96 Replies Latest reply on Oct 2, 2018 3:47 PM by Paul Risley

    Where do you see the future of CAD going?

    Paul Denino

      Like in the next 5-10 years, I guess.

       

      I'm doing a project for my high school and we have to ask other users of CAD software where they see the future of CAD going.

       

      Thanks!

        • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
          Glenn Schroeder

          In some industries (maybe most) it looks like there will be a continuing migration away from drawings.  The 3d model will be all the documentation.  With that being said, in my particular situation I don't foresee us ever getting away from them.

          • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
            Bob Van Dick

            Hands free using voice recognition.  Maybe even an interface that is manipulated by the brain.  I believe that these things are in their infancy now (being researched), but I think will become prevalent in the coming years....for the companies that can afford it.

            • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
              Chris Saller

              I agree with Glenn. Eventually drawings will go away. I can see maybe in 10-20 years everything will be straight to 3D printing, all automated. One day there will be no machinists.

                • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                  M. D.

                  As long as humans are a part of the workflow at any point or even just monitoring it, drawings will exist.  There has never been a time in human history that drawings have not existed, look at the cave paintings in France.

                    • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                      David Mandl

                      I would suggest that drawings would be removed in lieu of annotated 3D models.

                        • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                          Chris Saller

                          That is where I see them eventually headed. Everything will be MBD; models will be sent directly to 3D printers; models will be read directly into measuring devices to read the GD&T annotations. You can still print from the MBD.

                            • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                              David Mandl

                              I can envision the resistance being heavy.  People like having their paper drawings to scratch notes on as they go.

                                • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                  Steve Calvert

                                  And they like their paper drawings to build assemblies by, too.

                                   

                                  Models will go paperless first but the instructions will have to wait.

                                   

                                  Steve C

                                    • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                      Tony Tieuli

                                      Steve Calvert wrote:

                                       

                                      And they like their paper drawings to build assemblies by, too.

                                       

                                      Models will go paperless first but the instructions will have to wait.

                                       

                                      Steve C

                                      I don't disagree with any of the previous commenters. There will be heavy resistance to going paperless for all the reasons stated above.

                                      The old guard almost always resists change. The way they've always done it is the ONLY way it should be done.

                                      When I started in this industry all drafting was done on a drawing board with a Tee Square, triangles, scales etc. Does anyone here use those any more? Very few I'd wager. Even simple drawings are more easily done on the computer then printed.

                                      As young folks come into the industry our current methods will fade slowly away.

                                      If we could see 100 years into the future designing methods would look like magic to us.  "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." IMHO old Arthur had it right!

                                        • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                          M. D.

                                          I'm in the new guard but I am cognizant of history and how the human brain works.  2D simplifications will simply never go away.  There will always be some benefit from having the capability to simplify 3D reality into a 2D representation.

                                          • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                            Shawn Stugard

                                            I came into the industry right at the emergence of CAD. I had a drafting class in middle school where all the work was done with a pencil. IF you were able to complete the class project ahead of time (I did), you were allowed to use the single AutoCAD station (with the cross-hair puck thingy (mouse)). It was really treated as a novelty, at least in my class, but perhaps that was due to lack of equipment(budget).

                                             

                                            I tend to find some useful aspects to the resistance to change. That is the way that the kinks are worked out. The old guard will always as say "but, what if....", and those are nearly always valid questions, which in the infancy of any technology, will need to be addressed.

                                      • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                        M. D.

                                        Chris Saller wrote:

                                         

                                        That is where I see them eventually headed. Everything will be MBD; models will be sent directly to 3D printers; models will be read directly into measuring devices to read the GD&T annotations. You can still print from the MBD.

                                         

                                        If it is a 2D printout, then that is still what we are considering a "drawing".  A drawing is a 2D representation of a 3D object.

                                  • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                    Dennis Dohogne

                                    Chris Saller wrote:

                                     

                                    I agree with Glenn. Eventually drawings will go away. I can see maybe in 10-20 years everything will be straight to 3D printing, all automated. One day there will be no machinists.

