5 Replies Latest reply on Feb 6, 2018 4:35 PM by Glenn Schroeder

    Mates Path to Ground?

    Derek Eldridge

      I'm having a hard time determining mates that hold a component in relationship to the origin of the assembly.

      I don't believe the path to ground symbol is working properly, and has not i noticed it in 2014. I'm still seeing the issue in 2017.

      In regards to this mate symbol

      Solidworks help describes it as:

      The icon indicates mates that are in the path to ground. These mates hold the part in position relative to the origin of the assembly.

      2017 SOLIDWORKS Help - Mate Icons in the FeatureManager Design Tree

      also see earlier description:

      2015 SOLIDWORKS Help - View Mates Window

       

      I have an example (attached) in which the mates on 3 out of 4 Nuts in an assy are clearly not mated to the origin of the assembly, yet they show this symbol.

      Is this a broken feature? Or am I not understanding it correctly?

      In the attached example, the first nut is fixed to the origin. This one shows correctly.

      Each of the following nuts are not tied to the origin at all, only each other. And all mates show as path to ground. Why?

      The example was saved with Solidworks 2014.

        • Re: Mates Path to Ground?
          Matt Peneguy

          The first nut has align axes which makes the origin to origin mate full restrict the nut, the others do not have that checked, and can't because you have an offset set.

            • Re: Mates Path to Ground?
              Derek Eldridge

              Matt Peneguy, You are correct about part 1. It is fully matted to the assembly Ground by means of Origin of Part to Origin of Assy. That is an example of when the symbol is supposed to be shown.

               

              However, the distance mates on the following parts, are the Origin of Part to Origin of another Part. Not the Origin of the Assy. These mates should not be showing the symbol, because these mates are not a path to the Assy Ground.

              In other words, all but the first Nut, are showing false path to ground symbols.

               

              The point in my question is not to fully constrain the assy, but to show an example of when the symbol is not telling the truth.

            • Re: Mates Path to Ground?
              Glenn Schroeder

              To me that description in the Help is misleading.  As I understand it that icon indicates that the mate is being used to define that component's location in space, where a mate in that component's folder that doesn't have that icon is holding another component in place (such as if there was a washer or bolt mated to the nut).

                • Re: Mates Path to Ground?
                  Derek Eldridge

                  Glenn Schroeder, take a look at the example. If what you say is true, and that is how I interpreted the help file as well, then the 4 mates (not the Origin mate) should all not be showing that icon. They only hold the components in place relative to one another, with no path to assembly features, assy origin, or the Nut who is matted to the assy Origin.

                    • Re: Mates Path to Ground?
                      Glenn Schroeder

                      Derek Eldridge wrote:

                       

                      Glenn Schroeder, take a look at the example. If what you say is true, and that is how I interpreted the help file as well, then the 4 mates (not the Origin mate) should all not be showing that icon. They only hold the components in place relative to one another, with no path to assembly features, assy origin, or the Nut who is matted to the assy Origin.

                       

                      I should have added above that while that's the way it's supposed to work, I haven't found it to be reliable.  I generally ignore that icon.  It's my usual practice to fully restrain a component as soon as it's inserted, so I always know that the first few (usually 3, but occasionally 2 or 4) Mates in the folder are the ones holding that component in place.