8 Replies Latest reply on Apr 8, 2018 8:40 AM by Dennis Dohogne

    What's the best way to do research for solidworks?

    Eric Eubanks

      I'm often finding things that I don't know how to do in solidworks. So I try using google and youtube to find the answer, but often I have very specific questions that you can't really google so I just ask on the forums. The problem with that is it takes a long time to wait for a reply. Waiting for this long for replies won't work when I start using solidworks professionally or even in school when my assignments have deadlines.

        • Re: What's the best way to do research for solidworks?
          J. Mather

          In my experience most questions (when fully defined and including relevant files, screen shots and other information) are answered faster here than I could find in a search.

          What issue are you experiencing (be specific)?

           

          Your school should prepare you for professional work.

          Most anything that I have to search for is complex enough that some time find an appropriate solution is expected.

          The power of the forum as a Collaboratory (Collaboration Laboratory) is that often I get many different "solutions" from different perspectives and sometimes as a group the forum moves from disparate solutions to a solution that is a "thing of beauty" that was not in whole the suggestion of any one contributor.

          • Re: What's the best way to do research for solidworks?
            Kevin Chandler

            Eric Eubanks wrote:

             

            I'm often finding things that I don't know how to do in solidworks. So I try using google and youtube to find the answer, but often I have very specific questions that you can't really google so I just ask on the forums. The problem with that is it takes a long time to wait for a reply. Waiting for this long for replies won't work when I start using solidworks professionally or even in school when my assignments have deadlines.

            Hello,

             

            1. You stated "I'm often finding things that I don't know how to do in solidworks":
              True. And if you continue with SOLIDWORKS (or anything else), you will always encounter a situation where you won't know what to do.
              This is called ignorance. A condition everyone suffers from.
              That you are encountering new unknowns means you are expanding yourself.
              This is called iniative. A condition, unfortunately, not everyone suffers from.
              So keep pushing your envelope. Always. In everything.
            2. You stated "takes a long time to wait". Exactly! Don't wait!
            3. Have you done any (preferably all) of the SW tutorials?
              These have defined steps and usually a completed model to compare to your efforts. (And they're displayed side-by-side with SW so it's easy to swap your attention from tutorial to SW and back.)
              Once you've completed a tutorial, make a copy of your model and then return to the tutorial's steps and modify your copy by selecting other options in the various features in the model (& add others too) so you can learn the options, the terms and their effects.
              Also, most (if not all) forum contributors have been where you are now and have done these same tutorials, so if you do get jammed up on a part of one, and can't find resolution in a forum search, I bet it can be readily answered here, as everyone here has the same files to reference and will be familiar with them (unlike with other sources).
            4. Have you practiced each of the topics outlined in each of the SW certification exams? (Certification Catalog | Certification | SOLIDWORKS )
              These will expand your range considerably.
              Like in my tutorials ramble, vary the options to learn what's possible (& what's not).
              When you're comfortable with a topic, check it off and work the next one.
              When you've checked all of the topics in an exam, start the topics in another exam.
              Like the tutorials, many of the forum contributors have SW certs, so we'll be familair with the exam topics as well.
            5. Keep your practice models in their own folder and don't delete them so you can refer to them later.
              1. Remember: These are junk files that neither your grades nor your paycheck depend on. So they can be imperfect, numerous and of whatever content you wish to tackle at the moment.
            6. Have you taken any of the SW certification exams? If not, do so.
            7. For assistance, first search this forum using the topics and terms you picked up from your practices
              Click the magnifying glass to the right of your menu in the uppper right:of the page
            8. As J. Mather stated, you will encounter there are several avenues to the same SW destination, so don't settle on any one or two at this point in your studies
              1. For some tasks, taking different methods to the same end won't matter, but for other taks, there will be an optimal method to take over others because it will positively affect your workflow and improve your model reusage.
                But a best choice can be situationally dependent. So what's second (or third) best can be the first choice in another scenario
              2. Also, do not take anyone's word that this such-and-such way is how you have to do a task. Try it. Evaluate it. Add it to your info arsenal.
              3. So the takeaway from #9 is to absorb all the methods that you encounter without bias

               

              I hope this helps.

               

              Cheers,

               

              Kevin

              • Re: What's the best way to do research for solidworks?
                Dave Bear

                Hi Eric,

                Here's a great piece of reference material you should perhaps look at purchasing. There is a newer version coming out soon but not sure exactly when.

                 

                2013 Bible.jpg

                 

                Dave.

                • Re: What's the best way to do research for solidworks?
                  Maha Nadarasa

                  2018-04-07_19-11-22.png

                  In addition to that there are 3 competitors

                   

                  -Your familiarity with SWX will enable you to find answer to your question by yourself. 

                  -YouTube Search

                  -Forum

                   

                  Which come first?

                   

                  It is depend on your familiarity with the SWX.

                   

                  At the beginning I was heavily depend on forum and YouTube. Now it is not the case because I have more than one year familiarity with the SWX. At the beginning my bookmark bar was full with YouTube videos now it is empty. Now I go to MySolidWorks site and forum search if necessary help file. Now I very rarely go to YouTube.

                   

                  MySolidWorks has excellent learning material. There are videos as well.       

                  • Re: What's the best way to do research for solidworks?
                    Dennis Dohogne

                    Eric:

                    1. Do ALL of the tutorials.  Even if you don't think they apply to you you will a) learn something new which is not just a new capability, but a new perspective, and they will  b) reinforce the skills from previous lessons.

                    2. Use the built-in SWX Help.  So may times the answer is right there if you just look for it.  RTFM stands for Read The Fine Manual.  The help is the official SWX document.  In searching for how to do something you often learn a better terminology to describe and even other ways of achieving what you are after.  Do not discount the value of the built-in help.

                     

                    With reference to your helmet strap question, that is not a SWX-specific question.  I suggest you look at how other helmet designs attach their straps.  The carbon fiber is an alternative material to a molded plastic or even a fiberglass layup, it does not offer a particularly unique opportunity to attach the straps.  Since you are a student and are willing to learn then I make that suggestion as my answer rather then tell you how I think you should attach the straps.

                     

                    As J. Mather  said, how you ask your question will have a lot to do with the kinds of answers you'll get.  Provide all the detail to anticipate questions someone else would ask that isn't as familiar with the problem as you.  Describe what you have already found and why those options are not adequate or confusing.