43 Replies Latest reply on Jul 19, 2018 12:30 PM by Bart Brejcha

    Switched from Creo to Solidworks

    Satish B.

      Hi all,

       

      Am new to solidworks, previously I was using Creo software, all I miss about creo is creating coordinate system freedom and options available in creo where as in solidworks has no such options??? Often I feel bad because whenever I updated some primary sketches the solidworks child features failed instead of taking or replacing the reference we had given really I feel like creo is far superior than solidworks except few things which I really likes in solidworks is that 3D sketching

        • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
          Roland Schwarz

          I relied heavily on coordinate systems when I was a Pro/E(Creo) user. One of the biggest things I miss. That and trajpar.

           

          3D sketches can provide a workable-but-cumbersome substitute. Sometimes temporary surface or solid structures do the trick when datum planes and axes don.

          • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
            Paul Salvador

            Hello Satish.. I will agree (bcuz I really liked using pro/e/wf/creo).. but, I digress... can you please post a file which can better show/compare this want/need,.. so, everyone can better understand and possibly give/show some advice/workarounds?  Thanks.

            • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
              Carrie Ives

              One thing to keep in mind, the best way of doing something in Creo may not be the best way to do it in SolidWorks. You may have to do something completely different to get the same results. Keep in mind that Creo and SolidWorks "think differently".

               

              Here are a couple of things that helped me feel like I was finally getting control in SolidWorks.

               

              Get used to showing and hiding your SolidWorks sketches and relating things back to the sketches. This will help you build stable models. Where in Creo, you would have constrained something to a face, try to constrain it back to one of your sketches if you can. This will help a lot.

               

              When you have things that go dangling in you sketches, you can use the Display/Delete Relations to replace the missing reference.

               

              Something that you might find helpful, SolidWorks will let you replace sketch entities.This may not be the best link, but it does show what I'm talking about.

              https://www.javelin-tech.com/blog/2013/09/alins-solidworks-2014-tutorial-replace-sketch-entity-video/

               

              Remember, there are things that SolidWorks is better at and things that Creo is better at. They don't have a combined program that takes the best of both of them yet (I've wanted that for years).

               

              It takes a while to get used to what SolidWorks is expecting. Give yourself time. There are quite a few people on the forums that have used both.

               

              Good luck,

              • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                Glenn Schroeder

                Carrie Ives made some excellent points.  I'd like to add that I was very fortunate to start with SW, so I didn't have any habits to "un-learn", but from watching other people switch to SW from other programs, and seeing comments here for almost 10 years, I believe the easiest way to learn SW is to forget everything you knew about other programs.

                • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                  Jaja Jojo

                  don't worry your problem is not permanent it will gone when you get to use solidworks. In my experience once i get to use the software i never think the other software.

                  • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                    Sergio Monti

                    I started working with ProE (now Creo) some years ago and went back to it few years ago for a couple of projects. I've worked with SolidEdge a lot and with Catia for o couple of year, too. I don't know about Inventor.

                    Creo is very clever and probably "higher level concept" with respect to other CAD software and there are many things it does you can't do with SolidWorks or SolidEdge or Catia and I completely agree with Carrie.

                    As a "bespoke machinery" designer I reckon Solidworks is the best. Even if it has some limitations, I find brilliant the way it deals with configurations and I like the way it manages weldings and sheet metal.

                    BTW once you start approaching macro programming, you can do pretty everything.

                      • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                        Satish B.

                        Thank you Sergio for kind info

                        • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                          M. D.

                          "I find brilliant the way it deals with configurations and I like the way it manages weldings and sheet metal."

                           

                          I would say those are actually pretty niche uses and personally since I don't use configurations (and honestly don't know why anyone would) I think it is horrible in that aspect because of the configuration specific properties overwrite custom properties, and Solidworks inserts only those in PDM.

                           

                          If you are right and those are the aspects that Solidworks shines at, then most of us should be using other software.

                            • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                              Steve Calvert

                              You're going to get a lot of grief over this...

                               

                              Niche?  I know so many people who design sheet metal parts, myself included, everyday.  Our entire dispenser is made up of various sheet metal components.

                               

                              Weldments, perhaps, is a little more a niche but even I use them sometimes.

                               

                              Configurations???  Holy cow, by far the most powerful aspect of most designs is having the ability to have configurations.  I'm using them now in sheet metal, I use them in plastic injection moulding designs and using them in Alum die cast designs. I also use the heck out of configurations when making assembly drawings and instructions,

                               

                              I think you may need to broaden your horizons a little...

