11 Replies Latest reply on Jan 26, 2018 8:53 AM by Jim Steinmeyer

    Brazing Symbols

    Joe Tonkin

      Hi All,

       

      I am creating drawings for an assembly where all the parts are brazed together. How does one show a brazed joint in Solidworks? I've worked with the symbols for typical welds. But I've found some slightly different symbols for brazing on the internet. Does solidworks have anything? If not, how do you call out a brazed joint?

       

      Thanks much,

      Joe Tonkin

        • Re: Brazing Symbols
          Josef Kasik

          I think that you should use a menu Insert > Annotations > Caterpillar or End treatment

          • Re: Brazing Symbols
            David Nelson

            Think if I had to call it out I would use the normal weld figure call out the bead type fillet or Butt.  Then in the tail I would say "Braze".

            • Re: Brazing Symbols
              Francisco Martínez

              Are you working to a certian standard? ISO or AWS?

               

              I have seen 2 methods of calling out braze weld symbols, one uses standard weld flags and callouts for the type of weld process

              welding-processes-by-letters-tab3-1-1.gif

               

              the other method is to show the braze joint and specify where the braze filler should be

              brazing-symbols_lg-1.jpg

              • Re: Brazing Symbols
                Jim Sculley

                AWS A2.4 defines the standard symbols for brazed joints.  They can all be represented using normal SW weld symbols.

                  • Re: Brazing Symbols
                    Jim Steinmeyer

                    Jim,

                    That is what I was looking for before replying and all I found was a synopsis telling me that I could purchase the booklet. Short of having the standard to make sure the symbol was right I would just put a note in the tail as David mentioned. Furthermore, if we don't know what a symbol means, how many of the guys on the floor will?

                      • Re: Brazing Symbols
                        Jim Sculley

                        Jim Steinmeyer wrote:

                         

                        Jim,

                        That is what I was looking for before replying and all I found was a synopsis telling me that I could purchase the booklet.

                        I have on occasion lucked out and found PDF links in Google searches pointing to full documents.  Often they are not the latest version, but information such as symbols doesn't change much.  The very first result when I searched for 'brazing weld symbols' was such a link.

                         

                        Of course, if you are going to be doing work on a regular basis that requires meeting AWS or some other criteria (ASME, SAE, etc), you really should purchase the latest documents.  It stinks, but such is life under standards organizations.

                         

                        Short of having the standard to make sure the symbol was right I would just put a note in the tail as David mentioned.

                        I work for a company whose primary business is welding.  I have on many occasions put the following note on a drawing:

                         

                        WELD SIZE AND TYPE LEFT TO THE DISCRETION OF THE WELDER

                         

                        Not on safety related equipment such as ladders or platforms, but simple welded frames or brackets.

                         

                        Furthermore, if we don't know what a symbol means, how many of the guys on the floor will?

                        Well, that's true of *every* symbol on a drawing though isn't it?  The brazing section of the 140 page AWS 2.4 spec is only 4 pages.  It includes the following:

                        ===========================================

                        15.3 Special Preparation Not Specified. All symbols

                        used for welding may also be used for brazing, where

                        suitable. If no other special preparation other than cleaning

                        is required, only the arrow and the reference line

                        need be used, with the process indicated in the tail [see

                        Figure 49(A), (B) and (C)].

                         

                        15.4 Application of Symbols. The application of conventional

                        weld symbols (as shown in Figure 1) to brazed

                        joints is illustrated in Figure 49(D), (E), (G), (H), (I),

                        and (J), which also depicts how joint clearance can be

                        indicated.

                        ============================================

                         

                        So, something like this is perfectly acceptable:

                        where TB is 'torch braze' as listed in the post by Francisco Martinez above.  Or you can get all crazy with something like this:

                         

                         

                        which means you want this:

                         

                          • Re: Brazing Symbols
                            Francisco Martínez

                             

                             

                             

                            which means you want this:

                             

                            That is a very good example Jim, Im having flashbacks from my welding days

                            • Re: Brazing Symbols
                              Jim Steinmeyer

                              Jim Sculley wrote:

                               

                              Furthermore, if we don't know what a symbol means, how many of the guys on the floor will?

                              Well, that's true of *every* symbol on a drawing though isn't it? The brazing section of the 140 page AWS 2.4 spec is only 4 pages. It includes the following:

                              Great information Jim, Just last year i was reamed by the owner because I created a drawing using the standard 3 views and didn't specify where the views came from because "those guys on the floor don't know how to read those fancy prints"!

                               

                                   Time for training?

                                • Re: Brazing Symbols
                                  Jim Sculley

                                  A couple of years back, we had several parts come out of the machine shop with errors.  These were simple parts made on a manual Bridgeport mill.  Several people above my pay grade looked into it and called a meeting in which my entire Engineering group was told that we had to draw all of our parts with the ordinate dimension origin at the top left corner of the part view because one particular machinist (who made all the bad parts) couldn't read when the dimensions were upside-down.

                                  Image result for true story

                                  • Re: Brazing Symbols
                                    Dan Pihlaja

                                    Agreed.  We are NOT to dumb down our drawings for people who are either not properly trained or simply cannot figure things out.

                                      • Re: Brazing Symbols
                                        Jim Steinmeyer

                                        Dan Pihlaja wrote:

                                         

                                        Agreed. We are NOT to dumb down our drawings for people who are either not properly trained or simply cannot figure things out.

                                        OH, I've been doing that for years. Someday I'll work at a job where they actually pay the shop people enough to hire knowledgeable ones.