                                    I do not see the day ever happening when there won't be mass production and the machines to produce it.  Yes, 3D printers have come a long way and do a lot, but the days of having a Star Trek replicator are going to be Sci-fi for millenia to come.  3D printing cannot produce things to the same economy nor properties of the current methods.  Will there ever be a 3D printed part that can achieve the results of a forged part?  Our grandchildren will be long gone before that happens.

                                      • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                        Glenn Schroeder

                                        Dennis Dohogne wrote:

                                         

                                        Chris Saller wrote:

                                         

                                        I agree with Glenn. Eventually drawings will go away. I can see maybe in 10-20 years everything will be straight to 3D printing, all automated. One day there will be no machinists.

                                        I do not see the day ever happening when there won't be mass production and the machines to produce it. Yes, 3D printers have come a long way and do a lot, but the days of having a Star Trek replicator are going to be Sci-fi for millenia to come. 3D printing cannot produce things to the same economy nor properties of the current methods. Will there ever be a 3D printed part that can achieve the results of a forged part? Our grandchildren will be long gone before that happens.

                                         

                                        I have to agree with you, but not necessarily for the same reason.  I work at a university-related testing laboratory.  We issue reports, which include details of what was tested.  I don't see how we can do that without drawings.

                                        • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                          Matt Peneguy

                                          Dennis Dohogne wrote:

                                           

                                          Chris Saller wrote:

                                           

                                          I agree with Glenn. Eventually drawings will go away. I can see maybe in 10-20 years everything will be straight to 3D printing, all automated. One day there will be no machinists.

                                          I do not see the day ever happening when there won't be mass production and the machines to produce it. Yes, 3D printers have come a long way and do a lot, but the days of having a Star Trek replicator are going to be Sci-fi for millenia to come. 3D printing cannot produce things to the same economy nor properties of the current methods. Will there ever be a 3D printed part that can achieve the results of a forged part? Our grandchildren will be long gone before that happens.

                                          Actually sometimes it can be more economical to 3D print things:

                                          Lockheed Martin creates its largest 3D-printed space part to date

                                          It's an awful article, but it is a good example.  In some cases it works out better and I really think we are just scratching the surface on 3D printing.  Remember what the assembly line did for production?  I'm wondering if we aren't on the cusp of something like that with 3D printing.  Maybe that will drive immense changes to 3D technology.  Remember 3D users are only a small number compared to how many people use 2D CAD.  If 3D printing makes it big, there will be a lot more investment on the software side and that's when we'll see incredible increases in 3D CAD usability...Maybe I'm just optimistic...

                                      • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                        Todd Blacksher

                                        I don't believe that we'll see the design set-up from Iron Man within the next 5 years, but I can see a lot more touch screen and portable accessibility (tablets & phones) happening in that time frame.

                                        This is something that I would be very happy to be wrong about, because it would be pretty awesome . . .

                                        • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                          Paul Salvador

                                          The future strategies, transformation and demands from emerging 3D markets.... (my guesstimate)

                                          Will it be radical, disruptive, innovative, conservative...or a whole series of life-cycle cost estimations with ratios, quotients, risk or return on investment,.. and the continuation of swapping out older software/hardware infrastructure for new hardware tools.. and people?

                                          ...Let's look deep into the crystal ball of CAD.....  I see no keyboards, no monitors, no mice, no desk,...  only Amazon thoughts and imaginative pre thoughts selling virtual assets... (with free shipping, of course).

                                          ..as we look further in the orb,.. old virtual assets are being sold at virtual flee markets called "RSVF"...(real stuff virtually flipped).

                                          ...going further...  we see,.. slate,.. paper,... pencils?

                                          • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                            M. D.

                                            Modeling in Virtual Reality.  Wearing the headgear and reaching out and touching and holding the part using tactile gloves and being able to pull one side to lengthen it, drill a hole in it with a virtual drill, rubbing the edges to add fillets, etc.

                                             

                                            Drawings will always exist.

                                            • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                              Rubén Rodolfo Balderrama

                                              Augmented Reality or similar....

