54 Replies Latest reply on Jun 7, 2018 6:01 PM by Eric Eubanks

    What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?

    Eric Eubanks

      I know I could just search "solidworks entry level", but I want to try and get more specific. What job titles should I be searching for? I don't have an engineering degree. I just want to use solidworks. I want to try learning on the job. I've been in school for almost 3 years.

        • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
          Maha Nadarasa

          It is up to the supply and demand. If supply of SWX freaks are less than the job market demand, you will easily get an entry level position, otherwise it is not easy. I do not know situation in your country.

           

          Good example is IT industries in India. At the inception of the IT industries in India there was a heavy demand for computer programmers. What industries did were they hired engineers and trained them as programmers. Today situation has changed IT industries have reached a saturation level. New software engineers have to wait in job seeks queue.   

          • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
            John Pesaturo

            Eric, keep it simple and see what's out there ... Simply search for "Solidworks" or a variant of being "Solid Works" and you should be on the right track. Additionally, looking through the postings under such a general term may return any number of other more specific job titles/descriptions for you to further refine your search criteria.

             

            Some other general terms which are hit or miss in my book are CAD, CAD Designer, Draftsman, Draftsperson, Design Engineer and Manufacturing Engineer but the results from searches along those lines in my opinion tend to return a lot of architectural, mill work and land surveyor type jobs that more often than not use ACAD or similar software. Again though, just peruse through them and see if you can't further define exactly what it is you're looking to get into.

             

            Good luck out there ...

            • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
              Steve Calvert

              We Had:

               

              Drafter

              Drafter II

              Lead Drafter

              Designer

              Lead Designer

               

              Each level was more responsibility and more CAD time.  I was all them and now I'm an Assoc HW Engineer, all without a degree

               

              Steve C

              • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                Glenn Schroeder

                I'd encourage you to find a field that you're interested in, and look within that.  The days will go by much faster, plus if you have any practical, hands-on experience that will almost certainly help get your foot in the door.

                • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                  Dave Bear

                  Hi Eric,

                  I'm not sure how old you are exactly but I get the impression that you are relatively young. I have witnessed your fair share of difficulties with trying to accomplish things in SolidWorks (just like I've have) and think that trying to find an entry level position using SolidWorks may be just a bit ambitious at this stage. Now, that may sound harsh, but I say this with a good intention. I personally think that it would be better for you to find a position within a machine shop or engineering factory, something along those lines. You would then be able to use what you learn there and apply it to how you would produce/create/manufacture things in the real world and SolidWorks. This is not to say that you can't let the company know that you have an avid interest in CAD (SolidWorks) and see if they let you sit a few hours a week under someone's guidance until you become more proficient.

                   

                  Failing that, my other suggestion to you would be to do much more comprehensive study. Do all of the tutorials over and over and over until they are second nature. Sometimes you may ask a question that is covered by the tutorials and is quite basic, try to gets the basics under your belt first. Buy recommended books. Even download simple models from sites and then roll them back to the beginning and follow them through each feature on the feature tree so that you can see how they were created. And then, when more proficient, look at entry level SolidWorks positions.

                   

                  Once again, I just don't want you to be disillusioned and get your ambitions confused with your capabilities. A little time fully invested by yourself now will pay off big time for you in the long run.

                   

                  Dave.

                    • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                      Maha Nadarasa

                      Dave Bear wrote:

                       

                      Do all of the tutorials over and over and over until they are second nature.

                       

                      It is a good point. A quote by some one:

                       

                      "Don't do something until you get it right, do it until you can't get it wrong."

                      • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                        J. Mather

                        Dave Bear wrote:

                        I personally think that it would be better for you to find a position within a machine shop or engineering factory, something along those lines. You would then be able to use what you learn there and apply it to how you would produce/create/manufacture things in the real world and SolidWorks.

                        Dave.

                        Eric Eubanks, based on Dave Bear's response above - take a look at the attached SolidWorks file.

                        Can you tell me at least three things that are wrong with the design?

                        (This is about as simple and basic as it gets.)

                        I have already given you what should be an unnecessary advantage by indicating something is wrong with the geometry.

                        You should be able to recognize the issues without prompting - from an old TV show, "Grasshopper, when you can snatch the pebble from my hand, then you are ready (can go)."

