12 Replies Latest reply on Mar 12, 2019 6:29 PM by Christian Chu

    Video card and hard drive to run solid works

    Jerome Ziegler

      Does anyone recommend a good Video card to run solids works as well as a hard drive I am considering a new computer and it has this video card  NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 1070 with 8GB GDDR5 Overclocked  and the hard drive is  512GB PCIe SSD (Boot)   1TB 7200RPM SATA 6Gb/s  Any advise is appreciated thanks in advance

        • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
          Christian Chu

          Check list of certified video card from SW and you need you tell us how you use SW for your work?

          Your HD 512 SSD is fine

            • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
              Jerome Ziegler

              I will be attending college for engineering in the fall and will be learning solid works

              I would like to be able to build 3d models to send to shapeways for printing in either

              resin or metal. some of the models will be freeform shapes i.e. faces, hands, floral elements,

              and want to print so that the wall thickness is minimal. So I would model the outer surface

              and offset and want to create thin enough walls to print.

                • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
                  Christian Chu

                  Jerome Ziegler wrote:

                   

                  I will be attending college for engineering in the fall and will be learning solid works

                  I would like to be able to build 3d models to send to shapeways for printing in either

                  resin or metal. some of the models will be freeform shapes i.e. faces, hands, floral elements,

                  and want to print so that the wall thickness is minimal. So I would model the outer surface

                  and offset and want to create thin enough walls to print.

                  You can use any low-end certified video card as SW is more CPU than GPU

                  The fact is, if you just model some simple stuff, you can run SW on a game card !

                  Here is the FX570 from Amazon which I paid about $50 from eBay 6 yrs ago (about $300 from Newegg at that time) and it's decent card on my son computer now

              • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
                Glenn Schroeder

                Go here to evaluate your initial selection.  I suspect you won't get good results with the GeForce card.

                • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
                  David Matula

                  HP work stations are awesome especially if you served in the military.  

                  MySolidBox has a great program for buying computers also.

                  You will get a great computer for that you need from them.

                   

                  The HP you have to pick the right one and that is where knowing what works and does not work comes into play.

                  • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
                    Tom Gagnon

                    See Graphics Card Drivers | Hardware & System Requirements | SOLIDWORKS which Christian referenced.

                    I can advise you to avoid GeForce cards outright. If it is supported, I'll be greatly surprised. If a PC with a supported card is not easily available to buy, then buy a PC without a graphics card, and add one that is supported as a separate purchase. If buying from a box store like Best Buy, WalMart, or for the most part even online stores like NewEgg, then the majority of their advanced offerings will be aimed at gamers. These are rarely appropriate for SWx, but are usually able to perform adequately (making you believe it is okay) until they do not, and then you have no easy fix for starting with wrong vid card.

                     

                    I agree with Christian's advice, in particular to what you want to do with SWx, to invest in CPU more than graphics card. If you were making drawings of very large assemblies, or producing renderings or walkthrough videos, then the quality of the graphics card becomes far more relevant.

                    • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
                      Jason Edelman

                      I would recommend a refurbished mobile workstation with the biggest Nvidia Quadro you can afford. What is your budget?

                      • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
                        Matt Peneguy

                        From my interpretation of complexity of work you will be doing the most important thing to get is a supported video card.  You can make a Geforce work; but, you really have to know what you are doing. The video card you get doesn't have to be expensive, and I think the one Christian Chu posted should work.  Make sure to check the hardware requirements page at the SW site for the version of SW you will be using to make sure there is a driver listed for the card if you do go with a 6 year old card.

                         

                        I did see a little more recent card listed for $75, Amazon.com: NVIDIA Quadro 600 by PNY 1GB DDR3 PCI Express Gen 2 x16 DVI-I DL and DisplayPort OpenGL, DirectX, CUDA, and … But, again, it is an old card and you may do fine with.  For a little more you can get what looks like the newest generation with 2GB of Ram for $125, https://www.amazon.com/PNY-NVIDIA-Quadro-Professional-Graphics/dp/B06X9PW5DZ/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=152907… And it should be supported for a while.

                         

                        The HD should be an SSD.  It's not required; but if you can afford it, get one even if you have to forego the 1TB drive you listed.

                         

                        For general use in SW clockspeed is more important than the number of cores.  So, it may be better to get a higher clocked i5 than an i7 with a lower clock speed at the same price.

                         

                        8GB should be fine unless you start getting into complex assemblies or surfacing...But, more Ram is always nice.  And if necessary you can always add it later.

                        • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
                          Michael Lade

                          I have a similar question.

                           

                          I'm going to purchase a laptop to use with the maker's edition of SW (no large assemblies, no simulation, etc.) but don't want to buy a mobile workstation, as even the refurbs I've seen float around $1500 - $2000 (I prefer to stay away from used).

                           

                          Does anyone have suggestions and / or experience using a standard card instead? I'm assuming they will be less expensive.

                           

                          I did see Christian's post above, which provide's some solace, but wanted to get a little more info / specifics from experienced users before pulling the trigger.

                           

                          FYI, I'll probably spend a little extra for a good CPU.

                           

                          Thanks.

                            • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
                              David Matula

                              really don't recommend using a uncertified card.  I had a gaming machine from dell once....it sucked, finely got a certified card for the video and it quit crashing but it still took forever to make a part or assembly.  if time is not something that your conserned with and you like to rework and work around crashes you can run solidworks on a computer.  It just may not be optimal.  I don't even like to brows the web with the $100 dell I got since that thing is slow,

                              • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
                                Frederick Law

                                My Dell e7240 laptop use HD4400 graphic, old and non-certified.

                                It run SW 2018 and 2019.  Also Inventor, Cura, HearthStone.  I don't use it heavily.  Open and view assemblies.  Make some changes.

                                Works good.

                                 

                                Workstation at work use GTX1070, still non-certified.  No more crash then other user here.

                                This is the main 10 hours a day.

                                 

                                There is not much you can do with CPU.  Highest clock you can afford.  Core count doesn't help.

                                I'll take an i7 or i5 4 cores with 4GHz or more.

                                Fast menory and fast SSD on M.2 or PCIe.

                                • Re: Video card and hard drive to run solid works
                                  Christian Chu

                                  Michael Lade wrote:

                                   

                                  I have a similar question.

                                   

                                  I'm going to purchase a laptop to use with the maker's edition of SW (no large assemblies, no simulation, etc.) but don't want to buy a mobile workstation, as even the refurbs I've seen float around $1500 - $2000 (I prefer to stay away from used).

                                   

                                  Does anyone have suggestions and / or experience using a standard card instead? I'm assuming they will be less expensive.

                                   

                                  I did see Christian's post above, which provide's some solace, but wanted to get a little more info / specifics from experienced users before pulling the trigger.

                                   

                                  FYI, I'll probably spend a little extra for a good CPU.

                                   

                                  Thanks.

                                  Michael,

                                  If you don't run SW with a large assembly or simulation. Then non-certified card is ok

                                  My VP boss is running SW on a business ThinkPad laptop which he can open the big assembly for viewing and create some simple part or assembly