                                              • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                Steve Calvert

                                                CAD in the Cloud was mentioned several years ago at Solidworks World and it's hear already.  I've seen and tested CAD in the Cloud (server) and was really impressed.  The graphics on the server end have gotten so much better that many users can be logged on at the same time and nothing is lost.  Our company is going to this before the year ends.

                                                 

                                                Steve C

                                                • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                  John Stoltzfus

                                                  We will be paperless within a year is my guess..

                                                  • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                    Frederick Law

                                                    Let get everyone to agree on a common 3D and 2D file format first.

                                                    • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                      Matt Lombard

                                                      Wow, you have to get up early with this crew. I've said this several times, but here's another opportunity.

                                                      I think the future of CAD is going to include more things like functional modeling, direct modeling and subd modeling, and less of history-based stuff. Drawings have been dying for the past 30 years if you listen to salesmen, but I don't see them ever going away 100%. Hell, people still listen to vinyl records.

                                                      • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                        Frederick Law

                                                        A better way to handle all the 3D scanned files.  A faster way to process and display those info.  The ability to modify them in VR.

                                                         

                                                        We're still mainly on 2D display, so 2D drawing will stay.  CAD might move to Tablet and Cell Phone and be more accessible.

                                                         

                                                        User interface need to change to allow interaction on screen or VR without mouse and keyboard.

                                                        • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                          Tom Gagnon

                                                          It's going pretty much to where it is now, as I see it. The more things change, the more things stay the same. I do not believe that this response is intended to provide a useful direct answer to OP's question asked, but rather to examine the question as less than a comprehensive view of the product, those who make it, those who sell it, those who buy it, those who use it, and those who consume the results in industrial and consumer contexts.

                                                           

                                                          There are (and will be) those who actively innovate, seeking to improve methods & tools, while driving productivity or reducing costs. Some of these efforts will not be profitable until ROI kicks in.

                                                           

                                                          There also are (and will be) those who rely on experience and stability, who do not want to change anything. These folks are generally risk-averse, particularly if investment is required. Increased productivity is generally mythic to these folks, and they'll solve a problem faster by applying more people to it instead of using a better tool or an unfamiliar process / technology.

                                                           

                                                          Also, salespeople do (and will continue to) misunderstand the industries they pander to, as much as most business owners misunderstand the details of the products sold. The only thing that bridges this gap is magical visualization, a rational (yet ungrounded in practical applications) animated visual presentation that promises instantaneous thought-to-product which over-simply represents a lot of actual work processes that will still need to happen in order to bring an idea to reality.

                                                          • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                            Wayne Schafer

                                                            For all you youngsters out there.  When I was young color TV's were pretty much not present at the time.  When I saw Dick Tracy talking to his wrist I thought that will not happen in my life time.  With that being said we are already bringing in holograms of ideas we have. So I can see the iron man design process as Todd Blacksher referenced too in the not so distant future.  I just hope I am a live to experience it.

                                                            • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                              Jeff Mowry

                                                              Yeah, never know for sure.  Might be using the light of the fire to draw on the cave wall with sticks blackened by the same.  But that's not very optimistic.

                                                               

                                                              I think it comes down to complexity.  Our systems have become incredibly complex over time, and necessarily fragile as a result.  Fragility is fine so long as all the variables behave as expected, but once they don't we have major problems and revert to simplified systems because simple is robust.  Simple is reliable.

                                                               

                                                              Voice-command stuff is mentioned, but I don't think I'd ever use that because it would be slower than what I can currently do with mouse/keyboard.  Not that the mouse/keyboard is really the best control interface, but it's one I and others have already mastered and it's cheap and reliable.  Seems to me voice command would be incredibly tedious (and sloooow---click three times or utter three sylables?).

                                                               

                                                              The Iron Man touch interface with lots of displays connected and interactable with gestures would be great.  I can see that as useful and usable, and not terribly complex, so that might eventually come around to being reality.  Relatively inexpensive, too, now that the glut of GPUs purchased for Bitcoin mining has probably waned sufficiently to put some excess supply in the market---use them for CAD, and use the supply pressure for improved development pressure on the GPU suppliers.  (Hey, I blame my engineering/design environment for my morbid hobby of economics, since that's where it all started.)