                         

                        Others, don't give away the answers, but Kudos to all who find all of the issues.

                        Remember - reference Dave's advice.

                        I'll post back my key once Eric has had a chance to review.

                          • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                            Eric Eubanks

                            I found one so far. Still looking for the other 2.

                             

                            The max dimension in sketch 1 needs to be something simpler.

                            Can you have a fraction and decimal dimension in the same part?

                             

                            Edit: Also a .46875 dimension in sketch 4

                             

                            Edit: Is there supposed to be 2 solid bodies?

                              • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                J. Mather

                                Forget for a few minutes that it is SolidWorks.

                                SolidWorks is just a virtual modeling tool.

                                Same as a Lathe or Milling Machine are tools for making physical parts.

                                 

                                Look at the geometry - what is wrong with the design?

                                  • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                    Eric Eubanks

                                    One thing I found. I don't see a way to open the clamp.

                                    Edit: I found the original part on mcmaster carr. It looks the same. Is there something wrong with the original design or do I just need to look harder to find the difference? It doesn't seem like the professionals that put stuff on that website would make a clamp that you can't open.

                                     

                                    Edit: I compared the mass properties between yours and the original and it's exactly the same. It looks like there's something wrong with the original design rather than something you added to test me.

                                  • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                    J. Mather

                                    Eric Eubanks wrote:

                                     

                                    Edit: Is there supposed to be 2 solid bodies?

                                    You tell me.

                                    I would expect a potential hire to be able to argue with me with supporting statements of evidence if I took a position that contradicts their understanding and experience with mechanisms/assemblies.

                                    Yes, there are supposed to be two bodies. (We can ignore that it would actually be an assembly - but that might be part of the argument).

                                     

                                    Here are the issues that "smack me in the face".

                                     

                                    1. The OD of part would be made on a lathe.  The lathe produces cylindrical features.

                                    Note in this sectional view that there is a flat on the outside of the part.  This might be OK of the flat was milled after turning the cylinder on the lathe.  But this part as designed is NOT cylindrical.

                                    1b. But knowing the function of the part it gets even bigger problem on the ID of the part.  The ID would be drilled and finished bored on the lathe in same set-up. A "negative" cylinder feature.  The part as designed is not cylindrical bore.  The same flat on inside of bore.  The part as designed will not function as intended.

                                    I will get argument, "But this is just... blah blah blah..."

                                     

                                    Section View.png

                                    2. There is no clearance for the head of the fastener.

                                    I will get argument, "But this is just... blah blah blah..."

                                     

                                    3. There no clearance for the shank of the fastener on the non-threaded side of the hole.

                                    I will get argument, "But this is just... blah blah blah..."

                                     

                                    4. The tap drill size is wrong - there will be no material in which to cut the threads.

                                    I will get argument, "But this is just... blah blah blah..."

                                     

                                    Fastener Interface.png

                                     

                                    5. Dan Pihlaja also pointed out that the material not assigned - Extra Credit to Dan.

                                     

                                    Now back to respond to the arguments:

                                    I have been doing this stuff for 40 yrs, out on the shop floor, in R&D, in the office and in the classroom.

                                    In my experience the, "But this is just... blah blah blah..." gets carried over by the person doing the arguing into their critical work and all work.

                                     

                                    No time was saved by modeling the part incorrectly in SolidWorks.

                                    It would have been faster to model the cylinder and hole as, well, cylinders - just like out on the shop floor.

                                    SolidWorks will give you the correct hole for the fastener - so it is faster to do it correctly than to do it incorrectly, and even if done manually - it should be done correctly.

                                     

                                    I have seen more issues with threaded fastener holes done incorrectly (in CAD) than perhaps any other single issue.

                                    It stuns me how every single year I will cover threads and fasteners in the classroom and then in lab the students forget everything I just covered and wonder why their tap doesn't produce any threads.

                                     

                                    I spent 8 yrs out on the shop floor.  Here is what is going to happen.

                                    An experienced machinist is going to instantly recognize the true design intent and make the part correctly.

                                    Case 1 - Best case - they come to your office and tell you, and you fix up the documentation.

                                    Case 2 - they fix the issue, but never tell you - it becomes part of the un-documented "tribal knowledge".  (What happens to that knowledge if the person gets run over by a bus on the way home?)

