6 Replies Latest reply on Apr 25, 2018 10:55 AM by Bill McEachern

    Wind Tunnel Setup and Testing.

    Tim Montano

      I've read that it is not possible to impart a simulated spin or movement to a part or an assembly being put through a simulated wind tunnel testing scenario within SolidWorks.  I don't know if this is true across the board with all versions of SolidWorks or if it only applies to my older version of SolidWorks.  If this is true, are there work-arounds that any of you more experienced SolidWorks users have developed?

       

      I know enough about setting up  Wind Tunnels for  testing static models but,  if it IS possible to impart movement to the model being tested, I have yet to figure out how to do it.  In this case I'm wanting to impart spin to a cylindrical projectile within my Wind Tunnel in order to tweak the outside dimensions and geometry of that projectile for optimum levels of air flow around it for a given velocity window.

       

      Just as a side note:  I posted a similar question here a couple of days ago but I can't seem to find it so I'm assuming that I did something wrong at the time of its posting that caused it to fail to appear as a discussion in this particular section of the forums.

        • Re: Wind Tunnel Setup and Testing.
          Bill McEachern

          If your projectile is axisymmetric then u can apply an angular velocity to the projectile wall as a boundary condition.

          • Re: Wind Tunnel Setup and Testing.
            Tim Montano

            Greetings Bill:

             

            My projectile is in fact axisymmetric.  In my planning of these wind tunnel tests of the various configurations of this model I had planned on doing several tests from various angles.  I don't know if this qualifies as the same thing you have suggested but it's good to know that we might be on the same page; especially since you are most likely far more advanced in the use of SolidWorks than I am.

             

            My initial inquiry  was to find out if it was possible to impart a simulated spin on my projectile/model while it was being tested in my wind tunnel setup.  At this point a yes or no answer would go a long way toward pointing me in another direction as far as moving forward with this series of designs.

             

            I've found by trial and error experience that I may have a better chance of finding a solution to my dilemma by asking other self-taught SolidWorks users. The logic behind this stems from the fact that we self-taught goobers are still to ignorant to know what's possible and what's not possible to achieve with the SolidWorks software.  Those who aren't formally taught tend to find work-arounds for various problems that the formally taught  have been taught  are just not possible.

             

            Geez: I just read my own writing and I'm afraid I just came off sounding like the most disrespectful shmuck on this forum.  I hope you'll forgive me for that.  My point was that when one is formally taught in a certain discipline like the use of SolidWorks, along with that teaching comes the knowledge of it's limitations.  You've heard the saying, "Ignorance is bliss?"  Well, when you're ignorant of the vast majority of how SolidWorks works, you're not as restricted by formal knowledge in the art of wasting your time trying things that someone that does have formal training wouldn't waste their time on.

             

            I'm not sure if anyone has tried this before or if it's even possible but,  I was thinking about creating an animated assembly and attempting to cram that into a wind tunnel for testing.  My models are essentially made up of three parts; the nose, the body and the tail.  The question is,  it possible to do a wind tunnel test of a moving assembly?  I haven't tried it yet but I plan to try.  I guess I'll have my answer then unless I'm doing it incorrectly.  With a CAD software as capable as SolidWorks one would think that such a thing would be possible; if not now then perhaps in upcoming iterations of the SolidWorks software.

              • Re: Wind Tunnel Setup and Testing.
                Jon Dahlgren

                Not possible to use a moving mesh in SolidWorks which it seems like you're searching for.

                 

                You can however work with boundary conditions as Bill suggested or make multiple parametric studies to capture the effects of something that travels through your domain.

                • Re: Wind Tunnel Setup and Testing.
                  Bill McEachern

                  The moving wall can reference say a coordinate system at the pointy end of the projectile and aligned with its axis so you could do angle of attack studies.

                  How you are trained, in my humble opinion, has no relevance on whether you can figure out how to solve your problems with engineering software. Your understanding on how the physics works combined with your ability to devise test experiments and validation data certainly does though.

                    • Re: Wind Tunnel Setup and Testing.
                      Tim Montano

                      Gentlemen: thank you so much for taking the time to post replies to my inquiry.  I really do appreciate it.  I've been racking my brain trying to think of a way to apply spin to my model within the wind tunnel I'll be setting up.  In a way, it's almost good to hear from Jon about it not being possible to use a moving mesh in SolidWorks.

                       

                      This means that I can breath a sigh of relief that I wasn't going about trying to make it happen incorrectly.  I've thought of a couple of different ways to try to make this happen within SolidWorks, even though it's not supposed to be possible.  I'm going to try those ideas and  If I can't get it to work in SolidWorks I'll look around at other CAD software that may offer a different set of possibilities.  Chances are that if SolidWorks can't do it then perhaps one of the other CAD offerings can; or at least come close to it.