16 Replies Latest reply on Dec 12, 2017 11:35 AM by Carrie Ives

    Drawing/Part Numbering system

    Amit Kumar

      Hello everyone,

       

      A company is in the Machine manufacturing & has never been into the drawing number/data management which causing them to lot of rework.

      What I am trying to seek here is to get the idea of making the Drawing numbers & Part number.

       

      1). For standard machine

      2). For non standard machine(spm)

       

      Regards

        • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
          Tateos Tvapanyan

          This is how I did it in my previous company.

           

          Project01-XX.XX.XX.YY

          Project01 - is machine designator, it could be a name or alphanumeric string.

          XX - assembly and/or subassembly sequence number. You can add as many levels you need. if the subassemblies are more than 99 add one number XXX

          YY - part/drawing sequence number. If it is necessary YYY.

           

          I don't know will that work for you, just sharing my experience.

           

           

          Capture.JPG

          • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
            David Matula

            What kind of part # system do you want?

            a smart part # would let you know what kind of part it is by looking at it...

            the dumb part # system would just assign a # to it. and that is all that you would know about it.

             

            Smart ex.  ANG-2-2-A-012A

            here you have an angle that is 2 x 2 x A that is 1 ft long.  the variable a keeps the part # from getting long as it would be = to a fractional dimension.

            I have always said that a part # system can be anything as long as you build a legend to go with it.  That allows anyone to come in and look it look at the legend file and soon they will start to understand that ANG = angle, HBM = H-beem  AAA= ____

            As long as it is written down and someone can follow and continue on with the part # system it can evolve and grow.

            • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
              Deepak Gupta

              Part numbering would vary from company to company but either standard or non-standard components, I would suggest to have part number for each file. That way inventory is easier and you can reuse the components effectively saving time and money.

               

              Also make it mandatory to save file as part number rather than plate, sheet, nut, etc. at the time of file creation and keep drawing number same as model. This would avoid any further references issues.

                • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                  Amit Kumar

                  Hello Deepak sir, I want to ask more as why drawing number should be same as part number & if not then what are the reasons ?

                    • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                      Deepak Gupta

                      Amit Kumar wrote:

                       

                      Hello Deepak sir, I want to ask more as why drawing number should be same as part number & if not then what are the reasons ?

                      1. Easy to find, track and reuse the drawing since both are same number.
                      2. If drawing number is same then SOLIDWORKS can find them (if you use open drawing from model), provided the path is same or path has been set in the search path.
                        • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                          Amit Kumar

                          Okay, what would be in this case; if there is a part which is common between four different machines then it will have different drawing number because, it'll come under different assembly tree so accordingly it'll get different drawing number.

                            • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                              Tateos Tvapanyan

                              In my work, I often share a part/subassembly from one machine/assembly into the another.

                              I did never change the part name and drawing and use it as it is.

                              If you use a PDM system, it is straightforward to manage this.

                              • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                                Deepak Gupta

                                Amit Kumar wrote:

                                 

                                Okay, what would be in this case; if there is a part which is common between four different machines then it will have different drawing number because, it'll come under different assembly tree so accordingly it'll get different drawing number.

                                No that part number should not change. You can instead create part numbering system for components that would be commonly used such that you are no issuing two different drawing for same part.

                                 

                                With more quantity of same/common components, you would be reducing costs.

                                • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                                  Jim Steinmeyer

                                  Amit Kumar,

                                  This is one of the reasons we do NOT include the project or assembly number in the piece part number. If a piece part is numbered 123-4567 indicating it belongs in project 123 then it becomes confusing if you give that exact same part number 789-4567 to place it in a different project. But if that part is 987654 no matter where it is used you can keep track of that part much more easily.

                                       Here we manufacture feeder/mixers to feed cattle. With several different produce families that can use some of the same parts we have set up a top level assembly number that has all of the standard components of a feeder family line. Then we have various options that are given standard part numbers that do not change depending on where used. Finally we keep a master file of all of our orders sent out. That file lists the top level number item used on that order along with all of the sub assembly numbers used so that they can be easily found. In a system like this it is very beneficial for the part and drawing numbers to be the same.

                          • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                            John Stoltzfus

                            Here we use a code for a semi "Smart Numbering" system for all our manufactured items, our purchased numbering system is different..

                             

                            Customer

                             

                             

                            Style

                             

                             

                            Product Type

                             

                             

                            Size/Option

                             

                             

                            So looking at the part number only and looking at the part numbering Key, I can easily find who it's built for, what it is, what size..

                             

                            Part numbering can be a hiccup for smaller companies and depending on the system they can be very confusing as well. 

                            • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                              Anthony Kanov

                              If I had a chance to do it I would keep it short and simple.

                              Longer PNs increase the chance of typing mistakes (I believe I have read somewhere any number with more than 7 symbols becomes a challenge when typing). I still can not comprehend it how almost all the companies use over 15 symbols. The PNs are entered and re-entered and communicated by phone or in conversation all the time. What a loss of productivity! And still- even good companies go with it.

                              And then there is the effort to make them descriptive- source of constant and unnecessary discussions and irritation. A single database lookup or excel file could give you more useful information than most sophisticated PN.