                                                              • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                Jeff Mowry

                                                                OK, I've got a better answer already.

                                                                 

                                                                I get lots of trade mags from various places and it seems all the CAD/engineering-related ones have an image of some type of analysis on the cover.  They've been stuck on analysis developments for a couple of years now.

                                                                 

                                                                So the medium-term future of CAD I would guess would be taking the material/weight/strength-optimized parts (from analysis) and figuring out how to feasibly manufacture them.  Ever see what this looks like?

                                                                sshot-2018-07-18-[09-50-56].png

                                                                From prismatic to organic.  Get rid of what's not needed and strip everything down to is necessary essentials.

                                                                sshot-2018-07-18-[09-49-49].png

                                                                What's this look like?  Bird bones, complete with marrow!  Parts like these are stronger, lighter, and more material-efficient.  But they're a pain to make.  Currently made mostly by additive processes such as metal SLS (or plastic, for plastic parts), but not easily molded, and therefore not easily mass-produced.  So we see things like this in projects with large budgets and small part counts where weight savings are a major concern (space, military, etc.).

                                                                 

                                                                So I think medium-range CAD will figure out how to help get these bird-bone parts into a more easily mass-manufacturable state.  Break the pieces down so they can be injection molded and easily assembled or something like that.  The automotive industry is already working on "light-weighting" to improve fuel efficiency and that's a mass-production market.  So I think they'll be some of the early adopters of pushing this envelope--from analysis through mass manufacturing.

                                                                  • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                    Kevin Quigley

                                                                    Generative design tech has been around nearly as long as 3D printing. I don't see that making much of an impact on a mass market system until additive production processes improve (speed, capacity, cost per unit, and materials). CAD vendors love to show this stuff but the reality is it has limited use. We have used this approach to lightweight and strengthen SLS nylon parts - and for us it was useful, but a limited use case. Mass market products are about volume, finish, low cost per unit. Where this tech will hit first is I think in sports goods for self protection - skinning a web with a rigid shell, allowing airflow. I've seen several exmples of this already.

                                                                     

                                                                    In any case generative design is unlikely to appear in any lower cost core CAD system - the mainstream vendors all charge top dollar for these add ons.

                                                                      • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                        J. Mather

                                                                        Kevin Quigley wrote:

                                                                        In any case generative design is unlikely to appear in any lower cost core CAD system ....

                                                                        Fusion 360

                                                                        • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                          Frederick Law

                                                                          Kevin Quigley wrote:

                                                                           

                                                                          I don't see that making much of an impact on a mass market system until additive production processes improve (speed, capacity, cost per unit, and materials).

                                                                          3D printing is not really slow.

                                                                          IMG_20171126_193243.jpg

                                                                          IMG_20171128_003312.jpg

                                                                          I printed this in 3 sections in 4 hours.  You maybe able to beat that on a high end 5 axis.  Compare to my $200 3D printer.

                                                                          Material cost is around $4.  Took less than 400Wh electricity.

                                                                           

                                                                          IMG_20180718_131519.jpg

                                                                          Printed in 2 hours.  Replace a molded nylon gear.  $2 in material.

                                                                           

                                                                          IMG_20180530_210700.jpg

                                                                          Printing in 2 color.  Could be 2 different material.

                                                                           

                                                                          On a $200 3D printer.

                                                                          How much for a 5 axis CNC?

                                                                          How much to make a mold?

                                                                          How much for a injection machine?

                                                                          How long does it take to get the first part out?

                                                                          How many 3D printer can you buy with that price?

                                                                            • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                              Kevin Quigley

                                                                              Some context here Frederick.

                                                                              I purchased my first "3D printed" parts in 1992 - using data generated in FormZ - on a Mac.

                                                                              Last year my small business purchased over £37k of SLS components - about 10,000 parts in total.

                                                                              We have an in house Stratasys uPrint FDM printer which is in constant use.