                                    Case 3 - they run to the boss and say, "Look what this idiot wants me to do...."

                                    Case 4 - See Case 2, but they don't get run over by the bus, but first time next time they scrap a part that you didn't document the best, they will also pull this one out of their back pocket when they run to the boss to cover their tracks.  Who gets thrown under the bus now?

                                    Case 5 - New machinist or a problem that isn't so evident as this particular one, but same foundational source - fail to model it right, fully constrain sketches... …use the CAD tool to do the engineering and design and parts get scrapped.  I am sure any experienced user here can cite example after example after example.

                                     

                                    So this one was trivially simple, "And this one was just blah blah blah..."

                                    So what happens when we get to complicated geometry???

                                  • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                    Dan Golthing

                                    ok, now do one with a drawing...

                                      • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                        J. Mather

                                        Dan Golthing wrote:

                                        ok, now do one with a drawing...

                                        I will be happy to show you how to do the drawing for the part - but first, can you attach your attempt?

                                         

                                        Edit:  Oops, or did you mean attach a drawing challenge example here? Something that an employer might give to a prospective hire?

                                        • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                          J. Mather

                                          Dan Golthing wrote:

                                           

                                          ok, now do one with a drawing...

                                          Here is a drawing.

                                          The design intent is for part of a drilling/punching tool for drilling a hole in the side of a thin wall aluminum tubing.

                                          As the drill passes through the wall a dimple is formed in the wall with the punch.  (Frame tubing for lawn furniture.)

                                           

                                          Model the part from the dimensions shown.

                                          Why 3D.PNG

                                          The hidden line around the hole circle in the top view is for a Chamfer on the bottom of the part. (it is not a thread)

                                    • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                      Glenn Schroeder

                                      Dave Bear  is a smart man, and gave excellent advice.  Knowing how to actually build or fabricate something will be more valuable in the workplace than knowing how to use the software without practical knowledge.

                                      • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                        Richard Ahlgrim

                                        I will strongly endorse the comments from Glenn Schroeder and Dave Bear.

                                         

                                        Starting out you don't always have the option, but working in a field that you are interested in has a lot of value.

                                         

                                        Learning or knowing SW is a valuable asset but putting some effort into gaining some knowledge in drafting, design, basic engineering and manufacturing will pay off in the long run more than anything.

                                         

                                        I've been around since the world was making the transition from the drawing board to CAD. Back then I had management that seemed to focus on finding people fresh out of "AutoCAD school" regardless of any other skills they had. I always tried to convince them knowing AutoCAD didn't help much if they had no experience in drafting/design. It's easier to teach a draftsman CAD than it is teaching a CAD guy drafting.

                                        • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                          Vladimir Urazhdin

                                          Eric,

                                          If you start your carrier in production industry from the shop floor, it would be very hard to jump up to designer office (unless lucky break suddenly happened).

                                          Let me give you a couple of advises:

                                          1. To promote yourself on the job market try to get some SW Certification (SW Associate Mechanical Design – the lowest degree is OK too). It will give you a real advantage among competitors like you when HR Manager takes a look at your resume.

                                          2. Stay visible. Publish your resume online. Use web sites of recruiting companies.

                                          3. Expend your search beyond your area. Be ready to travel and change your current residence.

                                          Good luck

                                          Vlad

                                          • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                            Paul Risley

                                            Eric, does your school have a placement counsel?

                                            That should be your first stop.

                                            Secondly did you build a relationship with any of your instructors during your 3 years? If so use them for a sounding board as to the direction and maybe they might know a company in the area that is looking for a "green" drafter/ designer.

                                             

                                            While I agree to an extent with Dave Bear about getting practical experience, there are some pitfalls to that path. The first being on average there are 8-12 employees on the floor to every designer.(This is my experience) It could be more depending on where you go. So this would limit the potential to move up.

                                             

                                            My opinion has always been the same for anyone stepping into our doors to become a designer. I can teach you Solidworks or I can teach you how things work, but I cannot teach you both.

                                             

                                            I know you have struggled at times with the software from some of your previous posts, but your ability to stick with it and move forward and finish what you started shows you are motivated to finish a job.