                               

                              Steve C

                              • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                Glenn Schroeder

                                Marcus Dimarco wrote:

                                 

                                "I find brilliant the way it deals with configurations and I like the way it manages weldings and sheet metal."

                                 

                                I would say those are actually pretty niche uses and personally since I don't use configurations (and honestly don't know why anyone would) I think it is horrible in that aspect because of the configuration specific properties overwrite custom properties, and Solidworks inserts only those in PDM.

                                 

                                If you are right and those are the aspects that Solidworks shines at, then most of us should be using other software.

                                 

                                I don't even want to think about how many bolts, nuts, and washer files I'd need in my library if I didn't use configurations.

                                  • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                    Satish B.

                                    Ya that's true, each time assembling the fasteners would take lot of time configuration is great in that aspect

                                      • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                        M. D.

                                        you literally copy the file and give it a new number.  The McMaster carr parts are a part of the first one and when you copy the file (copy tree or pack and go) the second file is exactly the same with all the fasteners there.  Seriously it is faster to find a part in mcmcarr website and bring it into an assy than from the toolbox I don't know why anyone still uses it.

                                          • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                            Glenn Schroeder

                                            Marcus Dimarco wrote:

                                             

                                            you literally copy the file and give it a new number. The McMaster carr parts are a part of the first one and when you copy the file (copy tree or pack and go) the second file is exactly the same with all the fasteners there. Seriously it is faster to find a part in mcmcarr website and bring it into an assy than from the toolbox I don't know why anyone still uses it.

                                             

                                            I don't use the Toolbox.  I have my hardware and other often-used parts saved on our network drive.  And I don't want to start a fight, but I doubt very much that you can download files from McMaster Carr faster than I can drag them in from my other monitor and drop them into my Assembly.

                                              • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                M. D.

                                                The point is not to use the toolbox.  Using the toolbox takes more time than using vendor parts saved somewhere or even off their website directly.  I can get a 5/16" SHCS 1/4 LNG 18-8 faster by going on McMaster carr's website than trying to fumble around in the toolbox and modifying the description and all of that.

                                                 

                                                Regardless if you have all the parts of an assembly saved, you can pack and go and create a new assy that is a clone of the last one, give it a new number, and your done.  Trying to mess around with configurations is just adding extra confusion in my eyes.

                                                  • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                    Glenn Schroeder

                                                    Marcus,

                                                     

                                                    I think we're failing to communicate here, and I give up.  If you use common hardware often there's no way you can convince me that your way is faster, but you do whatever works best for you.

                                                     

                                                    Glenn

                                                    • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                      Jason Capriotti

                                                      Well, with Toolbox or even you own design table configuration driven library (Like we have), you have to put some time in on the front end to build the library. Even using the McMaster parts would mean you still have to enter in the part  number and description data for your system, just saves you the time modeling them and looking up the dimensions.

                                                       

                                                      I have Excel design tables for families of components that would be far easier to create the configurations for many sizes at once then downloading the McMaster files. Fastener descriptions are automatically built in Excel via the concatenate function pulling a master description and dimensions sizes together. And I can enter in part numbers easily in a table view.

                                                       

                                                      But to me the biggest advantage is designing in an assembly. If you want to change the fastener size, you have to "replace" the current model then browse for a replacement using separate McMaster parts. With configurations, you merely select the new size from the drop down box. Even Toolbox has this similar capability. I think that's why others here say you must be mistaken that its easy to download the files and use them that way.

                                                       

                                                      With that said, you can overdo configurations. And if you don't understand how configs work, it is more confusing.

                                                  • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                    Satish B.

                                                    So far I haven't used it, let me give try once

                                                • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                  M. D.

                                                  McMaster-Carr.  I copy the parts into my current assembly folder.

                                                   

                                                  Anytime a part or assembly is different we create a new part number for it.  In my eyes much easier to manage different "configurations" if they are separate files with separate numbers.

                                                   

                                                  But anyway Solidworks is, at it's core, solid part modeling and drawings; and if they are being beat in usability in those basic departments by other software then there is a problem.

                                                • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                  Wayne Schafer

                                                  I agree with Steve Calvert, I think you are doing yourself a disservice by not looking into the power of configurations.  By using configurations we have saved a quite large sum of modeling time.  Expand your thinking on this software capability my friend.

                                                    • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                      M. D.