                                                                              What I'm trying to say is we know 3D printing inside out. 3D printing is a great technology but it will not replace injection moulding, CNC, casting etc any time soon. When I talk about mass market I am talking about products that sell in thousands and up. This is our core project base. For production quantities, with high quality finishes, consistent part dimensions, consistent material strength, reliable fracture characteristics, etc etc 3D printing does not cut it. However for low volume, physically smallish (but not too small), not too critical on close tolerances, surface finishes not important out the box, non cost critical parts, or prototypes of any kind, 3D printing is a perfect technology.

                                                                               

                                                                              But let's not pretend you can produce 100,000 parts for a complex moulding, for something the size of a basketball, for under £4 each (incluiding tool ammortisation) in a certified polymer, with closely defined surface finish and mutliple critical fit tolerances, using any current 3D printing technology. Because you cannot. 3D printing is a great technology, just not for that.

                                                                          • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                            M. D.

                                                                            Automotive?  How about aircraft.  Drones, personal flying vehicles, etc.

                                                                          • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                            Kevin Quigley

                                                                            CAD in next 5-10 years?

                                                                             

                                                                            Vendors - some consolidation, but likely still the same.

                                                                            Modelling technology - more integration with sub divisional modelling and nurbs modelling approaches (ref. Creo/Fusion 360/vectorWorks or SolidWorks with Power Surfacing add on). More non NURBs geometry handling - meshes and point clouds. Likely better integration between meshes/nurbs/point clouds for viewing and modelling operations. Apart from that, not much.

                                                                            Interfaces technology - more pen based input - like to start to see seamless input between devices - sketch on a tablet, see the outcome immediately on a linked desktop. We will still use keyboards and mice. Very likely to see a major advancement in AR input devices in this timeframe. I see AR much more useful that VR for CAD design in general. A glasses type input device is less obtrusive than a full immersive VR headset. I really don't see full VR being used for commercial CAD/design for 3D sketching (haptic or otherwise). I've tried lots of these techs over the last few years and they are all basic, slow and frankly inefficient. Where I do see immersive VR being useful is in sharing designs for review across different locations.

                                                                            Workflows - more acceptance of MBD, but drawings will still be here and strong in 10 years. Why? because the work revolves around documentation, and even the most modern interface tools are aimed at scribbling on paper (Apple pencil on iPad for markups is an example). Also you still need to print stuff out. I still design on paper and tracing paper from print outs. I sketch, overlay, test, etc. PDF is king but paper is still the currency of contracts and technical files! I see more use of sharing 3D data for review, rather than screenshots/PDFs though. But for this to happen the review technolohy has to be better/easier to use/easier to markup. This is what I see the tablet+pencil best for. we already do this but most do not. Shared 3D files via things like GrabCAD WorkBench have, for us, become the norm. This will become standard for everyone and replace E drawings and other desktop install viewers. Everything for viewing will be browser based.

                                                                            Costs - Depends on how you look at this. Startup costs will decrease. Costs over time will increase. Subscription is the only route now. As an example we subscribe to Fusion 360 and Creo. We would not be using Creo if we had to buy a license. that big £7k hit (or in our case likely a £11k hit as we use ISDX as well) would be impossible for a micro business to sustain. I don't see subscription costs reducing. I don't see Autodesk keeping the low cost Fusion 360 version either. I expect that to start to increase in cost year on year now.

                                                                            Training - This will move entirely to online, even as 1 to 1 VAR supported training. As network speeds and capacity increases (5G), companies will not be able to justify the cost of sending staff off for days on end to attend training classes. Trainings will change to 1-2 hr sessions, self paced courses or 1 to 1 short sessions. Training will become a major factor in how users access their CAD platform, and it will enable users to assess different platforms. Having inadequate online training resources, or relying on freebie YouTube videos will not cut it any longer. I have to say, the likes of PTC University and Autodesk online training are good examples of what can be done. The PTC stuff especially is very high quality, varied, detailed and professionally created training - and included in the subscription costs (unlike SolidWorks where you need to buy an extra MySolidWorks Professional package to get access to everything - and even when there it is not that good).

