32 Replies Latest reply on Jan 26, 2018 2:15 PM by Josh Brady

    Bottom blue line

    Daniel Filote

      Hi,

      I am new to solidworks, an ex Creo user.

      I was just wondering if it's possible to move that bottom blue line in an assembly. I used to call that an "insert line" in creo. I know I can move it in a part, but I don't know why I can't move it on an assembly as well.

      can anyone help me with that?

      thank you,

       

      Daniel

        • Re: Bottom blue line
          Glenn Schroeder

          Welcome to the forum.  In an Assembly, as you add features, such as sketches, planes, Linear Component Patterns, etc, they will be placed below where you see Mates in your screenshot.  The blue line will move down with them.  Then you'll be able to move it to suppress those features, but you can't drag it any higher than where it is now.  If you want it higher (and I sometimes do), just Shift+select the components above it and suppress them.  I know that's not a perfect solution but I believe it's the best one available.

           

            • Re: Bottom blue line
              Bob Van Dick

              Glenn,

               

              I didn't realize that line couldn't be moved in an assembly.  What's the point in having it?

               

              Bob

                • Re: Bottom blue line
                  Glenn Schroeder

                  Bob Van Dick wrote:

                   

                  Glenn,

                   

                  I didn't realize that line couldn't be moved in an assembly. What's the point in having it?

                   

                  Bob

                   

                  As I said above, you can move it, but you can only move it up until you get to "Mates".  I use it often to suppress Linear Patterns when mating components to make sure I don't mate them to components that were inserted with Linear Patterns, since this has caused me instability issues in the past.  I frequently have 10 or more patterns in an Assembly.  It also helps if there are errors, since I can drag the bar up, and then back down to un-suppress them one at a time to diagnose and fix the errors.

                    • Re: Bottom blue line
                      Bob Van Dick

                      As I said above, you can move it, but you can only move it up until you get to "Mates".  I use it often to suppress Linear Patterns when mating components to make sure I don't mate them to components that were inserted with Linear Patterns, since this has caused me instability issues in the past.  I frequently have 10 or more patterns in an Assembly.  It also helps if there are errors, since I can drag the bar up, and then back down to un-suppress them one at a time to diagnose and fix the errors.

                       

                      So are you saying that any assembly that has mates as the last item in the feature tree, the blue line cannot be moved?  I find this to be true in my assemblies (mates is the last feature).

                        • Re: Bottom blue line
                          Bob Van Dick

                          Ok, the light is turning on.  My assemblies just have components, not features....that's why I can't move the bar....

                          • Re: Bottom blue line
                            Glenn Schroeder

                            Bob Van Dick wrote:

                             

                            So are you saying that any assembly that has mates as the last item in the feature tree, the blue line cannot be moved? I find this to be true in my assemblies (mates is the last feature).

                             

                            Yes, it can be used just like in Parts, but you can't drag it above "Mates".  As Dan Pihlaja  said farther down, the order of component insertion is meaningless, so the ability to drag it higher would have limited value anyway.  And as I said above, it's pretty simple to Shift + select components and suppress them, so to me it's not worth worrying about.

                        • Re: Bottom blue line
                          Paul Salvador

                          .it screams the question....why not!? 

                        • Re: Bottom blue line
                          Daniel Filote

                          Thank you, Glenn.

                          I know I can do that, but it is just frustrating that the line exists and you can't use it as you can use it on a part mode.

                          Best regards

                          • Re: Bottom blue line
                            Dan Pihlaja

                            That isn't entirely true Glenn.

                            You can add sketches ABOVE the components in an assembly and that sketch will rebuild BEFORE the components will.

                             

                            The blue line to basically go backward and forward in history.  Which means that if you have features or sketches that are ABOVE the components, you can drag the blue bar there.

                            See the attached video.

                            In the video, you will see 2 sketches in the assembly.  The square sketch was built in the assembly and placed BEFORE the components and the circle sketch was built AFTER the components in the tree.

                             

                            You will see that when I drag the blue bar to the Square sketch, the assembly components disappear.

                             

                            It is all about Child/parent relationships.  You can have a sketch that drives your components before the components.  IF your sketch that drives your components is AFTER your components, then you will have a circular rebuild issue.