                                             

                                            My last suggestion is if you do get an interview be honest and forthright about your abilities. Do not oversell your ability to use the software. Most companies do have schedules in place for bringing in new people. They usually revolve around detailing first to learn how things are designed. Then moving up to basic modelling and finally start working your way into simple assemblies up to complex builds.

                                             

                                            Key words to look for:

                                            Drafter

                                            Designer

                                            Mechanical designer

                                            Solidworks

                                            CAD(This one is iffy just because it is so vague)

                                            Detailer

                                             

                                            Good luck on your search.

                                            • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                              Kevin Chandler

                                              Hello,

                                               

                                              In addition to the above, I suggest learning the appropriate drawing standards available from ASME.org so your documents have an aura of professionalism.

                                               

                                              Mr. Bear is correct, it's best to learn what's practical and economical and to understand the impacts of all the tidbits, checks and options you select in SW (with such little effort and with equal ease).

                                              Plus, when someone who knows what they're doing tells you something, not only will you be better able to understand it, you'll be better able to apply it.

                                               

                                              Be careful about the position you apply for. Read carefully & inquire about the scope of expected duties.

                                              Also be careful not to dismiss an opportunity if it doesn't seem "all-encompassing", because none are. That's something you furnish.

                                              Be careful on how you approach the scope of duties with the hiring types so that you don't come across as an "overshooter", one who is already looking beyond the current offering.

                                              You're being hired to fulfill current requirements (& future ones too) so looking beyond too much won't look good for you as a prospective candidate.

                                              If they smell it on you and "kinda" ask you about it, just cover yourself by saying something like, "I'm making sure I understand your current expectations."

                                              If you're in your tender years, look into taking a floating type position, one where you will encounter more aspects. Breadth and depth.

                                              • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                Doug Seibel

                                                Internship.

                                                 

                                                If you go on Indeed.com and search for "Solidworks", then select "entry level" for the experience level (left side...scroll down), you will get a listing of jobs that have the word "Solidworks" somewhere in the description and have been submitted by the company as "entry level" experience level jobs.  You can also select "internship" as the job type, to further narrow the results of the search.  And, of course, look for jobs that are within commuting distance from where you live.

                                                • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                  Rick McDonald

                                                  Eric,

                                                  What I haven't seen yet in your posts is what is your current experience / training - you say you have been in school for 3 years - but what courses were you taking or what was your major.  Do you have any drafting related experience?

                                                  What do you want in the short term and in the long term (start as a drafter and end as a lead drafter, junior engineer to engineer, Management goals ...)  This will determine a lot of what direction and what type companies you want to focus on.  But also keep your options open and don't get over focused on one particular job classification. 

                                                   

                                                  I went to college for Aircraft Electronics.  After college I worked security to get some money while I was looking for an electronics position.  I ended up working in a truck bay, verifying nobody tried to steal anything.  During lunch I sat at a table with a manager and we were just talking and he asked my education - I told him and he said they were looking for electronics tech's up front - 3 days later I was working in the electronics department.  You never know how things might just fall in your lap. I didn't even think that there might be positions in that company for my field.  I also always had the attitude that I was still learning and pushed to learn more (if you ever stop learning, you are going backwards) - I was later promoted up to the engineering department - that is where I got to look over the shoulder of one of the senior engineers and he taught me allot about drafting and where to learn more about it on my own. Now I am a Mechanical Engineering Manager and I still do the drafting, designing, and install and train others.

                                                  Put yourself out there even if it doesn't seem to be "Exactly" what you are looking for - you never know when a good opportunity will fall in your lap and you might even like it better than what your current target job would have you doing.

                                                  • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                    Eric Eubanks

                                                    I've read a lot of suggestions that I should work in a machine shop. Are there machine shop jobs that don't require any schooling or would I have to go to school to work in a shop and then try to get a cad job?

                                                    • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                      Roland Schwarz

                                                      If you’re entry-level then you should put more weight on who you work with than anything else. Make sure you get in a place that has people you can learn from.

                                                      • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                        Roland Schwarz

                                                        Do you want to "use SolidWorks", or do you want to design? If the answer is not the latter then best move along.

                                                        • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                          Roland Schwarz

                                                          Network! Network! Network! Go to every user group meeting you can. Make friends. Learn from them; listen to their stories. Don't be pushy, but be visible. Bring your laptop. Have a problem or two ready to discuss, preferably in a state that invites engagement from others.

