save the parts as a parasolid and the programmer takes it from there.

          • Re: CAM plug in for Biesse Router
            Francisco Martínez

            I would use solid geometry inside of Alphacam if you are going to go to program 5 axis, I would not even attempt 5 axis with dxf's

             

            this is a part programmed straight from a solidworks part, I just import the SW file then auto extract features and auto Z tool paths and drills. The best part about Alphacam is the automation manager, you can pretty much program parts automatically

             

            acam.png

              • Re: CAM plug in for Biesse Router
                Chad Huleatt

                Thanks John Stoltzfus, Steve Crompton, David Matula Francisco Martínez.

                 

                Francisco Martínez wrote:

                 

                I would use solid geometry inside of Alphacam if you are going to go to program 5 axis, I would not even attempt 5 axis with dxf's

                 

                this is a part programmed straight from a solidworks part, I just import the SW file then auto extract features and auto Z tool paths and drills. The best part about Alphacam is the automation manager, you can pretty much program parts automatically

                 

                acam.png

                 

                The automation mentioned here is exactly what we are after, as our parts are all similar in terms of material thickness, types of features etc.

                 

                Anyone know if AlphaCam or MasterCam has a post processor for Biesse? I know Swood does.

                  • Re: CAM plug in for Biesse Router
                    David Matula

                    I am sure that they would be willing to make one if there is not one.  It is not that difficult to get a post processor program made.  We had a tech come look at the machine, and he looked at the G code that I  was producing and he did something at the machine and everything started working great, with what I was getting from the program I was using. 

                         The way I ended up finding my program was by calling my VAR.

                • Re: CAM plug in for Biesse Router
                  Steve Crompton

                  Hi

                   

                  We use Swood here. Plugs straight into solidworks. Basically you model your part in solidworks and you program that solidworks file. If the geometry stays the same but for a few sizes the program updates with your model. Its a pretty useful piece of software.

                   

                  Steve