                          • Re: Bottom blue line
                            Jeremy Feist

                            as Glenn Schroeder says the blue bar (the solidworks name is "rollback bar") only rolls back through FEATURES. if you want to order the components in a SW assembly, you can just drag them up and down the tree.

                            • Re: Bottom blue line
                              Daniel Filote

                              If that's the way it works, for me, personally, that blue line is useless in assembly mode.

                              I mean, I think you all agree that it would be so much easier to go through assembly history, and see how things were done, if you could use that line as in part mode, thru components as thru features. instead of supressing components.

                                • Re: Bottom blue line
                                  Dan Pihlaja

                                  Daniel Filote  wrote:

                                   

                                  If that's the way it works, for me, personally, that blue line is useless in assembly mode.

                                  I mean, I think you all agree that it would be so much easier to go through assembly history, and see how things were done, if you could use that line as in part mode, thru components as thru features. instead of supressing components.

                                   

                                  You have to realize that, for components specifically, assembly order doesn't matter.  So there is no set timeline for them.  Therefore, it wouldn't even make sense to run the blue bar through the components.

                                   

                                  Did you watch the video that I posted above?

                                    • Re: Bottom blue line
                                      Daniel Filote

                                      I can't see your video, or maybe I don't know where to look, this is my first post.

                                        • Re: Bottom blue line
                                          Daniel Filote

                                          And what do you mean by assembly order doesn't matter? of course it matters, from a manufacturers perspective.

                                          I have to keep in mind how will they assembly all the components, step by step.

                                          So, for example, if I want to modify the first component or second from that assembly, if all the other components had constrains  with that component, my whole assembly will go red and full of mates errors. And I would like the option to take them one by one. without creating extra sketches or other features. see what I mean?

                                            • Re: Bottom blue line
                                              Dan Pihlaja

                                              Daniel Filote wrote:

                                               

                                              And what do you mean by assembly order doesn't matter? of course it matters, from a manufacturers perspective.

                                              I have to keep in mind how will they assembly all the components, step by step.

                                              So, for example, if I want to modify the first component or second from that assembly, if all the other components had constrains with that component, my whole assembly will go red and full of mates errors. And I would like the option to take them one by one. without creating extra sketches or other features. see what I mean?

                                               

                                              Assembly order matters for manufacturer's of course.

                                               

                                              But Solidworks doesn't see any order between components that are in the same assembly.  There is no history.

                                               

                                              If you have 2 components that need to be assembled together before they get assembled to a 3rd component, then that is where sub assemblies come in.  You mate them together in the sub assembly, then add that sub assembly to your main assembly then add the 3rd components.  That is how you control assembly order by design in Solidworks.

                                               

                                              And the reason that you can't see the video attachment is that you are still viewing this thread from your inbox in the forum.  Click the header of the thread to open it separately in a new tab.  THEN you will be able to see attachments.

                                               

                                               

                                              Then watch the video and I think you will see what I mean.

                                              • Re: Bottom blue line
                                                Steve Calvert

                                                Ok, I'm not going to install the cylinder head onto the engine block before the pistons go in but in SW, it doesn't matter where they are in the tree.  No history like Pro/E which makes it easier to mate and add components.

                                                 

                                                The "Blue" line can be moved but only in front of assembly level features, IE. a LocalPattern or an Assembly level sketch.

                                                 

                                                Steve C

                                        • Re: Bottom blue line
                                          Steve Calvert

                                          Daniel, you don't need to move it to insert a component behind another.  SW allows you to mate any component to any component regardless of position in tree.

                                           

                                          Steve C

                                          • Re: Bottom blue line
                                            Jody Holm

                                            It is good practice to assemble a model as you would if you were holding the parts in your had. You would not put the nut on a bolt before you put the bolt through the hole. I believe that is Dan's point. He is practicing good design skills by making assemblies in an orderly fashion. He wants to check his work by scrolling up through the components. It's that simple. Solidworks might not care but Dan does.