                                                      Configurations have cost me a lot of time.  I prefer to know what I am working with by simply copying a file and giving it a new number and making the change.  We have machinery to maintain and it needs to be simple not only to create but to maintain with no confusion. One part, one file, one number.  Then engrave that number on every single part.

                                                • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                  Dan Golthing

                                                  Learning a new CAD system is probably like learning a new language.  You are already used to one and I'm sure most native speakers who learn a new language aren't immediately going to say, hey, this new language is way better.  I love how they conjugate vowels!

                                                   

                                                  Many of us threw a fit when SolidWorks simply changed the icon colors.  That was enough to derail our subconscious design behaviors.  So I can imagine that if there is a new workflow to learn, that will for certain be a big hurdle to jump.

                                                   

                                                  As far as less functionality, I'd like to see something that can't be designed somehow in SolidWorks.  When I learned Craptia, the instructor at the beginning of the class told us how much better it was than SolidWorks and how much more functional, but during the course we quickly found out that there was much it couldn't do that SolidWorks could.  By the end of the course we had him nearly in tears as we continued to taunt him with Craptia's deficiencies.

                                                   

                                                  Having a list of "deficiencies" or we could call them "missing enhancements" could be helpful.  Perhaps as others have mentioned there is a different workflow that SolidWorks uses.

                                                   

                                                  There are legitimate deficiencies, though.  You will soon find out that SolidWorks doesn't handle Zero Thickness Geometry.  This will cause lots of grief.  For instance, if you are doing sheetmetal and bend a flange to touch another flange, ERROR!!  You have to leave a gap whether you want to or not.  And try importing sheetmetal from other CAD systems that allow flanges to touch:  IMPORT ERRORS.  Try sectioning multi body parts or assemblies at certain places:  ERROR!  you will have to move the section off of where you wanted it.  This can really be a workflow disruptor.  Especially if you like accurate models.  Many SolidWorks users don't mind "fudging" their model to get it to work.  But then your model is no longer flawless. 

                                                   

                                                  I'm sure there are a lot of other deficiencies that can be found.  The question is how you feel about it after using it for a year or two and giving it a good shakedown.  

                                                  • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                    John Stoltzfus

                                                    Satish B.

                                                     

                                                    Welcome to the Forum

                                                     

                                                    There is so much information here on the forums -

                                                     

                                                    but I would say this is a must read -  What are your most impressive tricks of solidworks, Please spread.

                                                     

                                                     

                                                    There are so many great people in the Top Ten list, they'll do what they can to help out, plus others as well.

                                                    • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                      Roland Schwarz

                                                      Your opinion about Creo being "far superior" to SW has no validity. You've barely begun, and are still adjusting. Don't mistake the rigid mindset that Creo forces on users to "how it should be". The only thing holding you back from mastering SW is your own inability to adjust your mindset.

                                                       

                                                      The gap in capabilities between the two is very narrow, and they don't differ in ways that make one clearly better than the other except in specific cases.

                                                       

                                                      I'll be interested in your opinion after a couple years.

                                                      • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                        David Sloop

                                                        I have used both Pro-E / Creo and Solidworks over the last 20 years.

                                                        I have used them both for weldments, sheet metal, assemblies, and making drawings of all of the above.

                                                        I honestly, have found myself cussing at both.

                                                        Pro-E was definitely harder to use before they went to Wildfire, which made it much more user friendly.

                                                        I have also never really found anything I could do in one, but not the other.

                                                        I believe 80-90% of users probably do the same type of work I do on these two programs.

                                                        • Re: Switched from Creo to Solidworks
                                                          Bart Brejcha

                                                          I personally created a 40 hr course for Design-engine that compares both packages to assist companies in making unbiased non sales perspective decisions.  People can't help to make decisions based upon feelings and It can be quite a learning experience to dig down and compare each tool all with respect to workflow.   I've done 2 hr presentations to 40 hour comparisons.  I've learned so much over the past 20+ years in each tool making these types of intense discussions.

                                                           

                                                          I noticed the conversations above and one point mentioned SW configurations.  SW Configurations compares quite closely with Simplified representations in Creo.  Can be created both in parts & assemblies.  I use that all the time in Solidworks so I can manage the large assembly and just look at plastic parts fit for example and not look at all the aluminum parts inside for example.   I've been using Solidworks since 1996 & Creo since 1991    I also know Alias Maya BTW  I have lots of stories.

                                                           

                                                          Bart Brejcha

                                                          Design-engine.com