                                                           

                                                          Always have a copy of your resume handy, but always wait until asked. (Though sometimes asking for a review is a good way to start a conversation.)

                                                           

                                                          Simply having the word "SolidWorks" in your LinkedIn profile helps get recruiter hits.

                                                           

                                                          Learn about pain. People get hired to solve a problem or fill a need. In an interview, if you can convey that you understand the interviewer's needs, spoken and unspoken, you're way ahead.

                                                           

                                                          There's entry-level, then there's bottom-feeding. Don't be a bottom feeder. Definitely don't work for one.

                                                           

                                                          Again, who you work with is far more important at this stage than anything else.

                                                          • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                            Rob Edwards

                                                            Hi Eric

                                                             

                                                            As normal I have no idea if this is a viable option, but the thought came to me and I don't see anyone else has suggested it.

                                                            We have had a few interns with us.  They spend a year in industry as part of their university education.  The last one told me that most of her friends were working for a VAR.  If you purely want to work with Solidworks then this seems like a route that would suit you.  Maybe you are lucky and have a VAR near you.  You could give them a call and find out their recruitment criteria. 

                                                            If successful I'm pretty certain you would receive lots of training and get a wide breadth of experience.

                                                             

                                                            I mentioned this to my VAR when I was complaining about the quality of the assistance we had received and he said, you have to understand that we get many enquiries for very simple problems.  Anyway this is me just postulating.

                                                             

                                                            When I was young I used to temp for local businesses, doing anything that came up.  It's a similar story to what Rick McDonald shared.  Once you get your foot in the door, you have a chance to shine, but equally I did a lot of jobs that were awful.  To me these have proved just as valuable in the long run.

                                                             

                                                            I once spent two weeks working nights at a company manufacturing Sprinklers for fire protection.  After the second night I was promoted from washing the cast bodies to tapping the threads.  It was the epitome of drudgery - but incredibly intense at the same time.  Imagine juggling, inserting and removing the bodies - the tap just went up and down all night at a pace that was just humanly possible.  I very much hope that this kind of job has been replaced by a robot these days, but I always felt sorry for the men for whom this was a permanent position.  I wish I had pinched one as a souvenir to remind me.

                                                             

                                                            At our company the essential attribute we look for is not skills or experience, but attitude.

                                                             

                                                            Good Luck

                                                              • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                Kevin Chandler

                                                                Rob Edwards wrote:

                                                                 

                                                                Hi Eric

                                                                 

                                                                As normal I have no idea if this is a viable option, but the thought came to me and I don't see anyone else has suggested it.

                                                                We have had a few interns with us. They spend a year in industry as part of their university education. The last one told me that most of her friends were working for a VAR. If you purely want to work with Solidworks then this seems like a route that would suit you. Maybe you are lucky and have a VAR near you. You could give them a call and find out their recruitment criteria.

                                                                If successful I'm pretty certain you would receive lots of training and get a wide breadth of experience.

                                                                 

                                                                ...

                                                                 

                                                                At our company the essential attribute we look for is not skills or experience, but attitude.

                                                                 

                                                                Good Luck

                                                                Mr. Edwards makes a (another one) good point with the VAR path. If you're just enamored by the software, rather than what the software is used for and all that encompasses, then go that route (or something similar).

                                                                 

                                                                SW is a tool, one of many, that you must know how to employ and when and where to employ it.

                                                                If this isn't your path, don't travel it. Hiring types will smell it on you and will not let you in the door (this is their path, so they have the snouts for it).

                                                                 

                                                                The attitude reminder is probably the best takeaway from all of the wisdom typed for this post.

                                                                 

                                                                By Be someone who can be relied upon.

                                                                Note that I didn't qualify that last sentence or add conditionals because the transition zone is a sliver's width.

                                                                You can either be relied upon. Or you can't.

                                                                 

                                                                Cheers,

                                                                 

                                                                Kevin

                                                              • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                Dave Bear

                                                                I'm curious Eric,

                                                                As

                                                                 

                                                                 

                                                                 

                                                                 

                                                                  • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                    Eric Eubanks

                                                                    My school is just one class mostly solidworks. I've had some autocad too.

