17 Replies Latest reply on Jul 5, 2018 3:15 PM by Jeff Mowry

    Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?

    Alex Lachance

      Hello,

       

      I just upgraded a workstation from Windows 7 to Windows 10. The workstation is a HP Workstation Z440 with a FirePro W7100 graphic card. When I start SolidWorks I get a message that my driver might be outdated. I've looked on the SolidWorks website and it seems there is no certified driver for a FirePro W7100 ran on Windows 10.

       

       

      Why is that? I understand this graphic card dates back to 2014 but it should have certified drivers for Windows 10 which came out in mid 2015...

        • Re: Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?
          Alex Lachance

          Not only that, it's as if a WorkStation Z440 or the FirePro weren't compatible with SolidWorks 2018 either since the SolidWorks version isn't available in the menu either...

           

          What now, do I need to switch computers to upgrade?

           

          • Re: Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?
            David Rogger

            The company has still not launched the latest version support for Windows 10 that is why it not showing in the list. You can check manually in google for the windows 10 version. I have asked Microsoft Support UK if they can help somehow regarding this matter.

            • Re: Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?
              Paul Salvador

              Alex,... looks like someone at SW Corp is NOT doing their job?

              - And How Can This Be? - Dune (1984) 

              • Re: Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?
                Alex Lachance

                Errrr.... Just got an answer from my VAR, I must say, I feel stupid...

                 

                Apparently I was refining my search too much.  If I set the system vendor to  any system vendor instead of HP then the drivers appears. He has no idea why it won't appear when the search is refined...

                 

                Edit: Apparently it is because SolidWorks has tested the graphic card but not the combination with a Workstation Z440.

                 

                • Re: Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?
                  Jeff Mowry

                  I'm interested to know if you see any discernible difference in the speed of the computer between Windows 7 and 10.  I'd expect it to seem slightly slower with Windows 10, particularly if you "upgraded" to Windows 10 rather than installing a fresh copy of 10.

                    • Re: Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?
                      Alex Lachance

                      There are 3 workstations that were upgraded about 4 months ago and the engineers running them haven't noticed a difference in speed. We're upgrading the draftsman right now and I don't think we'll see much of a difference as one of my consultant went through the same process and didn't get any problem or notice any slow downs. We'll have to wait and see tough, I'm not really thrilled to be moving to Windows 10 to be honest.

                        • Re: Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?
                          Jeff Mowry

                          Thanks for the quick reply!

                           

                          If this wasn't a fresh reinstall, I'll let you know I've seen several issues in the upgrade with software and drivers (not SolidWorks, but I've never run SolidWorks on Windows 10 either) that can cause hangs and crashes.

                           

                          Windows 7 is still my favorite to work with, though I like some of the interface updates in Windows 10.

                            • Re: Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?
                              Alex Lachance

                              Yes, I've had the drivers mess themselves up as well but that is casual behavior when you upgrade and once you know that that is the problem it is generally easy to fix.

                                • Re: Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?
                                  Jeff Mowry

                                  In my experience it's appearing more and more likely that Adobe software---particularly their Creative Cloud stuff---may be causing crashes.  Not everyone uses Adobe stuff, but many do.  Most advice I've seen on the topic (Adobe or not) is to install a fresh copy of Windows 10.

                                   

                                  One customer of mine even had the Windows 7 jingle when starting his upgraded Windows 10 machine.  That oddity tells me there are likely many such unexpected relics left behind (and not properly over-written) with a mere upgrade.

                                   

                                  Sorry---not trying to discourage you with all this so much as to gain insight from your experience and learn more on my side.  The switch to Windows 10 is an eventuality I face myself (with dread) since finding hardware compatible with Windows 7 is getting extremely difficult.

                                    • Re: Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?
                                      Alex Lachance

                                      I'm guessing some people have tricks that others do not. Something as simple as ''Run as administrator'' could be the difference maker in having bugs and not having bugs. As far as I'm aware we didn't do anything special in order to upgrade besides download the language packs individually and make sure the drivers were compatible.

                                       

                                      No worries, you're not discouraging me, it's part of the process

                                  • Re: Graphic card driver, operating system unavailable?
                                    Dan Pihlaja

                                    I originally posted this here (seems to have relevance here as well):  The "Kitty Dump" - Watercooler - Trash it Here - Food For Thought - Or Whatever else floats your boat, your Car, Truck, BMX or your Horse

                                     

                                    I like Windows 10, for the most part.

                                    One thing with Windows 10 that I don't like however, is the difference between shut down and reboot.

                                     

                                    Quote from a blog post summarizing it:

                                    If Fast Start/Boot is enabled (which it is by default) then a Shut Down is not a full, complete shut down but is an abbreviated form of hibernation and uses a hibernation file.  In true, full hibernation when the system is being shut down a file image of the OS state as well as the application program states are written out to disc for retrieval when the machine is turned back on.  When Fast Startup/Boot is enabled, the hibernation only includes the OS state, not the application program states, but these are still written out to disc for retrieval when the system is fired up again.

                                     

                                    By contrast, Restart intentionally saves absolutely nothing regarding the OS state or the applications states.  After shutting down it reloads the OS from scratch from the disc drive files that make up the OS.

                                     

                                    To me, the above architecture is precisely the opposite of what I think a default shut down and restart would and should logically do (and actually did do, at least with regard to a shut down, in Windows 7 and earlier).  However, once you know this you are able to make the correct choice for what you're trying to achieve.

                                     

                                    If you go to the Power Options dialog if Control Panel, activate the "Choose what the power button does" link and then, on the page that comes up, the "Change settings that are currently unavailable" link the checkboxes for the four power state tweaks will become accessible.  You can add or remove Hibernate or Sleep from the Power menu, tweak how/when the lock screen appears, but most importantly you can choose to turn Fast Startup/Boot off.  If you do this, then choosing to shut down does an actual full shutdown with no abbreviated hibernation component involved.  When you power up again the OS must load completely from disc like it would for a Restart.  I disabled this option long ago because I didn't see that big a difference in boot time and, more importantly, when I do a shut down I want everything about the current system state to be tossed and a fresh reload of the full OS when I start the machine next time.