                                              • Re: Bottom blue line
                                                Josh Brady

                                                Jody Holm wrote:

                                                 

                                                It is good practice to assemble a model as you would if you were holding the parts in your had. You would not put the nut on a bolt before you put the bolt through the hole. I believe that is Dan's point. He is practicing good design skills by making assemblies in an orderly fashion. He wants to check his work by scrolling up through the components. It's that simple. Solidworks might not care but Dan does.

                                                 

                                                That's not the purpose of the rollback bar.  As many have already mentioned, components are different from features and don't really have an order.  If you're after a tool that sort of animates the assembly of components in feature tree order that could be done by hiding/showing components with a macro.

                                                  • Re: Bottom blue line
                                                    Jody Holm

                                                    Obviously not....point is, it would be nice if it did work like that. Dan said that's how CREO worked. That's why he is asking the question. Also, it is not Animation we are talking about here, we are talking about scrolling back a model.

                                                      • Re: Bottom blue line
                                                        Josh Brady

                                                        Jody Holm wrote:

                                                         

                                                        Obviously not....point is, it would be nice if it did work like that. Dan said that's how CREO worked. That's why he is asking the question. Also, it is not Animation we are talking about here, we are talking about scrolling back a model.

                                                         

                                                        It wouldn't be nice if it worked like that.  Because THAT'S NOT WHAT IT'S FREAKING FOR!  It can't work like that because that is not how SolidWorks assemblies work.  You can't "roll back" things that are not history dependent.  It just doesn't make sense.  If you want a program in which assemblies work different, like CREO where assembly order apparently matters to the PROGRAM then use a different program.  If you want to beat nails into the wall, don't use a pair of pliers.  If you want a visualization tool that shows you graphically what order the components are in the feature tree it's a different tool.  It's a totally possible tool, and it may help you out in your own personal opinion of what characterizes "best practice".  I could write that tool in a couple of hours.  I didn't say "Animation".  That's a different SolidWorks function that means a different thing.  I said "sort of animates".  Meaning graphically behaving the way you think want the rollback bar to work. 

                                                    • Re: Bottom blue line
                                                      Glenn Schroeder

                                                      Jody Holm wrote:

                                                       

                                                      It is good practice to assemble a model as you would if you were holding the parts in your had. You would not put the nut on a bolt before you put the bolt through the hole. I believe that is Dan's point. He is practicing good design skills by making assemblies in an orderly fashion. He wants to check his work by scrolling up through the components. It's that simple. Solidworks might not care but Dan does.

                                                       

                                                      As a matter of fact, in SolidWorks I always place the washers first, then the nut.  Then I take a quick measurement so I know how long the bolt needs to be.

                                                        • Re: Bottom blue line
                                                          Jody Holm

                                                          OK, so what do you mate the washer too? Or are you just screwing a washer to a bolt and calling it good?

                                                            • Re: Bottom blue line
                                                              Glenn Schroeder

                                                              Jody Holm wrote:

                                                               

                                                              OK, so what do you mate the washer too? Or are you just screwing a washer to a bolt and calling it good?

                                                               

                                                              I mate the washers to whatever I'm bolting together.  In the example below the washer is mated concentric and coincident to the steel,  and the washer and nut were likewise inserted and mated on the other side.  Then the bolt was inserted and mated.

                                                               

                                                                • Re: Bottom blue line
                                                                  Jody Holm

                                                                  Exactly. So the steel was there first, then you added your fastener. That is good design practice. Now, when you add another component, you will be able to see if your fastener will clear it....because you are assembling your model in the correct order. Now you can see why assembly order does matter.

                                                          • Re: Bottom blue line
                                                            Colt Carson

                                                            Like others said, you can't move the line. There are some helpful assembly organizational tools like folders and grouping identical components. I use these all the time to simplify the tree when working with large assemblies. The added benefit of the grouping is when you drag a new part into the assembly it will automatically be inserted at the end of the group.

                                                             

                                                            add to folder.JPGgroup.JPG

                                                            • Re: Bottom blue line
                                                              Paul Salvador

                                                              btw,.. since this is not a option... consider using "Isolate" for viewing up the tree...  that is, from the point where you would roll the bar too, ctrl/select the parts above and RMB... Isolate.