                                                                      • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                        Dave Bear

                                                                        Eric Eubanks wrote:

                                                                         

                                                                        My school is just one class mostly solidworks. I've had some autocad too.

                                                                         

                                                                        Hi Eric,

                                                                        If by that statement you are telling me that the last three years of schooling has been based around SolidWorks or CAD then I'm afraid I have bad news for you.

                                                                         

                                                                        I'm not one to sugar-coat things and tell you that everything is cool when it's not, so this comes from a place of honesty for your own benefit. If you have truly had 3 years of Cad education and you are at the stage you are then I feel that either the curriculum is sub-standard or that you are not grasping the subject as much as you should/could be. Different people learn at different rates but even taking that into account I feel (imho) that you shouldn't be asking the questions you are if you have three years of CAD study under your belt. With that in mind, it doesn't mean all is lost, in fact in enforces in some way the concept that perhaps you need practical experience prior to technical experience.

                                                                         

                                                                        Please understand, this is all based on the fact that I call a spade a spade and that I am assuming your statement means what it seems too!

                                                                         

                                                                        Dave.

                                                                          • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                            Eric Eubanks

                                                                            I appreciate your honesty with me. I understand it's better to have hurt feelings now than to be struggling to find a job later. My school also has a composites class that I'm somewhat interested in. The problem is that composite technicians don't get paid as much as I would like. I could just take the composites shop class and then do cad for composites when I have a better understanding of how they work. Composites are a growing industry so I think I'll be able to find a job there.

                                                                              • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                                Dave Bear

                                                                                I'm glad you understand that I'm not out to be vicious or cruel, I'm just being honest with you and not propping you up for a big fall.

                                                                                 

                                                                                Can I ask if you have discussed any of this with peers like your parents or such. What is there input. Also, your lecturers should be giving you some guidance as to were you need to be improving or how you can improve rather than just letting you go through the motions. Think of it this way, the ladder to success has many rungs (steps) and we all have to start at the bottom. Later in life you'll be glad that you did because when you hit success you still be able to relate to those on the bottom step because you've been there. So maybe it's time to reset a little. Draw up a plan, Cad might be the 3rd, 4th, or 5th step, I don't know.

                                                                                 

                                                                                Dave.

                                                                                  • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                                    Eric Eubanks

                                                                                    My parents said I should stay in school for a longer before looking for a job.

                                                                                    My teacher in school said I should start looking for a job now, but he's an architect so he knows cad, but he's not that great with solidworks.

                                                                                    I've been looking through linkedin for composites design engineer jobs in salt lake city, utah area and I haven't found many. I'll see if I can search other websites for composite design engineers.

                                                                                     

                                                                                    Edit: I could still get a job as a composites technician and then get a cad job with composites when it becomes available even if there aren't many.

                                                                                     

                                                                                    Edit: plastic injection molding might work better.

                                                                                      • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                                        Al Griego

                                                                                        Modeling plastic parts has its own skill set. You have to be careful to make sure the model is drafted correctly. Make sure there are no undercuts. Watch out for thin wall sections. Watch out for thick wall sections that can create a sunken area.

                                                                                         

                                                                                        Plastic mold design is even tougher. Research what you want to do, but remember one thing: "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans". You may prepare for a job doing composite design, or plastic parts, but you may end up in another industry all together. Be flexible, and don't stop learning. I started with a navy contractor working on pumps, fans and turbines, and moved into detention equipment, beverage dispensers, oil wellhead equipment, aerospace and automotive. It's been a great experience, and I learned a lot from all of my jobs. Some things carried over to other industries, and some didn't, but I made it a point to learn as much as I could.

                                                                                    • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                                      Kevin Chandler

                                                                                      Eric Eubanks wrote:

                                                                                       

                                                                                      I appreciate your honesty with me. I understand it's better to have hurt feelings now than to be struggling to find a job later. My school also has a composites class that I'm somewhat interested in. The problem is that composite technicians don't get paid as much as I would like. I could just take the composites shop class and then do cad for composites when I have a better understanding of how they work. Composites are a growing industry so I think I'll be able to find a job there.

                                                                                      "Hurt feelings"...an alternative perspective:

                                                                                      Persons who are frank and polite with you are concerned for you because they respect you as a fellow adult. Welcome these persons.