                              With that said- if I had to implement a numbering system it would be:

                               

                              YYXX-XX-XX

                               

                              where YY is the year followed by two symbols for project number - assembly - part

                              Alphanumeric input is allowed - that will give you minimum of 1000 entries for each project, assembly, part (10 digits and about 25 letters- do not use letters I, O, L that look similar to some digits)

                               

                              To build a library instead of YY start the number with LXXX an go from there...

                              One could go a little further and have MXXX- for material perhaps but KEEP IT SIMPLE!

                               

                              Anyway- that's how I see it.

                               

                              The most efficient company I worked for used a similar system - we never run out of numbers

                              • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                                Jim Steinmeyer

                                Like John we use a semi-smart numbering system. We use a 6 digit number AA#### with the first two numbers indicating what category the part belongs in. 01 would be purchased materials with 011### being mild steel sheet or plate, 012### Stainless steel plate and so on. The 1##### numbers being fabricated piece parts, 2###### are purchased components and so on. Then as David mentioned we have a legend that gives direction as to what the smart numbers are.

                                     I am usually an advocate for the part numbers being more along the meaningless side of things however  one thing that I liked at a previous job was the way they did the hardware numbering the number was set up along the lines of 123-ab-cd and then they created a spread sheet to keep track of the parts. The first numbers would designate what the item was with ab being the spreadsheet row designating the diameter and cd representing the column designating the length. So say 1 is a hex head, 2 is a cap screw and 3 is a grade 8, then ab is 3/8" and cd is 1-1/2" long. Now you can set up a spreadsheet with all possible diameters and lengths of a piece of hardware, one sheet for imperial and another for metric and only fill in the cells with the parts you have in the system. If you need a new size of bolt the part number is per-determined and you just enter it in the system and the smart designation still works. If you need a new type of hardware just create a new sheet and you can have it organized from the start as well.

                                • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                                  Scott Boerman

                                  For our job shop work, the filename starts with the part number.  We use XXXX-YYY (description, including purchased part number).   XXXX=job number, YYY= items number (for that job only).

                                  Example:  3856-003 Net Block;   3856-004 Bushing P-26-12-0.250

                                  As Deepak suggested, there is value to have a filename for each component, this helps downstream processing when someone need to open just the component file for nc programmng or whatever.  The filename is carried through very easily to the BOM, and even the drawing name and in the drawing title block, the filename is used as the part number and part name.  This also makes for very quick/easy balloons in the assembly print, and the reader of the print gets lots of information from the balloons directly without needed to transfer focus to a BOM.  This also avoids any extra work to make extra properties. 

                                  As mentioned this is good for a job shop, not sure how well it would work for standard items. 

                                  • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                                    John Stoltzfus

                                    The only thing I would change here is the information between sales and the manufacturing drawings.  There are two different product numbers, no way to know how to associate or match the two different schemes.  Apparently it steams from the accounting software, being limited or was limited in amount of characters, this goes way back and it takes a little time job by job "if" I get the information.  With the old system there is no way to cross reference anything.  You don't need to use the same numbering system between sales and manufacturing, but darn it, you should at the very least create and maintain a cross reference numbering system in the drawings and part file..

                                    • Re: Drawing/Part Numbering system
                                      Carrie Ives

                                      Take some time setting up your part numbering. You'll be stuck with it. Think about how your current processes work and how you want them to work.

                                       

                                      I've used semi-intelligent part numbering and unintelligent part numbering. I recommend a semi-intelligent numbering scheme. I have been doing a lot of work where different projects had different customers. We would use a customer or project number for the first several digits of the number. We would have a couple of digits to indicate general type of part (mechanical, electrical, I do a lot of enclosures with circuit boards in them.) Then there would be a part of the number that was just assigned sequentially. We have sometimes had the numbers indicate what part of an assembly it might go in, but that can quickly get out of hand.

                                       

                                      I have worked for a company that just assigned numbers sequentially. So, a circuit board could have a part number one digit from a label or bracket or who knows  what. This makes it very hard to remember the numbers and you have to rely on search functions.

                                       

                                      If you put too much intelligence into your part numbers, it can get hard to keep track of and then you can also end up with things that don't quite fit.

                                       

                                      I worked at a place that had a couple of letters or numbers at the start of the part number to indicate what kind of thing it was - mechanical assembly, plastic part, circuit board. This was followed by a project number and then a sequential number. It was easy to look at something and tell what it was and have some idea what project it was designed for. It was fine to use that part again on a different project if there were no changes. This system was also easy for me to remember part numbers.

                                       

                                      I also recommend that part numbers be broken up in some fashion. 123-1234-123 is much easier to read/remember than 1231234123. Or even 123A1234123 is easier to remember and read.

                                       

                                      Consider also how you will handle revisions. Is that part of the part number? What happens when you have to change the design and update the part number?

                                       

                                      If you design both standard and custom versions of things, is the custom version a completely different number or does it have some relation where you can tell what it started from?

                                       

                                      I like having the drawing number and the part number the same. If they aren't the same, they should be related in some fashion just to make finding things easier.