                                                                             

                                                                            I think that should take us to 2028!

                                                                            • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                              Chris Saller

                                                                              My son has his PhD in Material Science Engineering. In college he created 3D printed Titanium engine blades, at the same time controlling the grain structure. Very strong and light parts! Awesome! I can't say who he made them for.

                                                                              • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                                Ryan Navarro

                                                                                CAD is a pretty mature industry and in mature industries I believe the best way to predict the near-term future is from looking at trends.

                                                                                 

                                                                                There are some great industry surveys out there that can help predict current trends, most comprehensive one I am aware of would be CAD Trends survey-

                                                                                2017 Global CAD Trends from Business Advantage

                                                                                 

                                                                                From there you can see the fastest growth areas are not in CAD itself, but related areas of CAE/FEA, 3D Printing, PDM file management, PLM product management, Cloud software, CAM software etc.

                                                                                 

                                                                                Disruptive change is possible but I think core CAD 5-10 years from now will still be very recognizable and familiar compared to what we have today, with incremental improvements.

                                                                                 

                                                                                Where we will see the most drastic change is the adoption of more tools that take advantage of the "promise" of 3D CAD like Simulation, MBD, CAM, etc.

                                                                                 

                                                                                As more and more users adopt these tools, the market grows larger, and you will see more and more CAD software development focus on these features to stay relevant in the competitive landscape.

                                                                                 

                                                                                Sorry if that is an unexciting answer

                                                                                  • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                                    M. D.

                                                                                    Growth is wherever the money is.  Assuming Solidworks made 100 million dollars on their 2018 update, which seems like it could be made by a group of guys in a basement for a couple weeks, this is where the growth opportunity is.  The only hurdle a new disruptive upstart has is to allow editing and saving to .sld files.  Just like there was a huge market for anyone to make a fully IBM compatible PC in the 80's.

                                                                                  • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                                    J. Mather

                                                                                    Was the assignment due yesterday?

                                                                                    • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                                      Paul Denino

                                                                                      Wow! Thank you everyone for your responses and efforts to help out! I'm blown away by the amount of responses and the willingness to participate! I'm sure to get an A!

                                                                                      • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                                        Harold Black

                                                                                        For me, I hope to see some kind of augmented reality interface where we can model our parts using hand gestures and fingers.

                                                                                        • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                                          James Riddell

                                                                                          To Infinity and Beyond!

                                                                                          • Re: Where do you see the future of CAD going?
                                                                                            Paul Risley

                                                                                            Where do I see Cad going?

                                                                                             

                                                                                            Allowable new interfaces.

                                                                                             

                                                                                            For a majority of companies MBD and paperless.

                                                                                             

                                                                                            In my field there is no solution via 3d printing or MBD that will satisfy the end use criteria for some of the parts we make. We also utilize 3 bridgeport manual mills and 2 manual lathes on a daily basis.

                                                                                             

                                                                                            As far as Cad I see there being a developed cloud that is security level based in the future so the storage requirements on machines become less and less. I also see there eventually being a web based application that runs as fast on a 5000 or 1500 dollar computer. The market is there and it will be a reality some day.

                                                                                             

                                                                                            On a side note as most know the driving force and investment for 3d printing is and will continue to be  the aerospace field. These are the companies that have the most to gain. We looked into a coupe of Mark forged printers and while some have some serious power there is not enough there to do what we do and maintain material/ tolerance controls that we use or need.

                                                                                             

                                                                                            One of the biggest limitations is while they can run parts in tool steels and alloys they still need to be post op treated which in of itself lends problems. 3d print a part to model and it has warp after heat treat or other process, now what can you do? Make a secondary model with all excess material in where you think it will be warping and distorted? Then post grind/ machine part into spec? For the cost of the machine and on a per piece return rate there was no value for us at this time.

                                                                                             

                                                                                            I would love to just hit print and make parts, the technology is just not there yet. It might not be in my lifetime. But as far as cad goes there is plenty of opportunity for leaps and bounds improvements.