                                                                                      Persons who placate you and pat you on your head and wipe the snot from the end of your nose are not concerned for you because they don't respect you as an adult. Shun these persons.

                                                                                       

                                                                                      If underpayment is your employment metric, you will forever be without employment (or until you get the job as a Powerball grand prize winner).

                                                                                       

                                                                                      Put on your hiring shoes for a moment: In walks this fella, bright & willing, but with zero experience.

                                                                                      Ask yourself: How much would I pay for zero?

                                                                                       

                                                                                      Cheers,

                                                                                       

                                                                                      Kevin

                                                                                        • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                                          Eric Eubanks

                                                                                          I understand what you mean about hurt feelings. Dave bear was telling me I'm not good enough yet for a cad job. Some people might take offense to that, but I didn't. I said I appreciated his advice.

                                                                                           

                                                                                          About payment. I looked at the bottom and the top of the payscale for a composite technician. In my current job I make quite a bit more than newbies in that field and the top of the payscale isn't too great either.

                                                                                            • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                                              Kevin Chandler

                                                                                              Eric Eubanks wrote:

                                                                                               

                                                                                              I understand what you mean about hurt feelings. Dave bear was telling me I'm not good enough yet for a cad job. Some people might take offense to that, but I didn't. I said I appreciated his advice.

                                                                                               

                                                                                              About payment. I looked at the bottom and the top of the payscale for a composite technician. In my current job I make quite a bit more than newbies in that field and the top of the payscale isn't too great either.

                                                                                              Roger that.

                                                                                              Remember, future SW compadres may search the forum for this topic and find this thread as you started a pertinent discussion.

                                                                                              So some of the replies, such as mine, may be addressed accordingly so, more so than in your general direction.

                                                                                               

                                                                                              Cheers,

                                                                                               

                                                                                              Kevin

                                                                                              • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                                                Doug Seibel

                                                                                                When changing vocations, it is fairly common that one must take a reduction (often, a very substantial reduction) in pay at the beginning.  After all, you are jumping from a vocation that you are more experienced in to something that you are less experienced in.

                                                                                        • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                                          Rick McDonald

                                                                                          Eric,

                                                                                          I am still a bit confused about your education time and classes.

                                                                                          Have you been a full time student in college for 3 years with a major in CAD work that included Autocad and Solidworks,

                                                                                          or

                                                                                          Have you been a full time student in college for 3 years for a different major that included a single class during this 3 years for Solidworks,

                                                                                          or

                                                                                          or have you been a part time working and part time student (taking 1 or 2 classes per semester) and those 1 or 2 classes per semester was for CAD?

                                                                                          I got the impression from your answers that you have had another major or you have only taken 1 or 2 classes in Solidworks and had some previous Autocad experience.

                                                                                          I think Dave Bear was under the impression that you have Majored in Cad for 3 years and that is why his comments were more that you were not getting good teaching or not learning enough if you are having this trouble with 3 years of in-depth Solidworks training.

                                                                                          You also indicated you have (or had) other jobs - does this mean that you are currently working at some other position and want to move more into design with Solidworks?

                                                                                          If we have better understanding of your level of training and abilities it will help us to better answer and guide you.

                                                                                      • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                                        Kevin Chandler

                                                                                        Hello again,

                                                                                         

                                                                                        If you're travelling the fab process route, then another suggestion is to learn the process capabilities of the various equipment available in-house  and at outside vendors.

                                                                                         

                                                                                        This reason for this post stems from a recent project where the client's design forced the use of a machine tool with a bed that you can stand on and walk around on.

                                                                                        For those in the know, this is a large machine and a huge capital expense and therefore is expensive and with less availability.

                                                                                         

                                                                                        The client was as casual about this as if it went on a Harbor Freight mill and I would surmised they didn't know or care of the cost differences.

                                                                                         

                                                                                        Cheers,

                                                                                         

                                                                                        Kevin

                                                                                        • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                                          Kevin Chandler

                                                                                          This was posted here: Non-technical Thread: Favorite Quotes  by Todd Blacksher but it's a good bit of wisdom for this post:

                                                                                          • Re: What's a good basic entry level job for solidworks?
                                                                                            Todd Blacksher

                                                                                            Kevin Chandler shared one of my favorite quotes, here are two more (One from John Lennon, and one from me.)